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NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Jonathan Tamari, STAFF WRITERS
The engineer whose Amtrak train derailed last May in Philadelphia, killing eight people, was likely distracted as he sped to more than 100 m.p.h, a yearlong federal investigation will conclude Tuesday, according to network television reports and a congressional source briefed on the findings. Among the possible reasons the engineer may have lost his bearings was radio chatter several minutes before the train hurtled off a curve, according to a second source familiar with the study by the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
An Allentown engineering-firm executive has become the latest figure tied to an ongoing pay-to-play probe that has already implicated business owners, political operatives, public officials, and mayors in two Pennsylvania cities. Matthew McTish, president of McTish, Kunkel & Associates, pleaded guilty in federal court in Philadelphia last week to conspiracy to commit bribery, according to filings unsealed Tuesday. McTish admitted that he gave more than $9,000 in campaign contributions and helped raised thousands more over the last six years for public officials in Allentown and Reading after they threatened to cut off his company's access to contracts if he did not financially support their campaigns.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
A triangular tract of now mostly vacant land that was the engine of Merchantville's growth in the 19th century could be the key to the borough's future. "This is the last developable site in town," says Mayor Ted Brennan, a lawyer, a father of four, and an energetic proponent of a renewed effort to strengthen the Camden County suburb's somewhat faded heart. "We want to build something that will stand the test of time," adds the mayor, whose father, Patrick, served in the same role from 1995 until 2006.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When he was 13, Philip Snyder got a homegrown lesson in electrical engineering. "One of his brothers taught him how to take apart broken doorbells and clean the connections so they would work again," said a niece, Gail Snyder. One of Mr. Snyder's proudest accomplishments "was that he was able to rewire an entire house when he was a teenager," said Jack Porter, a Wynnewood clinical psychologist, who grew up near Mr. Snyder's home near Third and Wolf Streets in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
In space, no one can hear you scream when your battery dies. Out there, options are pretty limited. "In space, there are very limited power sources. You either have to carry your batteries with you - which is in most cases impractical - or by and large in space, you would rely on light, on sun," said Robi Polikar, head of the electrical and computer engineering department at Rowan University. And there are all those other issues to think about when it comes to electronics: the physical size of the equipment (the larger and heavier, the harder to get into space)
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John A. Quinn, 83, of Merion, a chemical engineer and professor known fondly to students as "Dr. Q," died Monday, Feb. 8, at Lankenau Hospital, where he had been taken after collapsing at home. Dr. Quinn had a long and distinguished career. He joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in the early 1970s and never really retired. He was given the university's S. Reid Warren Jr. Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1974 and the Robert D. Bent Professorship in 1978. He was chairman of the department of chemical and biochemical engineering from 1980 to 1985.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2016
Call it a clash of cultures. The investigation into the horrific crash of Amtrak Train 188 on May 12, 2015, is proceeding along two paths, and the two couldn't be more different. The National Transportation Safety Board so far has taken the lead, opening its probe one day after the crash. Its cautious and collaborative approach to rail and aircraft disasters has won praise for encouraging witnesses to open up, but also criticism for seeming to pull punches. Dozens of personal-injury lawyers also want a crack at explaining what happened, and have filed 111 lawsuits involving the crash.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Gene W. Chilton, 90, of Deptford, a civil engineer and former owner of a survey and design firm in Cherry Hill, died Wednesday, Feb. 3, at his home. Mr. Chilton was the oldest trustee at North Baptist Church in Woodbury, which he had joined in 1957, daughter Doris Chilton said. After being baptized that year, she said, he was named to the church trustee board in 1958. A Sunday School teacher in his early years at North Baptist, his daughter said, Mr. Chilton had fond memories of ringing the church bell before classes.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Brandon Bostian, the engineer on the ill-fated Amtraktrain that crashed May 12, gave investigators sharply differing accounts of what he recalls of the moments before the crash, raising questions about his credibility, two prominent plaintiffs said Monday. Tom Kline and Robert Mongelluzzi said at a press conference that inconsistencies in Bostian's story underscore the need for Bostian to be deposed under oath. Mongeluzzi's firm represents 17 passengers who have filed claims, while Kline & Specter represents 12 victims, including two death claims.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Federal investigators will open a new window into the deadly Amtrak Train 188 derailment in Philadelphia when they release a trove of documents Monday, including interview transcripts with the engineer. Those interviews could provide the most detailed view yet of Brandon Bostian, the engineer running the train in May when it sped to 106 m.p.h. - more than twice the speed limit for an approaching curve - before hurtling off the tracks in Frankford Junction, killing eight and injuring more than 200. Bostian's lawyer has said the engineer does not remember the crash.
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