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Engineers

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NEWS
April 28, 1992 | By CORBIN A. McNEILL JR
Throughout U.S. history, engineers have overcome technological challenges, discovering how to explore the ocean floor, the mountains of the moon and everything in between. Engineers are the architects of the standard of living of the developed world. But in recent years engineers have in many instances been stymied in building needed projects because of their inability to confront political issues. Engineers have simply been out-maneuvered by those with a high degree of political sophistication on such issues as highway construction, solid waste disposal, the Clean Air Act, construction of transmission lines and storage of low-level radioactive waste.
SPORTS
March 6, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With DePaul University assistant coach Nicci Hays-Fort looking on, Keisha Hampton gave an up-close look of what the Blue Demons can expect when the 6-foot-2 center arrives in Chicago. From the herculean effort Hampton put forth last night, expect DePaul head coach Doug Bruno to receive a glowing report. Actually, an out-of-this-world report. Hampton poured in a career-high 40 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, blocked four shots, and made two steals to power Engineering and Science to a 55-36 rout of Allentown Central Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA second-round state playoff matchup at Norristown.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seventh and eighth graders with a creative spirit and an interest in engineering are invited to enter the National Engineers Week Future City Competition, which will begin in September. The competition challenges student teams to design a city of the future using computer software and three-dimensional scale models. They also must write an essay about their cities, addressing such issues as pollution, transportation and communications. "It enables them to see how engineers work . . . the rigorousness of design, procedure, working together to a common plan, a common goal," said John Kampmeyer, coordinator for the Philadelphia Regional Future City Competition.
SPORTS
June 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Certain members of the South Philadelphia Stars had more on their minds Sunday than winning an American Legion baseball game. Like, seizing an advantage in mind games. "It was going back and forth the whole time," Al Piccoli said. " 'We're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'No, we're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'We're just not going to beat you. We're going to kill you.' . . . 'No you're not.' " The friendly banter could be traced to the fact that Al Piccoli, and his brother, Chris, play their Public League ball for Engineering and Science, while fellow Stars Dominic Raia, Ty Bradley, Jason Parr, Jim Silvanio and Joe Destra represent Southern.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D. Meisel of Marple Township has been named a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland. Meisel is a professional engineer who is president of the Ambric Companies, an engineering and materials testing organization in Philadelphia. He was honored for his efforts to promote the free movement of graduate engineers between Ireland and the United States, as well as helping to establish other professional links between the two countries. He is also one of the few Americans to holding registration as a Euro Engineer (Eur-Ing)
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Justin Scott loves basketball and wants to remain involved in the game long-range, so he plans on becoming a broadcaster. We wonder what his comment would have been yesterday, after Engineering and Science fell into a 19-3 hole in a Public League game against visiting University City. "Hmm," he said. "I probably would have said, 'They look like they're scared. They look like they don't have any heart.' " That's probably what he would have said. But here's what he was thinking.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Lynn Greer is one of the anti-franchises in city scholastic basketball. He doesn't show off, doesn't run his mouth, doesn't shirk his classroom responsibilities, doesn't threaten to transfer any time he is not passed the ball on three consecutive trips down the court. What he does is play hard with team goals in mind when wearing a uniform, and behave like a model citizen, unceasingly, when wearing street clothes. Lynn Greer is what can happen when a youngster receives loving and persistent familial support.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Abbe Klebanoff, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown supervisors have approved pay increases for the township's solicitor and its engineers despite objections from a supervisor who wanted a study conducted to see whether the increases would be a burden to the taxpayers. The supervisors voted, 3-1, Tuesday to enact a resolution calling for the increase. Board member George Marcellus, the lone dissenter, said he wanted to postpone the raises until the township could research the financial effect. "I think we are talking significant money," he said.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It was "purely accidental" that Richard Kellerman and Paul Nielsen developed an electronic system that would help rowers all over the world. The two men were working for Xerox Corp. in 1978 when the rowing coach at the University of Pennsylvania, a friend of a friend, started bringing Kellerman things that needed fixing. Kellerman, a chemical engineer, passed most of the odd jobs on to Nielsen, a physical engineer. The two tinkered away and realized that they probably could make most of the things they were repairing.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
