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NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By John Boudreau, San Jose Mercury News
BEIJING - Google may appear to be under siege in China, but a sense of normalcy - Google style - pervades the company's headquarters here. Googlers, when they aren't writing codes or working on new advertising strategies, line up for five-star meals, attend in-house yoga classes, and pedal mini bicycles down hallways at the 10-floor outpost. The Mountain View-based search giant recently opened the doors of its Beijing facility to the San Jose Mercury News to give a rare glimpse of its operations since its continuing skirmishes with the Chinese government got under way more than a year ago. At one point even the Obama administration got involved, expressing concern over allegations that Google was targeted by a flurry of cyberattacks in December 2009.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | For The Inquirer / NANCY WEGARD
The 305th Wing Command at McGuire Air Force Base is getting set to dedicate a new control tower. Yesterday, the tower loomed over (from left) Col. Paul Schutt, Col. Gary Thomas of the Army Corps of Engineers, and Lt. Gen. Ed Tenoso.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's official - almost. After several months of public comment - and protest - and several returns to the drawing board, engineers designing the interchange of Interstate 95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike have selected the designs they think should move into the next phase of development. The designs, which include controversial plans that favor commercial property and open space rather than homes, must be approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the federal Highway Commission and environmental agencies.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2011 | By Susanne M. Schafer, Associated Press
GREENVILLE, S.C. - The chairman of President Obama's jobs and competitiveness council said Wednesday that there was no magic potion to jobs creation but said the panel was devising pragmatic plans to put people back to work. The chairman, Jeffrey Immelt, who is also chief executive officer of General Electric Co., spoke with employees and reporters during a visit to his company's gas-turbine plant in Greenville, which employs 3,300 people, including 1,700 engineers. Immelt said the panel was working on devising different business plans for every sector of the economy, with practical steps to help create jobs.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | BY MARK Z. HANLON
By the year 2010, our country could face a staggering shortfall of more than 500,000 engineers. Without skilled scientists and engineers, will we be able to compete with the Japanese or Europeans? Can we solve critical problems such as the infrastructure, water and air pollution and global warming? These dictate the need for many more technical workers. Why isn't this country producing enough engineers to meet the need? Reasons include the general decline in mathematical skills of our high school students, a poor perception of what engineers and scientists really do, a lack of appreciation for the services they perform, and lower salaries than other professions such as medicine and law. Engineering is an exciting and challenging profession.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
GREENVILLE, MISS. - Another barge grounding near Greenville, Miss., has closed the Mississippi River to shipping. As of Sunday afternoon, 18 vessels were waiting to head north and 21 waited to head south. The river carries water from more than 40 percent of the United States. Widespread drought has starved it of rainwater, and the Army Corps of Engineers already had planned to close the river for 12 hours Monday for dredging near Baton Rouge, La. - Associated Press
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | By Mary Elizabeth DeAngelis, Special to The Inquirer
The Davey Co. of Downingtown must seek a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers before it can build a storage warehouse in a flood plain. At a hearing Tuesday, township engineer Garfield Smith told the East Caln Zoning Hearing Board that he saw no harm in granting the Davey Co. a variance to construct part of its building below a flood plain as long as the company agrees to a set of conditions. Besides contacting the Corps of Engineers, the company would have to submit plans that include proposals for soil and erosion control.
NEWS
December 10, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas H. Lipscomb, 94, a retired Army major general and former director of the Delaware River Port Authority, died recently of heart failure at the Evergreens, a retirement home in Moorestown. His wife of 62 years, Louise Heiss Lipscomb, had died three weeks earlier. A native of Mississippi, Mr. Lipscomb graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he was a member of the fencing and track teams. He then served in Army posts in the South and in California and earned a master's degree from Cornell University in civil engineering.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Because he can fire a baseball over the plate inning after relentless inning, Phillies ace Roy Halladay is sometimes likened to a machine. With all appropriate deference to the reigning Cy Young Award winner, he is no machine. Meet PhillieBot, a one-armed, three-wheeled contraption that is scheduled to throw out the ceremonial first pitch before Wednesday's game against the Milwaukee Brewers. It is a robot built by University of Pennsylvania engineers as the headline attraction for Science Day at the Ballpark.
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