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Engineers

NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They got tired of lugging and wrestling with their bike locks, so they stopped riding entirely. Therein lay the germ of an idea for a group of seniors majoring in mechanical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania: Why not devise a bike lock you don't have to carry? This is senior-project presentation season for engineering students at schools such as Penn and Drexel University, when teams are evaluated on their ability to solve problems with elegance and simplicity. Diagnose the flu in less than 10 minutes, at a cost of $3. Treat spinal cord injuries with stem cells.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail engineers moved a step closer to being able to strike early next year, after the National Mediation Board on Thursday ended its efforts to broker an agreement. The board on Thursday declared an impasse in negotiations and suggested the two sides submit their long-running dispute to binding arbitration. The 220 engineers, represented by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, said they would accept arbitration, but SEPTA will not, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edit L. Egyed, 78, of Philadelphia, an electrical engineer who worked for the City of Philadelphia for many years, died Monday, March 24, of a heart attack at Holy Redeemer Hospital. As a licensed professional engineer, Mrs. Egyed was one of very few women in the 1960s to train and find work in the male-dominated profession. She was born in Budapest, Hungary, and immigrated to America in 1956. She enrolled at Purdue University's engineering school and when she graduated was only the seventh woman to earn a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Purdue.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Strip's natural aptitude for the German language eventually took him to the interrogation rooms of World War II and the tense courtrooms of the Nuremberg Trials. At 17, he was just trying to leave Europe for good. Mr. Strip, 90, of Cherry Hill, died at Cooper University Hospital in Camden on Wednesday, March 26, after suffering a fall. As German paratroopers cascaded from the skies, Mr. Strip and his family - his father, mother, and younger brother - boarded a truck and bolted their native Belgium.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry C. Broadley, 89, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime engineer for the Christian Schmidt Brewing Co. who turned the key in the lock on the brewery's final day, ending an era, died Wednesday, March 12, of heart disease at Riddle Memorial Hospital. From 1955 to 1989, Mr. Broadley was the director of engineering for Schmidt's brewery, at Second and Hancock Streets in Northern Liberties. In its heyday, the plant was a Philadelphia institution. Started in 1860, Schmidt's grew until by 1970 it was producing more than three million barrels of beer annually.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Adler, 60, of Cherry Hill, a devoted husband and father with a love for computers, died at his home Sunday, March 16, after a five-month battle with lung cancer. "He fought a graceful, dignified battle against lung cancer," his wife, Betty, said Monday. "He had excruciating pain the last five months. " Betty Adler, a health lawyer for the University of Pennsylvania/Penn Medicine and president of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, said she and her husband knew each other from childhood.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip G. Damm Sr., 92, of Ambler, a community volunteer and former plant engineer for Merck & Co., died Saturday, March 8, of a heart ailment at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Damm worked for 35 years at the drug firm in West Point. His niche was maintaining sterile environments for drug manufacturing, helping to mass-produce vaccines against measles, mumps, rubella, and influenza. He volunteered in the 1950s and '60s on the North Penn Water Authority, where he helped to develop a public water system for the area.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William A. Benning, 76, of Malvern, a project engineer who rose to become an executive for a valve manufacturing company, died Saturday, March 1, of cancer at home. Before retiring in 1999, Mr. Benning was employed for 43 years by the same company, Darling Valve & Manufacturing Co. in Williamsport, Pa. He was hired as a project engineer in 1956. The firm started out making fire hydrants and over time became a valve maker for various industries. Mr. Benning changed with the times and "just was a loyal, loyal guy," said his wife, the former Jean E. Nardi.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pei Chi Chou, 89, a nationally known engineering professor and a leader in the local Chinese American community, died of heart failure Thursday, Feb. 13, at Shannondell at Valley Forge in Audubon, Montgomery County, where he had resided for the last few years. Born in China's Hubei province in 1924, Mr. Chou came to the United States for graduate study in 1947, earning advanced degrees at Harvard and New York Universities, and soon decided to forge a career here. He joined Drexel University as an assistant professor of engineering in 1953.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John A. Lepore, 78, of Springfield, Delaware County, a civil engineer who found his life's purpose in teaching, died Friday, Feb. 14, of Alzheimer's disease at Riddle Memorial Hospital's skilled nursing center in Media. A South Philadelphia native, Mr. Lepore attended South Philadelphia High School. He earned a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from what is now Drexel University and a master's degree and a doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.
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