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Engineering Education

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NEWS
March 16, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drexel University, the University of Pennsylvania and eight other colleges have been awarded $15 million by the National Science Foundation to "revolutionize the education of engineers" through curriculum reform and drawing more women, minorities and people with disabilities into the field. The five-year grant, being announced today, goes to the Gateway Coalition, a consortium of colleges directed by Drexel. Another $15 million grant is being awarded to a coalition of colleges in the Southeast and will be headquartered at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Revolutionary War hero. Father of the country. First president of the United States. For it all, George Washington got a single day honoring his birth - and one he now has to share with Lincoln, at that. But for his work as a humble county employee in Virginia in 1749, Washington gets an entire week of tribute by the nation's engineers. Washington is hailed as their patron saint by many of U.S. engineers, and he will be lauded through Saturday during National Engineers Week.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martha Barber Montgomery, 62, the assistant vice president for program evaluation at Drexel University and a highly regarded specialist in engineering ethics, died of cancer Saturday at Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia. She lived in the Art Museum area. Dr. Montgomery attended the Speyer School for gifted children in New York City and was a subject of the Hollingworth Study of high-IQ children. At age 19, she received her B.A. in history from Bryn Mawr College. In the same year, she was married to Dr. DeWitt Hall Montgomery Jr., and for the next decade she devoted herself to raising their four children.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Amy Gorman of Cherry Hill, a senior at Cornell University, has been named the winner of the Gen. George C. Marshall Award, which is given to those enrolled in Army ROTC programs. A 1998 graduate of Cherry Hill High School West, Gorman is battalion commander of Cornell's Army ROTC unit. After graduation in May, Gorman will be commissioned as a second lieutenant and will enter active duty in the Army. Gorman's great-grandfather served in the Army with the Fifth Cavalry and later served in the Navy during World War I; her grandfather was a Marine in the South Pacific during World War II; and her father retired as a colonel after 30 years of active duty in the Army.
NEWS
August 6, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert E. White, 78, professor emeritus and former chairman of the department of chemical engineering at Villanova University, died of lung cancer Friday at his home in Newtown Square. Dr. White chaired the department from 1949 until retiring in 1986, and was responsible for raising most of the funds for the construction of the Chemical Engineering Annex at the university. He previously taught at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., for two years, and worked for the York Corp.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ZULIESUIVIE Ball was a senior at Central High School with excellent grades, a strong feminist attitude and a passion for writing. One thing the 18-year-old Olney student didn't have was an interest in computer science. That changed, however, when a classmate invited her to a Saturday workshop on Java programming. "I actually ended up growing to like it and what they were teaching, and became a part of it," said the soft-spoken, bubbly teen, now a freshman at Temple University.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the Center for Engineering Education and Research at Villanova University on Thursday, the tools in use included toilet-paper rolls, tissue boxes, Popsicle sticks, and glitter glue. Some of the school's biggest brainiacs wore headpieces fashioned from pipe cleaners while they sang a children's song. The goal was to encourage free-spirited creativity among a group traditionally boxed in by methodology and math. And, just possibly, to inspire the next Steve Jobs - whoever he or she might be. As the world absorbed the news of the death Wednesday of Apple Inc.'s cofounder, and wondered what would become of the U.S. technology sector without Jobs' extraordinary vision, Villanova's College of Engineering spent two hours trying to get 28 sophomores to think more like Jobs and less like engineers.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bulldozers still sit in mud outside the building that Rowan University officials are trumpeting as a jewel of the campus. And though Henry M. Rowan Hall is unfinished and its completion is more than a semester behind schedule, engineering students will attend their first classes today in the much-anticipated building. Originally scheduled to open last September for the second year of this university's engineering program, the hall will be used for freshman and sophomore laboratory classes this spring.
NEWS
August 29, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard E. Llorens, 79, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired professor of engineering and mechanical science at Pennsylvania State University, died of a stroke Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital. In 1965, Dr. Llorens joined the founding faculty of the Penn State School of Graduate Professional Studies, which had opened in a rented school building in King of Prussia. The mission of the new venture was to address the market needs of Southeastern Pennsylvania through advanced education, offering several degree programs, including engineering, as well as professional development courses.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 160 middle school girls brewed lip gloss, built bridges, and manipulated fiber optics last week - just like professional engineers. For the 10th summer, Rowan University offered hands-on "Attracting Women Into Engineering" workshops aimed at dispelling stereotypes about the field and boosting the profession's female representation, which has stagnated nationally. "We teach them it's not all about hard hats," said Kauser Jahan, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, who started the workshop in 1999 with 20 girls.
