CollectionsEngineers
IN THE NEWS

Engineers

NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Wallingford resident David E. Pergrin has been granted a rare honor by the Army Corps of Engineers for his service in World War II, and for the contribution he has made in developing training materials for the Corps since then. Pergrin, a retired civil engineer, was named a Distinguished Member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, an honor that has been granted only once before. Pergrin was a 26-year-old colonel during the Second World War in command of the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion.
SPORTS
January 31, 2002 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After every Engineering and Science player spilled onto the court in celebration, and after the initial shock wore off, the question begged to be asked: How in the world did Beth Godino get that open? With the score tied at 52 and 1.3 seconds left to play yesterday in a Public League girls' basketball game at University City, the Engineers had to inbound the ball from midcourt. Bunched together at midcourt with her teammates and five UC defenders, Godino set a pick for Engineers senior Aquisha Cahoe, then broke for the basket.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | For The Inquirer / NANCY WEGARD
The 305th Wing Command at McGuire Air Force Base is getting set to dedicate a new control tower. Yesterday, the tower loomed over (from left) Col. Paul Schutt, Col. Gary Thomas of the Army Corps of Engineers, and Lt. Gen. Ed Tenoso.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's official - almost. After several months of public comment - and protest - and several returns to the drawing board, engineers designing the interchange of Interstate 95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike have selected the designs they think should move into the next phase of development. The designs, which include controversial plans that favor commercial property and open space rather than homes, must be approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the federal Highway Commission and environmental agencies.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2011 | By Susanne M. Schafer, Associated Press
GREENVILLE, S.C. - The chairman of President Obama's jobs and competitiveness council said Wednesday that there was no magic potion to jobs creation but said the panel was devising pragmatic plans to put people back to work. The chairman, Jeffrey Immelt, who is also chief executive officer of General Electric Co., spoke with employees and reporters during a visit to his company's gas-turbine plant in Greenville, which employs 3,300 people, including 1,700 engineers. Immelt said the panel was working on devising different business plans for every sector of the economy, with practical steps to help create jobs.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | BY MARK Z. HANLON
By the year 2010, our country could face a staggering shortfall of more than 500,000 engineers. Without skilled scientists and engineers, will we be able to compete with the Japanese or Europeans? Can we solve critical problems such as the infrastructure, water and air pollution and global warming? These dictate the need for many more technical workers. Why isn't this country producing enough engineers to meet the need? Reasons include the general decline in mathematical skills of our high school students, a poor perception of what engineers and scientists really do, a lack of appreciation for the services they perform, and lower salaries than other professions such as medicine and law. Engineering is an exciting and challenging profession.
NEWS
March 11, 2012
William C. Kashatus is a historian and writer On March 17, 1862, Gen. George B. McClellan, commander of the Army of the Potomac, began to move his 70,000 soldiers from Washington down the Chesapeake Bay to Fortress Monroe on the James River Peninsula to launch a surprise attack on the Confederate capital at Richmond. It was expected to be the deciding battle of the American Civil War. Instead, the Peninsula Campaign ended in failure, creating an irreparable rift between President Abraham Lincoln and the general he once believed would lead the Union to victory.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
GREENVILLE, MISS. - Another barge grounding near Greenville, Miss., has closed the Mississippi River to shipping. As of Sunday afternoon, 18 vessels were waiting to head north and 21 waited to head south. The river carries water from more than 40 percent of the United States. Widespread drought has starved it of rainwater, and the Army Corps of Engineers already had planned to close the river for 12 hours Monday for dredging near Baton Rouge, La. - Associated Press
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | By Mary Elizabeth DeAngelis, Special to The Inquirer
The Davey Co. of Downingtown must seek a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers before it can build a storage warehouse in a flood plain. At a hearing Tuesday, township engineer Garfield Smith told the East Caln Zoning Hearing Board that he saw no harm in granting the Davey Co. a variance to construct part of its building below a flood plain as long as the company agrees to a set of conditions. Besides contacting the Corps of Engineers, the company would have to submit plans that include proposals for soil and erosion control.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|