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Engineers

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NEWS
April 28, 1992 | By CORBIN A. McNEILL JR
Throughout U.S. history, engineers have overcome technological challenges, discovering how to explore the ocean floor, the mountains of the moon and everything in between. Engineers are the architects of the standard of living of the developed world. But in recent years engineers have in many instances been stymied in building needed projects because of their inability to confront political issues. Engineers have simply been out-maneuvered by those with a high degree of political sophistication on such issues as highway construction, solid waste disposal, the Clean Air Act, construction of transmission lines and storage of low-level radioactive waste.
SPORTS
March 6, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With DePaul University assistant coach Nicci Hays-Fort looking on, Keisha Hampton gave an up-close look of what the Blue Demons can expect when the 6-foot-2 center arrives in Chicago. From the herculean effort Hampton put forth last night, expect DePaul head coach Doug Bruno to receive a glowing report. Actually, an out-of-this-world report. Hampton poured in a career-high 40 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, blocked four shots, and made two steals to power Engineering and Science to a 55-36 rout of Allentown Central Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA second-round state playoff matchup at Norristown.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seventh and eighth graders with a creative spirit and an interest in engineering are invited to enter the National Engineers Week Future City Competition, which will begin in September. The competition challenges student teams to design a city of the future using computer software and three-dimensional scale models. They also must write an essay about their cities, addressing such issues as pollution, transportation and communications. "It enables them to see how engineers work . . . the rigorousness of design, procedure, working together to a common plan, a common goal," said John Kampmeyer, coordinator for the Philadelphia Regional Future City Competition.
SPORTS
June 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Certain members of the South Philadelphia Stars had more on their minds Sunday than winning an American Legion baseball game. Like, seizing an advantage in mind games. "It was going back and forth the whole time," Al Piccoli said. " 'We're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'No, we're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'We're just not going to beat you. We're going to kill you.' . . . 'No you're not.' " The friendly banter could be traced to the fact that Al Piccoli, and his brother, Chris, play their Public League ball for Engineering and Science, while fellow Stars Dominic Raia, Ty Bradley, Jason Parr, Jim Silvanio and Joe Destra represent Southern.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D. Meisel of Marple Township has been named a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland. Meisel is a professional engineer who is president of the Ambric Companies, an engineering and materials testing organization in Philadelphia. He was honored for his efforts to promote the free movement of graduate engineers between Ireland and the United States, as well as helping to establish other professional links between the two countries. He is also one of the few Americans to holding registration as a Euro Engineer (Eur-Ing)
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Justin Scott loves basketball and wants to remain involved in the game long-range, so he plans on becoming a broadcaster. We wonder what his comment would have been yesterday, after Engineering and Science fell into a 19-3 hole in a Public League game against visiting University City. "Hmm," he said. "I probably would have said, 'They look like they're scared. They look like they don't have any heart.' " That's probably what he would have said. But here's what he was thinking.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Lynn Greer is one of the anti-franchises in city scholastic basketball. He doesn't show off, doesn't run his mouth, doesn't shirk his classroom responsibilities, doesn't threaten to transfer any time he is not passed the ball on three consecutive trips down the court. What he does is play hard with team goals in mind when wearing a uniform, and behave like a model citizen, unceasingly, when wearing street clothes. Lynn Greer is what can happen when a youngster receives loving and persistent familial support.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Abbe Klebanoff, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown supervisors have approved pay increases for the township's solicitor and its engineers despite objections from a supervisor who wanted a study conducted to see whether the increases would be a burden to the taxpayers. The supervisors voted, 3-1, Tuesday to enact a resolution calling for the increase. Board member George Marcellus, the lone dissenter, said he wanted to postpone the raises until the township could research the financial effect. "I think we are talking significant money," he said.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It was "purely accidental" that Richard Kellerman and Paul Nielsen developed an electronic system that would help rowers all over the world. The two men were working for Xerox Corp. in 1978 when the rowing coach at the University of Pennsylvania, a friend of a friend, started bringing Kellerman things that needed fixing. Kellerman, a chemical engineer, passed most of the odd jobs on to Nielsen, a physical engineer. The two tinkered away and realized that they probably could make most of the things they were repairing.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
