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Engineers

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NEWS
April 28, 1992 | By CORBIN A. McNEILL JR
Throughout U.S. history, engineers have overcome technological challenges, discovering how to explore the ocean floor, the mountains of the moon and everything in between. Engineers are the architects of the standard of living of the developed world. But in recent years engineers have in many instances been stymied in building needed projects because of their inability to confront political issues. Engineers have simply been out-maneuvered by those with a high degree of political sophistication on such issues as highway construction, solid waste disposal, the Clean Air Act, construction of transmission lines and storage of low-level radioactive waste.
SPORTS
March 6, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With DePaul University assistant coach Nicci Hays-Fort looking on, Keisha Hampton gave an up-close look of what the Blue Demons can expect when the 6-foot-2 center arrives in Chicago. From the herculean effort Hampton put forth last night, expect DePaul head coach Doug Bruno to receive a glowing report. Actually, an out-of-this-world report. Hampton poured in a career-high 40 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, blocked four shots, and made two steals to power Engineering and Science to a 55-36 rout of Allentown Central Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA second-round state playoff matchup at Norristown.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seventh and eighth graders with a creative spirit and an interest in engineering are invited to enter the National Engineers Week Future City Competition, which will begin in September. The competition challenges student teams to design a city of the future using computer software and three-dimensional scale models. They also must write an essay about their cities, addressing such issues as pollution, transportation and communications. "It enables them to see how engineers work . . . the rigorousness of design, procedure, working together to a common plan, a common goal," said John Kampmeyer, coordinator for the Philadelphia Regional Future City Competition.
SPORTS
June 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Certain members of the South Philadelphia Stars had more on their minds Sunday than winning an American Legion baseball game. Like, seizing an advantage in mind games. "It was going back and forth the whole time," Al Piccoli said. " 'We're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'No, we're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'We're just not going to beat you. We're going to kill you.' . . . 'No you're not.' " The friendly banter could be traced to the fact that Al Piccoli, and his brother, Chris, play their Public League ball for Engineering and Science, while fellow Stars Dominic Raia, Ty Bradley, Jason Parr, Jim Silvanio and Joe Destra represent Southern.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D. Meisel of Marple Township has been named a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland. Meisel is a professional engineer who is president of the Ambric Companies, an engineering and materials testing organization in Philadelphia. He was honored for his efforts to promote the free movement of graduate engineers between Ireland and the United States, as well as helping to establish other professional links between the two countries. He is also one of the few Americans to holding registration as a Euro Engineer (Eur-Ing)
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Justin Scott loves basketball and wants to remain involved in the game long-range, so he plans on becoming a broadcaster. We wonder what his comment would have been yesterday, after Engineering and Science fell into a 19-3 hole in a Public League game against visiting University City. "Hmm," he said. "I probably would have said, 'They look like they're scared. They look like they don't have any heart.' " That's probably what he would have said. But here's what he was thinking.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Lynn Greer is one of the anti-franchises in city scholastic basketball. He doesn't show off, doesn't run his mouth, doesn't shirk his classroom responsibilities, doesn't threaten to transfer any time he is not passed the ball on three consecutive trips down the court. What he does is play hard with team goals in mind when wearing a uniform, and behave like a model citizen, unceasingly, when wearing street clothes. Lynn Greer is what can happen when a youngster receives loving and persistent familial support.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Abbe Klebanoff, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown supervisors have approved pay increases for the township's solicitor and its engineers despite objections from a supervisor who wanted a study conducted to see whether the increases would be a burden to the taxpayers. The supervisors voted, 3-1, Tuesday to enact a resolution calling for the increase. Board member George Marcellus, the lone dissenter, said he wanted to postpone the raises until the township could research the financial effect. "I think we are talking significant money," he said.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It was "purely accidental" that Richard Kellerman and Paul Nielsen developed an electronic system that would help rowers all over the world. The two men were working for Xerox Corp. in 1978 when the rowing coach at the University of Pennsylvania, a friend of a friend, started bringing Kellerman things that needed fixing. Kellerman, a chemical engineer, passed most of the odd jobs on to Nielsen, a physical engineer. The two tinkered away and realized that they probably could make most of the things they were repairing.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
