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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
The National Transportation Safety Board says the engineer of the doomed Amtrak Train 188 apparently did not radio his dispatchers that his train had been hit by a projectile just before it careened off the tracks at the Frankford curve in Port Richmond. A review of taped conversations by the engineer, Brandon Bostian, to dispatchers shows no mention of anything hitting his train, as one of his assistant conductors has reported. NTSB's Robert Sumwalt, the lead investigator of the fatal derailment, said the Amtrak dispatchers were also interviewed about a possible report of a projectile impact.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, DANA DiFILIPPO & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE MAN WHO could best explain why Amtrak Train 188 quickly accelerated to twice the speed limit Tuesday night just before it careened off the tracks at the sharp curve at Frankford Junction - killing eight people and injuring roughly 200 others - reportedly has told his attorney that he doesn't remember what happened. Robert Goggin, the Philadelphia-based attorney for Amtrak engineer Brandon Bostian, 32, told ABC News yesterday that his client suffered a concussion and other injuries - and that although he was devastated to learn about so many dead and injured, he doesn't recall the derailment.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators of Tuesday's deadly Amtrak derailment say they are focusing on reports that the train was traveling more than twice the 50-mile-an-hour speed limit when it entered a sharp curve in Frankford. An automatic train control system designed to prevent speeding was not in place where Amtrak Train 188 crashed, killing seven people and injuring more than 200. The train's engineer, who has not been identified, declined to give a statement to police investigators and left the East Detectives Division with an attorney, police commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE look at the moon and think, isn't that pretty. Louis Diodoro looked at the moon and said, "Let's go there!" Louis was an aeronautical engineer with General Electric for nearly 30 years, working on many key aspects of America's space exploration. His department designed and built the nose cones for the rockets that, in 1961, first sent a chimp into space, and then in July 1969 - the culmination of an aeronautical engineer's dream- sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in the Apollo 11 program.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Carpenter Bowen Sr., 87, of Huntingdon Valley, a retired chemical engineer, died Tuesday, April 14, in the medical center at Rydal Park, a senior community, of complications from an earlier surgery. Born in Bristol, he was the son of Charles and Beatrice Bowen. The family moved to Moorestown, where Mr. Bowen became active in the Boy Scouts. He achieved the rank of Life Scout and was elected to the Order of the Arrow Brotherhood by members of his troop, his family said in a statement.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So frustrating. Budding engineers on the eight-person King Magikarps crew of the Harrison Middle School's Seabots underwater robot team thought they had considered everything in designing their underwater robot entered in Saturday's SeaPerch competition at Rowan University. They didn't expect an underwater referee's legs to get in the way, kicking up turbulence, and they didn't expect to score so low - 14 out of 24 points. "Bad things will always come your way," said Andrew McCorkle, team manager, slumping his shoulders after their robot's turn under the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One would like to imagine that, as electrical engineers in the same group at Lockheed Martin, Michael Petner and Tuan Ngo are quick to offer each other words of encouragement. But is it always quite so boisterous? "Think light!" Petner shouted at Ngo on Tuesday. "Just keep those legs up. Good job!" The 145-pound Ngo grinned gamely in reply. It might have been partly a grimace. After all, he was stuck to a cinder-block wall with duct tape. At the defense contractor's Moorestown facility, employees are participating in National Engineers Week, a celebration of a discipline that too often goes without credit for its creativity and sense of humor.
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