It's still January, but it has already been a long season for Lincoln basketball fans. With Engineering and Science visiting Tuesday, most fans - and Lincoln coach Charlie Davis - had hoped that the Railsplitters could notch their first league win of the year. But the Engineers (5-9 overall, 2-6 league) jumped out to a 13-point lead after three quarters and held off Lincoln (3-14, 0-7), 71-65. "It was a game that I hoped we would win," Davis said. "I thought this was one game that was sort of even, talentwise.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Carpenter Bowen Sr., 87, of Huntingdon Valley, a retired chemical engineer, died Tuesday, April 14, in the medical center at Rydal Park, a senior community, of complications from an earlier surgery. Born in Bristol, he was the son of Charles and Beatrice Bowen. The family moved to Moorestown, where Mr. Bowen became active in the Boy Scouts. He achieved the rank of Life Scout and was elected to the Order of the Arrow Brotherhood by members of his troop, his family said in a statement.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So frustrating. Budding engineers on the eight-person King Magikarps crew of the Harrison Middle School's Seabots underwater robot team thought they had considered everything in designing their underwater robot entered in Saturday's SeaPerch competition at Rowan University. They didn't expect an underwater referee's legs to get in the way, kicking up turbulence, and they didn't expect to score so low - 14 out of 24 points. "Bad things will always come your way," said Andrew McCorkle, team manager, slumping his shoulders after their robot's turn under the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One would like to imagine that, as electrical engineers in the same group at Lockheed Martin, Michael Petner and Tuan Ngo are quick to offer each other words of encouragement. But is it always quite so boisterous? "Think light!" Petner shouted at Ngo on Tuesday. "Just keep those legs up. Good job!" The 145-pound Ngo grinned gamely in reply. It might have been partly a grimace. After all, he was stuck to a cinder-block wall with duct tape. At the defense contractor's Moorestown facility, employees are participating in National Engineers Week, a celebration of a discipline that too often goes without credit for its creativity and sense of humor.
NEWS
February 19, 2015
F ELICITE MOORMAN, 41, of East Falls, is CEO of BuLogics, which calls itself an "Internet of Things" engineering firm. Founded in 2003, the East Falls company certifies, designs and builds wireless systems connecting everyday objects for Fortune 500 clients and individuals. Q: What's BuLogics do? A: If you have a light switch or door lock or safe or smoke alarm, and you want to make it connect to the Internet in a way it never has before, we make the stuff that does that. You want a door lock to talk to your smartphone?
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pasquale A. Dougherty, 68, of Springfield, Delaware County, a civil engineer, died Monday, Jan. 12, of colon cancer at home. He had lived in Springfield since May and before that in Mechanicsburg and Upper Darby, the latter for 30 years. Known as Pat, Mr. Dougherty worked in the highway industry and retired July 30, 2014. He had been found to have cancer in 2012 but did not let it slow his activities. "He loved being an engineer," said his wife, Elizabeth King Dougherty. He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1968, and a master's in transportation engineering in 1975, both from Villanova University.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
  ALLISON BERLINER, 30, of Center City, is co-founder & CEO of SpotItBuyIt, which helps small retailers sell more via Instagram with a mobile app. Berliner, a 2013 Wharton MBA, co-founded the startup - which launched in a trial phase called beta in November - with chief technology officer Roopak Majmudar, 33, of University City. I spoke with Berliner.   Q: How did you come up with the idea for SpotItBuyIt? A: We'd been working with small retailers and kept hearing the word Instagram and they really wanted help on converting mobile traffic [on]
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chittaranjan "Chitu" Shantilal Shah, 66, of Norristown, an engineer and respected member of the Indian community in the Pennsylvania suburbs, died Monday, Dec. 15, of unknown causes after collapsing at his home. Born in Mumbai, India, Mr. Shah earned a bachelor's degree in engineering at the Jai Hind College of the University of Mumbai, then came to the United States seeking to better himself and provide a bright future for his family. "My father was an amazing and kind man who has been in this area for over 40 years," said daughter Megha Shah Fitzpatrick.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Henry M. Rowan Family Foundation will donate $15 million to the engineering school at Rowan University, the second-largest gift in the Glassboro school's history, the school announced Wednesday. The money will create a permanent endowment for the engineering school, which will be renamed the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering. "It goes to our foundation and gets invested, and we are going to receive proceeds from this annually forever," said Ali A. Houshmand, the university's president.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three local guys from Villanova University and a young woman from Queens, and they will transform the Philadelphia skyscape in a remarkable way. They are structural engineers, the brilliant folks who make certain the architect's vision stands upright. They design the skeletal framework of high-rises - the lattice of girders, columns, and building cores that enable skyscrapers to stand tall through high winds and even earthquakes. Many times, they do their work hundreds or thousands of miles from a construction site, seeing their craftsmanship only in photos or on web cams.
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