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Engineers

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NEWS
April 28, 1992 | By CORBIN A. McNEILL JR
Throughout U.S. history, engineers have overcome technological challenges, discovering how to explore the ocean floor, the mountains of the moon and everything in between. Engineers are the architects of the standard of living of the developed world. But in recent years engineers have in many instances been stymied in building needed projects because of their inability to confront political issues. Engineers have simply been out-maneuvered by those with a high degree of political sophistication on such issues as highway construction, solid waste disposal, the Clean Air Act, construction of transmission lines and storage of low-level radioactive waste.
SPORTS
March 6, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With DePaul University assistant coach Nicci Hays-Fort looking on, Keisha Hampton gave an up-close look of what the Blue Demons can expect when the 6-foot-2 center arrives in Chicago. From the herculean effort Hampton put forth last night, expect DePaul head coach Doug Bruno to receive a glowing report. Actually, an out-of-this-world report. Hampton poured in a career-high 40 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, blocked four shots, and made two steals to power Engineering and Science to a 55-36 rout of Allentown Central Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA second-round state playoff matchup at Norristown.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seventh and eighth graders with a creative spirit and an interest in engineering are invited to enter the National Engineers Week Future City Competition, which will begin in September. The competition challenges student teams to design a city of the future using computer software and three-dimensional scale models. They also must write an essay about their cities, addressing such issues as pollution, transportation and communications. "It enables them to see how engineers work . . . the rigorousness of design, procedure, working together to a common plan, a common goal," said John Kampmeyer, coordinator for the Philadelphia Regional Future City Competition.
SPORTS
June 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Certain members of the South Philadelphia Stars had more on their minds Sunday than winning an American Legion baseball game. Like, seizing an advantage in mind games. "It was going back and forth the whole time," Al Piccoli said. " 'We're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'No, we're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'We're just not going to beat you. We're going to kill you.' . . . 'No you're not.' " The friendly banter could be traced to the fact that Al Piccoli, and his brother, Chris, play their Public League ball for Engineering and Science, while fellow Stars Dominic Raia, Ty Bradley, Jason Parr, Jim Silvanio and Joe Destra represent Southern.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D. Meisel of Marple Township has been named a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland. Meisel is a professional engineer who is president of the Ambric Companies, an engineering and materials testing organization in Philadelphia. He was honored for his efforts to promote the free movement of graduate engineers between Ireland and the United States, as well as helping to establish other professional links between the two countries. He is also one of the few Americans to holding registration as a Euro Engineer (Eur-Ing)
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Justin Scott loves basketball and wants to remain involved in the game long-range, so he plans on becoming a broadcaster. We wonder what his comment would have been yesterday, after Engineering and Science fell into a 19-3 hole in a Public League game against visiting University City. "Hmm," he said. "I probably would have said, 'They look like they're scared. They look like they don't have any heart.' " That's probably what he would have said. But here's what he was thinking.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Lynn Greer is one of the anti-franchises in city scholastic basketball. He doesn't show off, doesn't run his mouth, doesn't shirk his classroom responsibilities, doesn't threaten to transfer any time he is not passed the ball on three consecutive trips down the court. What he does is play hard with team goals in mind when wearing a uniform, and behave like a model citizen, unceasingly, when wearing street clothes. Lynn Greer is what can happen when a youngster receives loving and persistent familial support.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Abbe Klebanoff, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown supervisors have approved pay increases for the township's solicitor and its engineers despite objections from a supervisor who wanted a study conducted to see whether the increases would be a burden to the taxpayers. The supervisors voted, 3-1, Tuesday to enact a resolution calling for the increase. Board member George Marcellus, the lone dissenter, said he wanted to postpone the raises until the township could research the financial effect. "I think we are talking significant money," he said.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It was "purely accidental" that Richard Kellerman and Paul Nielsen developed an electronic system that would help rowers all over the world. The two men were working for Xerox Corp. in 1978 when the rowing coach at the University of Pennsylvania, a friend of a friend, started bringing Kellerman things that needed fixing. Kellerman, a chemical engineer, passed most of the odd jobs on to Nielsen, a physical engineer. The two tinkered away and realized that they probably could make most of the things they were repairing.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
It's still January, but it has already been a long season for Lincoln basketball fans. With Engineering and Science visiting Tuesday, most fans - and Lincoln coach Charlie Davis - had hoped that the Railsplitters could notch their first league win of the year. But the Engineers (5-9 overall, 2-6 league) jumped out to a 13-point lead after three quarters and held off Lincoln (3-14, 0-7), 71-65. "It was a game that I hoped we would win," Davis said. "I thought this was one game that was sort of even, talentwise.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last month in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, was not using his cellphone during or before the disastrous derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. NTSB analysis of engineer Brandon Bostian's phone records shows no call, text or data usage occurred while he was operating the train - nor did Bostian access the train's Wi-Fi system while he was at the controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime catastrophe, had told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Members of Congress pointedly questioned federal rail investigators Tuesday over why they still don't know whether the engineer operating Amtrak Train 188 was using his cellphone when it crashed in Philadelphia on May 12. Three weeks later, "I just don't understand what the holdup is," Rep. Barbara Comstock (R., Va.) said at the first congressional hearing into the derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Adding to lawmakers' frustration was that the National Transportation Safety Board has access to the engineer's cellphone and password, but has not nailed down an answer.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AMTRAK PLANS to install internal cameras on its trains in the Northeast Corridor, allowing them to monitor train engineers, the corporation announced yesterday. The new safety measure follows the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188, which left eight passengers dead and about 200 injured. An investigation led by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the train sped up from 70 to 102 mph as it approached a curve near Frankford Junction. A wide-angle camera will be added to each locomotive's cab, focusing on the engineer and the control console, Amtrak Spokesman Craig Schulz said.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University in Glassboro counts its engineering program as one of its premiere academic programs and has aggressive goals to expand enrollment. A few miles away, in nearby Deptford, Rowan College at Gloucester County is working to grow its own engineering science program, potentially doubling the number of freshmen in the pre-baccalaureate program in just two years. With both Rowan schools in Gloucester County looking to expand - and cut into a piece of the state's notorious annual "brain drain" of college students - school officials signed an agreement last week to align their engineering programs and create a road map for transfer.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cellphone of the engineer on Amtrak 188 was used the day of last week's deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday, but investigators are still trying to determine whether any of the activity took place during the doomed ride. In a brief investigative update posted on its website, the NTSB said that it had the cellphone of Brandon Bostian and that records indicated that "calls were made, text messages sent, and data used" on May 12. Still, the NTSB said, investigators have not determined exactly when the phone was used, and the process for reaching such conclusions is lengthy, involving the verification of time stamps across various data sources.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
The National Transportation Safety Board says the engineer of the doomed Amtrak Train 188 apparently did not radio his dispatchers that his train had been hit by a projectile just before it careened off the tracks at the Frankford curve in Port Richmond. A review of taped conversations by the engineer, Brandon Bostian, to dispatchers shows no mention of anything hitting his train, as one of his assistant conductors has reported. NTSB's Robert Sumwalt, the lead investigator of the fatal derailment, said the Amtrak dispatchers were also interviewed about a possible report of a projectile impact.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
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