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Engineers

NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
One way to make a retirement day worthwhile might be to help a few youngsters launch a rocket from a park in Camden. On May 11, William P. Rogers, a retired electrical engineer, was there as an adviser to an after-school group from UrbanPromise Academy, a Christian nondenominational high school in Camden. "He worked on that for a couple of months" with members of the school's chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers Jr., his wife, Lynne, said. Marcus Bell, a special projects coordinator for UrbanPromise, explained that "with his background in engineering, he was a great help to us in math and science.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles White Conklin Jr., 82, an engineer and longtime resident of Springfield, Delaware County, died in a one-car accident Thursday, May 15, in Marshall, Va., near his retirement home. Mr. Conklin's vehicle veered off a rural road and crashed into trees. Local officials had not determined a cause. He was born in Smithfield, Va., and graduated from Smithfield High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and followed that with graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Patsko, 86, formerly of Bryn Mawr, a chemical engineer, died Tuesday, May 27, of multiple myeloma at Kendal Crosslands in Kennett Square. Throughout his career, Mr. Patsko worked on chemical applications for the printing industry. Several were patented in the 1960s and 1970s. His work in photo engraving research, development, and technical sales took him to major newspaper customers worldwide. He was based at Master Etching Machine Co. in Ambler for two decades before moving to Park Forest, Ill.; Plymouth, Mass.; and Prairie Village, Kan. He returned to the Philadelphia suburbs and retired in 2000, his family said.
NEWS
June 1, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The aorta is a marvel of elasticity, expanding and contracting millions of times a year to accommodate the pumping action of the heart. Yet the body's largest artery is not so elastic when a metal block slams into it at nearly 30 m.p.h. This is what Kurosh Darvish does in a lab at Temple University, again and again, in an effort to make cars safer. SKREEEEeeeee . . . BANG!! An associate professor of mechanical engineering, Darvish and his graduate students have rigged up an elaborate, 19-foot aluminum track where they can simulate the violent impacts of a car crash.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred L. Glaudel, 90, of West Chester, a retired engineering manager for Westinghouse Electric Corp., died at his home Thursday, May 22, of complications from a heart ailment. He had moved to West Chester in 2008 to be with his daughter Annette after many years living in Lansdowne. Mr. Glaudel was born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, the youngest of 11 children. He graduated from Mahanoy City High School, and served in the Navy from 1943 to 1946 during World War II. He was deployed to the Pacific Theater aboard the submarine USS Haddock.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Engineers who operate SEPTA Regional Rail trains will soon vote on authorizing a strike, the national office of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen said Friday. The engineers, as well as SEPTA railroad electrical workers represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 744, are in a federally mandated 30-day "cooling off" period that will end June 14. After that, it is likely that a presidential emergency board will be created to investigate the long-running labor dispute; that would delay a strike or lock-out by up to 240 days.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Breiling, 91, of Malvern, a World War II veteran and electrical engineer, died Thursday, May 1, of liver failure at Phoenixville Hospital's hospice unit. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he studied at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., in the late 1940s and earned a bachelor of science degree in physics in 1953. He volunteered for the Army Air Forces and served from 1944 to 1946 as a B-17 pilot, flying bombing missions over Kolin, Czechoslovakia. He logged 400 hours as a B-17 pilot.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They got tired of lugging and wrestling with their bike locks, so they stopped riding entirely. Therein lay the germ of an idea for a group of seniors majoring in mechanical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania: Why not devise a bike lock you don't have to carry? This is senior-project presentation season for engineering students at schools such as Penn and Drexel University, when teams are evaluated on their ability to solve problems with elegance and simplicity. Diagnose the flu in less than 10 minutes, at a cost of $3. Treat spinal cord injuries with stem cells.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail engineers moved a step closer to being able to strike early next year, after the National Mediation Board on Thursday ended its efforts to broker an agreement. The board on Thursday declared an impasse in negotiations and suggested the two sides submit their long-running dispute to binding arbitration. The 220 engineers, represented by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, said they would accept arbitration, but SEPTA will not, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.
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