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NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ZULIESUIVIE Ball was a senior at Central High School with excellent grades, a strong feminist attitude and a passion for writing. One thing the 18-year-old Olney student didn't have was an interest in computer science. That changed, however, when a classmate invited her to a Saturday workshop on Java programming. "I actually ended up growing to like it and what they were teaching, and became a part of it," said the soft-spoken, bubbly teen, now a freshman at Temple University.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the Center for Engineering Education and Research at Villanova University on Thursday, the tools in use included toilet-paper rolls, tissue boxes, Popsicle sticks, and glitter glue. Some of the school's biggest brainiacs wore headpieces fashioned from pipe cleaners while they sang a children's song. The goal was to encourage free-spirited creativity among a group traditionally boxed in by methodology and math. And, just possibly, to inspire the next Steve Jobs - whoever he or she might be. As the world absorbed the news of the death Wednesday of Apple Inc.'s cofounder, and wondered what would become of the U.S. technology sector without Jobs' extraordinary vision, Villanova's College of Engineering spent two hours trying to get 28 sophomores to think more like Jobs and less like engineers.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Creamer, 92, a founder of a forerunner of the College of Engineering at Temple University, died of lung failure Monday, July 25, at the Regency Retirement Village in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he had lived for 12 years. It took a three-step process for today's College of Engineering to emerge. A 1966 Inquirer article said Mr. Creamer was at that time department chairman of mechanical engineering technology at Temple University's Technical Institute. A 1968 Inquirer article said that, while continuing as department chairman, he had become director of the institute.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John L. Rumpf, 90, formerly of Rydal, a civil engineer and an educator and administrator at Drexel and Temple Universities, died of heart failure Thursday, March 17, at Southampton Estates, a retirement community in Southampton, Bucks County. For 13 years, Dr. Rumpf was a professor of civil engineering at Drexel, and from 1964 to 1969 he headed the civil engineering department. He then joined the faculty at Temple and in 1970 was appointed dean of the university's new College of Engineering Technology.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
George P. McCasland, 80, an engineer and educator who had a passion for learning, died Thursday, Feb. 10, from heart disease at his home in Southwest Philadelphia. Mr. McCasland had a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, a master's degree in business administration from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a master's degree in psychology from Temple University. He had taken courses for certification to teach mathematics, reading, and physics and had almost completed the course work for a doctorate in linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 30, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judson Free Vogdes III, 74, of Haddonfield, a civil engineer and educator, died at Virtua Hospital Marlton on Nov. 17 of lymphoma and prostate cancer. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Vogdes graduated from Germantown Friends School in 1953. He earned an engineering degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1957, and a master's degree in engineering from Villanova University in 1971. After college, Mr. Vogdes went to work for his father at Vogdes Engineering in Center City. In the 1960s and 1970s, he tackled projects in Eastwick and Society Hill for the city Redevelopment Authority, and later joined other Philadelphia engineering firms.
NEWS
August 29, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard E. Llorens, 79, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired professor of engineering and mechanical science at Pennsylvania State University, died of a stroke Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital. In 1965, Dr. Llorens joined the founding faculty of the Penn State School of Graduate Professional Studies, which had opened in a rented school building in King of Prussia. The mission of the new venture was to address the market needs of Southeastern Pennsylvania through advanced education, offering several degree programs, including engineering, as well as professional development courses.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 160 middle school girls brewed lip gloss, built bridges, and manipulated fiber optics last week - just like professional engineers. For the 10th summer, Rowan University offered hands-on "Attracting Women Into Engineering" workshops aimed at dispelling stereotypes about the field and boosting the profession's female representation, which has stagnated nationally. "We teach them it's not all about hard hats," said Kauser Jahan, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, who started the workshop in 1999 with 20 girls.
NEWS
April 11, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward M. Phillips, 73, of West Mount Airy, a chemical engineer and educator, died of heart failure March 25 at Chestnut Hill Hospital. A native of Camden, Dr. Phillips earned a bachelor's degree from Lafayette College and a master's degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University. He later earned a doctorate in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. From 1959 to 1972, Dr. Phillips was a research engineer with Arco in Philadelphia and a project engineer with Esso in Florham Park, N.J. For two years, he was an associate professor in chemical engineering at Tufts University in Massachusetts.
NEWS
January 22, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. DeLuccia Sr., 73, who taught evening classes at Drexel University for three decades during a career at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, died Monday of colon cancer at his home in Paoli. In 2002, the Philadelphia chapter of ASM International, formerly the American Society for Metals, named Mr. DeLuccia its Materials Person of the Year. Mr. DeLuccia juggled two careers and earned commendations in both. In Warminster, he retired in 1994 as manager of the aerospace materials division, where he was a senior engineer.
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