It's still January, but it has already been a long season for Lincoln basketball fans. With Engineering and Science visiting Tuesday, most fans - and Lincoln coach Charlie Davis - had hoped that the Railsplitters could notch their first league win of the year. But the Engineers (5-9 overall, 2-6 league) jumped out to a 13-point lead after three quarters and held off Lincoln (3-14, 0-7), 71-65. "It was a game that I hoped we would win," Davis said. "I thought this was one game that was sort of even, talentwise.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three local guys from Villanova University and a young woman from Queens, and they will transform the Philadelphia skyscape in a remarkable way. They are structural engineers, the brilliant folks who make certain the architect's vision stands upright. They design the skeletal framework of high-rises - the lattice of girders, columns, and building cores that enable skyscrapers to stand tall through high winds and even earthquakes. Many times, they do their work hundreds or thousands of miles from a construction site, seeing their craftsmanship only in photos or on web cams.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roger A. Gibboni, 82, of West Chester, an aerospace engineer who helped design spy satellites during the Cold War, died Friday, Nov. 28, of kidney failure at Paoli Hospital. For 33 years, starting in 1960, Mr. Gibboni worked in the aerospace industry at various General Electric Co. installations in the Philadelphia area. He helped pioneer national satellite reconnaissance missions during the early 1960s, including the then-top-secret Corona photographic satellite. The program kept watch on the Soviets as a means of containing their nuclear threat, he told his family.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regional Rail engineers have asked federal regulators to require SEPTA to follow a safety rule designed to limit fatigue. SEPTA wants the Federal Railroad Administration to renew a waiver that the transit agency has had from the work rule for two years. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen asked the federal agency to deny SEPTA's request and hold a public hearing on the issue, citing accidents at other railroads caused by fatigued engineers. A sleep-deprived engineer was blamed for a fatal accident in New York last year in which a Metro-North Railroad train derailed while taking a 30 m.p.h.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Eisen, 87, a former executive with the Air Safety Foundation in Washington, died of complications from dementia on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at the Wiley Christian Retirement Community in Marlton. In the 1980s, Mr. Eisen was vice president of research and planning for the foundation, an arm of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. According to an article in the association's magazine, Mr. Eisen and his staff researched noncommercial aircraft accidents to help aviation manufacturers improve their products.
NEWS
October 30, 2014
L OUIS RODRIGUEZ , 46, of Williamstown, N.J., is president of Rodriguez Consulting, in North Philadelphia. The Chester native founded the civil-engineering firm in 2007. It's the 54th-fastest-growing inner-city business on the 2014 Inner City 100 compiled by the Massachusetts-based Initiative for a Competitive Inner City. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I was working for the Philadelphia Water Department and noticed a lot of work was outsourced to private firms.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. Lander, 88, of Wayne, a civil engineer, fire company leader, and Episcopal Academy alumnus, died Monday, Oct. 13, of end-stage dementia at Paoli Pointe retirement community. Mr. Lander, known as "Dick," was a respected civil engineer, holding executive positions at various companies, and retiring as the executive director of the Northampton Township Municipal Authority in Bucks County in 2002 at age 76. Mr. Lander received his degree in civil engineering from Tufts University in 1948.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER negotiating for five years, SEPTA has settled with one of its Regional Rail unions. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen reached a "tentative agreement" with the transit authority yesterday afternoon, according to a statement from union leaders. The parties approved a contract that, once ratified by the union's 200 members and by SEPTA's board of directors, would cover the union through July. "This agreement keeps the trains rolling in Philadelphia," union vice president Steve Bruno said in announcing the agreement.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiators for SEPTA and Regional Rail locomotive engineers reached a tentative agreement, which will avert a possible commuter rail strike if the pact is accepted by the engineers and the SEPTA board. The deal provides for SEPTA's 220 engineers to get an 8.5 percent wage increase when the contract is approved and a 3 percent raise next April. The engineers, who have not received a raise since their last contract ended in 2010, also will get a $1,250 "signing bonus" and a 35-cent-an-hour increase immediately to reflect a traditional differential above conductors' pay. All together, the engineers' increases will amount to 13.3 percent above current pay by April, the union said.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Markowitz, 86, of Huntingdon Valley, a chemist and later an aerospace engineer, died Monday, Sept. 29, at the Vitas Hospice at Nazareth Hospital of complications from a recent fall. Mr. Markowitz grew up in West Philadelphia and Wynnefield, and lived in the Philadelphia area all his life. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Temple University, where he majored in chemistry and minored in history. Mr. Markowitz worked in various capacities with Thiokol Chemical Corp., Radio Corp.
SPORTS
September 21, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova clearly was excited to play football in the first two weeks of the season, losing an overtime heartbreaker at Syracuse, an FBS team, and then rolling to a 44-point victory over Fordham, the 11th-ranked squad in FCS. The Wildcats had nowhere to take all this energy in Week 3 because they were idle. And coach Andy Talley hopes that didn't bring their momentum to a halt going into Saturday's Colonial Athletic Association opener against James Madison at Villanova Stadium. "The question is, 'Where are you as a team when you have a layoff?
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