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NEWS
June 29, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
The military company at the Naval Ship Systems Engineering Station stands at ease during a ceremony installing Capt. Robert J. Hogan as commander. The station, at the Navy Base, is open and employs about 1,600 engineers, scientists, technicians and support staff.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's official - almost. After several months of public comment - and protest - and several returns to the drawing board, engineers designing the interchange of Interstate 95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike have selected the designs they think should move into the next phase of development. The designs, which include controversial plans that favor commercial property and open space rather than homes, must be approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the federal Highway Commission and environmental agencies.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2011 | By Susanne M. Schafer, Associated Press
GREENVILLE, S.C. - The chairman of President Obama's jobs and competitiveness council said Wednesday that there was no magic potion to jobs creation but said the panel was devising pragmatic plans to put people back to work. The chairman, Jeffrey Immelt, who is also chief executive officer of General Electric Co., spoke with employees and reporters during a visit to his company's gas-turbine plant in Greenville, which employs 3,300 people, including 1,700 engineers. Immelt said the panel was working on devising different business plans for every sector of the economy, with practical steps to help create jobs.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No canaries work for CDI Corp., the $926.3 million Center City company that serves as a temporary-staffing service for companies that need engineers and information technology specialists. But they may as well. Because, just as the canary signals trouble in the mine shaft, CDI's financials sing out what's next in the economy. Their song? An economy on the mend, but slowly. CDI's harbinger status derives from the fact that just more than half its revenue comes from putting engineers to work.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | BY MARK Z. HANLON
By the year 2010, our country could face a staggering shortfall of more than 500,000 engineers. Without skilled scientists and engineers, will we be able to compete with the Japanese or Europeans? Can we solve critical problems such as the infrastructure, water and air pollution and global warming? These dictate the need for many more technical workers. Why isn't this country producing enough engineers to meet the need? Reasons include the general decline in mathematical skills of our high school students, a poor perception of what engineers and scientists really do, a lack of appreciation for the services they perform, and lower salaries than other professions such as medicine and law. Engineering is an exciting and challenging profession.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
GREENVILLE, MISS. - Another barge grounding near Greenville, Miss., has closed the Mississippi River to shipping. As of Sunday afternoon, 18 vessels were waiting to head north and 21 waited to head south. The river carries water from more than 40 percent of the United States. Widespread drought has starved it of rainwater, and the Army Corps of Engineers already had planned to close the river for 12 hours Monday for dredging near Baton Rouge, La. - Associated Press
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | By Mary Elizabeth DeAngelis, Special to The Inquirer
The Davey Co. of Downingtown must seek a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers before it can build a storage warehouse in a flood plain. At a hearing Tuesday, township engineer Garfield Smith told the East Caln Zoning Hearing Board that he saw no harm in granting the Davey Co. a variance to construct part of its building below a flood plain as long as the company agrees to a set of conditions. Besides contacting the Corps of Engineers, the company would have to submit plans that include proposals for soil and erosion control.
NEWS
December 10, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas H. Lipscomb, 94, a retired Army major general and former director of the Delaware River Port Authority, died recently of heart failure at the Evergreens, a retirement home in Moorestown. His wife of 62 years, Louise Heiss Lipscomb, had died three weeks earlier. A native of Mississippi, Mr. Lipscomb graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he was a member of the fencing and track teams. He then served in Army posts in the South and in California and earned a master's degree from Cornell University in civil engineering.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Amy Silverman, Special to The Inquirer
The Army Corps of Engineers has given Phoenixville residents a view of plans to investigate possible contamination at the former site of the Valley Forge General Hospital. But residents greeted the presentation Wednesday night with skepticism and more than an hour of detailed, sometimes angry questioning. During the two-hour meeting in the Phoenixville High School library, about 50 residents and local politicians listened as Rick Wilson, the Corps' rapid- response team leader for the investigation, described how engineers will examine the groundwater and soil in the old hospital site, searching for evidence of organic compounds, pesticides, metals and dioxins on a standard list.
NEWS
September 16, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As SEPTA struggles to find enough engineers to keep its trains running, Bucks County Community College is offering an eight-week introductory course in basic railroading at its Newtown campus. Students learn operating rules, air-brake theory, locomotive operation and other basics, according to instructor Mark Mattis, an engineer who is a senior training specialist with NJ Transit. The course, Locomotive Engineer and Conductor Basic Training, is the only offering of its kind in the region, Mattis said.
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