FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | By CORBIN A. McNEILL JR
Throughout U.S. history, engineers have overcome technological challenges, discovering how to explore the ocean floor, the mountains of the moon and everything in between. Engineers are the architects of the standard of living of the developed world. But in recent years engineers have in many instances been stymied in building needed projects because of their inability to confront political issues. Engineers have simply been out-maneuvered by those with a high degree of political sophistication on such issues as highway construction, solid waste disposal, the Clean Air Act, construction of transmission lines and storage of low-level radioactive waste.
SPORTS
March 6, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With DePaul University assistant coach Nicci Hays-Fort looking on, Keisha Hampton gave an up-close look of what the Blue Demons can expect when the 6-foot-2 center arrives in Chicago. From the herculean effort Hampton put forth last night, expect DePaul head coach Doug Bruno to receive a glowing report. Actually, an out-of-this-world report. Hampton poured in a career-high 40 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, blocked four shots, and made two steals to power Engineering and Science to a 55-36 rout of Allentown Central Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA second-round state playoff matchup at Norristown.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seventh and eighth graders with a creative spirit and an interest in engineering are invited to enter the National Engineers Week Future City Competition, which will begin in September. The competition challenges student teams to design a city of the future using computer software and three-dimensional scale models. They also must write an essay about their cities, addressing such issues as pollution, transportation and communications. "It enables them to see how engineers work . . . the rigorousness of design, procedure, working together to a common plan, a common goal," said John Kampmeyer, coordinator for the Philadelphia Regional Future City Competition.
SPORTS
June 2, 1987 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Certain members of the South Philadelphia Stars had more on their minds Sunday than winning an American Legion baseball game. Like, seizing an advantage in mind games. "It was going back and forth the whole time," Al Piccoli said. " 'We're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'No, we're going to beat you guys.' . . . 'We're just not going to beat you. We're going to kill you.' . . . 'No you're not.' " The friendly banter could be traced to the fact that Al Piccoli, and his brother, Chris, play their Public League ball for Engineering and Science, while fellow Stars Dominic Raia, Ty Bradley, Jason Parr, Jim Silvanio and Joe Destra represent Southern.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D. Meisel of Marple Township has been named a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland. Meisel is a professional engineer who is president of the Ambric Companies, an engineering and materials testing organization in Philadelphia. He was honored for his efforts to promote the free movement of graduate engineers between Ireland and the United States, as well as helping to establish other professional links between the two countries. He is also one of the few Americans to holding registration as a Euro Engineer (Eur-Ing)
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Justin Scott loves basketball and wants to remain involved in the game long-range, so he plans on becoming a broadcaster. We wonder what his comment would have been yesterday, after Engineering and Science fell into a 19-3 hole in a Public League game against visiting University City. "Hmm," he said. "I probably would have said, 'They look like they're scared. They look like they don't have any heart.' " That's probably what he would have said. But here's what he was thinking.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Lynn Greer is one of the anti-franchises in city scholastic basketball. He doesn't show off, doesn't run his mouth, doesn't shirk his classroom responsibilities, doesn't threaten to transfer any time he is not passed the ball on three consecutive trips down the court. What he does is play hard with team goals in mind when wearing a uniform, and behave like a model citizen, unceasingly, when wearing street clothes. Lynn Greer is what can happen when a youngster receives loving and persistent familial support.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Abbe Klebanoff, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown supervisors have approved pay increases for the township's solicitor and its engineers despite objections from a supervisor who wanted a study conducted to see whether the increases would be a burden to the taxpayers. The supervisors voted, 3-1, Tuesday to enact a resolution calling for the increase. Board member George Marcellus, the lone dissenter, said he wanted to postpone the raises until the township could research the financial effect. "I think we are talking significant money," he said.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
It was "purely accidental" that Richard Kellerman and Paul Nielsen developed an electronic system that would help rowers all over the world. The two men were working for Xerox Corp. in 1978 when the rowing coach at the University of Pennsylvania, a friend of a friend, started bringing Kellerman things that needed fixing. Kellerman, a chemical engineer, passed most of the odd jobs on to Nielsen, a physical engineer. The two tinkered away and realized that they probably could make most of the things they were repairing.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
It's still January, but it has already been a long season for Lincoln basketball fans. With Engineering and Science visiting Tuesday, most fans - and Lincoln coach Charlie Davis - had hoped that the Railsplitters could notch their first league win of the year. But the Engineers (5-9 overall, 2-6 league) jumped out to a 13-point lead after three quarters and held off Lincoln (3-14, 0-7), 71-65. "It was a game that I hoped we would win," Davis said. "I thought this was one game that was sort of even, talentwise.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Gaby Rochino knew she wasn't the only Rowan University student struggling to get through a particularly difficult engineering class - "I'd study nine hours a night and I'd still get a C on a quiz" - but she still felt alone. "Imagine sitting in a classroom, and nobody in your classroom looks like you. Rowan itself is very un-diverse, so mostly everyone around me was a Caucasian male," said Rochino, 21, of Cherry Hill. "It's just devastating looking around the room, thinking, 'Maybe I'm not cut out for this, maybe I'm not made for this, maybe girls can't do engineering,' " she said.