It's still January, but it has already been a long season for Lincoln basketball fans. With Engineering and Science visiting Tuesday, most fans - and Lincoln coach Charlie Davis - had hoped that the Railsplitters could notch their first league win of the year. But the Engineers (5-9 overall, 2-6 league) jumped out to a 13-point lead after three quarters and held off Lincoln (3-14, 0-7), 71-65. "It was a game that I hoped we would win," Davis said. "I thought this was one game that was sort of even, talentwise.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid a slew of administrative actions Wednesday, Rowan University's board of trustees granted the dean of its engineering school a number of requests that will keep him busy this year: a new doctoral program, an undergraduate major in engineering entrepreneurship, an undergraduate minor in civil engineering, and the renovation of its Rowan Hall engineering building. After the board passed its stack of resolutions, Tony Lowman, the dean of the College of Engineering, reported to the board on the status of the school.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles F. Mengers, 94, of the Ogden section of Lower Chichester, a musician and former director of research for the Philadelphia Electric Co., died Tuesday, Sept. 9, of myasthenia gravis at his home. Born in Wilmington, Mr. Mengers grew up in Oaklyn and lived in Chester before moving to Ogden in 1950. He was a 1938 graduate of Collingswood High School, where he was a standout runner of the 100- and 220-yard dashes, and concertmaster of the orchestra. In 1942, Mr. Mengers earned a mechanical engineering degree from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. He did additional executive study at Columbia University and Dartmouth College.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After a mortar shell wounded Joseph F. Weber in southern France in 1944, field hospital physicians "would have chopped his leg off," son John said. "But there was a newer doctor who had just come over," from the States and "he thought he could rework the veins and save his leg. " And he did. At military hospitals in England and the States, "it was a two- to three-year rehab process," and still the leg "bothered him for the last 70 years," his son said. On Tuesday, Aug. 12, Mr. Weber, 89, of Ocean City, N.J., an operations manager for Mobil Oil in South Jersey, Illinois, and New Zealand, died of lung cancer at home.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hiroshi Uyehara was working for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power in January 1942 when he and others of Japanese background were fired, in the month after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. By May 1942, the American-born 26-year-old and his family were incarcerated at Santa Anita Park, a racetrack in Arcadia, Calif. It was a result of Executive Order 9066 signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in February 1942, which eventually displaced 122,000 persons of Japanese ancestry from their West Coast homes.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward T. Haney, 89, of Doylestown, a decorated World War II veteran, died Tuesday, July 22, of a heart ailment at Fairview Care Center. Born in Abington and raised in Elkins Park, Mr. Haney worked for 32 years as a lubrication engineer at Fiske Bros. Refining Co. in Newark, N.J. His proudest moments, however, came while he served in the Army during World War II, his family said. He was a rifleman assigned to the 29th Infantry Division, one of the first to land on Omaha Beach during D-Day.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin E. Lunn, 81, of Runnemede, a former school board member there, died of lung cancer Sunday, July 27, at the Vitas Inpatient Hospice Unit of Kennedy University Hospital in Stratford. Born in Camden, Mr. Lunn graduated from Rutgers Preparatory School in Somerset and earned a bachelor's in electrical engineering at Drexel University. During the Korean conflict, he was a fire central technician on the battleship New Jersey. Mr. Lunn chose a career as an electrical engineer because his father had worked in that field, Mr. Lunn's wife, Carolyn, said.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Sponseller, 87, a civil railroad engineer and longtime Wayne resident, died Thursday, July 24, of cancer at Shannondell at Valley Forge. Mr. Sponseller was hired by the Pennsylvania Railroad as a civil engineer fresh out of college, and remained in the industry throughout his career, retiring from Amtrak in 1991. Born in Canton, Ohio, he attended Lincoln High School there while also working to help support his family. He served in the Navy during World War II, and then attended Illinois Institute of Technology on the GI Bill.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's infrastructure has not improved since 2010, and the ongoing deterioration of its bridges and the near-failing condition of its roads remain a major economic problem for the state, according to a report card released Wednesday by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The state's overall grade remained stuck at C-minus, but there was some optimism among speakers at a news conference that Pennsylvania's new transportation-funding law would start turning conditions around.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwyn L. Shoemaker Jr., 89, formerly of Haddonfield, a retired civil engineer and former World War II Navy Seabee, died Thursday, June 5, of pneumonia at Brittany Pointe Estates, Lansdale. Mr. Shoemaker grew up in Olney and graduated from Germantown Academy High School in 1943. He attained the rank of Eagle Scout in 1940. Between 1943 and 1946 he served with the Navy Construction Battalion, called the Seabees, aboard a hydrographic surveying yacht in Bermuda. Hydrography is an applied science that deals with mapping the seas and adjoining coastlines, for the purpose of navigation.
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