SPORTS
January 6, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, Staff Writer
Jerry Colangelo continues to reshape the 76ers. The new chairman of basketball operations pushed for Elton Brand to sign with the team, the same way he orchestrated the hiring of Mike D'Antoni as associate head coach and the trade for point guard Ish Smith. "I think with Jerry's connections with Coach K [Mike Krzyzewski] and [Brand's agent] David Falk, that [helped] our desire to maybe bring in more senior voices in the program," Sixers coach Brett Brown said of the signing of Brand, who played for Krzyzewski at Duke.
NEWS
December 26, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
The next time you drag a grocery item over the bar code scanner, remember Francis Xavier Beck Jr. Mr. Beck, 89, of West Chester, who helped develop the checkout method that made shopping much faster, died Sunday, Dec. 20, from complications of a stroke. Born in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., Mr. Beck was attending Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1944 when he volunteered to serve in the Navy. He was assigned to the Huntington, a Fargo-class light cruiser, and he received the American Theater Medal and the Victory Medal.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During Hurricane Agnes in 1972, Samuel B. Hess figured that the safest place for his 25-foot sailboat would be on the water. And so with his family onboard, he maneuvered his craft from his dock near Chestertown, Md., into the Chester River. "There was mom, my brother, and me and my dog, a beagle," said Mr. Hess' daughter, Julie Hughes, all onboard. "The waters were pretty darn high," Hughes said, but they all saw it through. "We were all being tossed around," she said, "but he knew what he was doing.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Wehle, 90, formerly of Narberth, a civil engineer for the state Department of Transportation, died Monday, Nov. 23, at Blue Bell Place after a bout with pneumonia. Mr. Wehle led a life full of what he liked to call "ordinary adventure. " He attended school in New London, Conn. On May 23, 1939, he was in math class when students began flocking to the windows and cheering. Steaming past them down the Thames River was the Falcon, a former minesweeper on its way to reach 59 sailors trapped aboard the submarine Squalus, which was disabled on the ocean floor off Portsmouth, N.H. "It was a sight he never forgot," said daughter Ellen.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2015
Walking through the halls of family-owned Day & Zimmermann's headquarters on Spring Garden Street is like walking through a history lesson, with the company's chairman and chief executive, Harold "Hal" L. Yoh 3d, 54, as the professor. There's a yellowed photograph of the Gatun lock on the Panama Canal, an early assignment - 1908 - for the contract engineering, technical staffing, and construction management firm that has grown, in part, through acquisition over the decades. In 1914, the company designed the machine that wraps the Hershey Kiss in foil, and 50 years later, in 1964, it made the New York World's Fair monorail.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A life celebration is to be Friday, Nov. 13, for Harry Edward Lauderdale Jr., 77, the former chief plant engineer for the Philadelphia School District. A Philadelphia resident, he died Wednesday, Oct. 28, of complications from diabetes at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Lauderdale joined the city's school system in 1959 as an assistant district engineer. In 1967, he was promoted to district engineer, and by 1972 was named chief of plant engineering and training. He also served as chairman of the district engineers' group, and of the energy committee for the maintenance department.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Kosich, 84, of Cherry Hill, who retired as a missile systems engineer at Lockheed Martin in Moorestown, died of dementia on Thursday, Oct. 29, at CareOne at Evesham, an assisted-living center in Marlton. Mr. Kosich grew up in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia, graduated from Northeast High School in 1948, and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania in 1952. He was an engineer in the Camden offices of Radio Corp.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A structural engineer testified Friday that the deadly demolition of a four-story Center City building had been handled well for weeks, but then, for unknown reasons, changed course with no regard for "common sense" or federal safety standards. Prosecution witness David B. Peraza said he did not know why contractor Griffin Campbell shifted from taking down the building using hand tools to using an excavator, a large and unwieldy piece of machinery. The change in approach came just a few days before June 5, 2013, when an unsupported four-story wall fell onto the adjoining Salvation Army thrift shop, killing six people and injuring 13. But a review of affidavits and other evidence led Peraza to conclude that decisions about how to demolish the building next to the thrift store rested not with property owner Richard Basciano, but were "within the domain and the control of the contractor," the engineer told the Common Pleas Court jury hearing Campbell's murder trial.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Tickner, 83, a retired project engineer and a genealogist who traced his family's arrival in America back to 1638, died Monday, Oct. 5, of multiple myeloma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Susquehanna, Pa., to Robert N. Tickner and Marion Benson, Mr. Tickner served in the Navy during the Korean War. Afterward, he earned a bachelor of science and a master's degree, both in engineering, at Pennsylvania State University. He worked as an engineer at Sealtest, the ice cream maker, before joining Campbell Soup Co. in Camden as a project engineer in 1965.
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