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NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During Hurricane Agnes in 1972, Samuel B. Hess figured that the safest place for his 25-foot sailboat would be on the water. And so with his family onboard, he maneuvered his craft from his dock near Chestertown, Md., into the Chester River. "There was mom, my brother, and me and my dog, a beagle," said Mr. Hess' daughter, Julie Hughes, all onboard. "The waters were pretty darn high," Hughes said, but they all saw it through. "We were all being tossed around," she said, "but he knew what he was doing.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Wehle, 90, formerly of Narberth, a civil engineer for the state Department of Transportation, died Monday, Nov. 23, at Blue Bell Place after a bout with pneumonia. Mr. Wehle led a life full of what he liked to call "ordinary adventure. " He attended school in New London, Conn. On May 23, 1939, he was in math class when students began flocking to the windows and cheering. Steaming past them down the Thames River was the Falcon, a former minesweeper on its way to reach 59 sailors trapped aboard the submarine Squalus, which was disabled on the ocean floor off Portsmouth, N.H. "It was a sight he never forgot," said daughter Ellen.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2015
Walking through the halls of family-owned Day & Zimmermann's headquarters on Spring Garden Street is like walking through a history lesson, with the company's chairman and chief executive, Harold "Hal" L. Yoh 3d, 54, as the professor. There's a yellowed photograph of the Gatun lock on the Panama Canal, an early assignment - 1908 - for the contract engineering, technical staffing, and construction management firm that has grown, in part, through acquisition over the decades. In 1914, the company designed the machine that wraps the Hershey Kiss in foil, and 50 years later, in 1964, it made the New York World's Fair monorail.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A life celebration is to be Friday, Nov. 13, for Harry Edward Lauderdale Jr., 77, the former chief plant engineer for the Philadelphia School District. A Philadelphia resident, he died Wednesday, Oct. 28, of complications from diabetes at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Lauderdale joined the city's school system in 1959 as an assistant district engineer. In 1967, he was promoted to district engineer, and by 1972 was named chief of plant engineering and training. He also served as chairman of the district engineers' group, and of the energy committee for the maintenance department.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Kosich, 84, of Cherry Hill, who retired as a missile systems engineer at Lockheed Martin in Moorestown, died of dementia on Thursday, Oct. 29, at CareOne at Evesham, an assisted-living center in Marlton. Mr. Kosich grew up in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia, graduated from Northeast High School in 1948, and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania in 1952. He was an engineer in the Camden offices of Radio Corp.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A structural engineer testified Friday that the deadly demolition of a four-story Center City building had been handled well for weeks, but then, for unknown reasons, changed course with no regard for "common sense" or federal safety standards. Prosecution witness David B. Peraza said he did not know why contractor Griffin Campbell shifted from taking down the building using hand tools to using an excavator, a large and unwieldy piece of machinery. The change in approach came just a few days before June 5, 2013, when an unsupported four-story wall fell onto the adjoining Salvation Army thrift shop, killing six people and injuring 13. But a review of affidavits and other evidence led Peraza to conclude that decisions about how to demolish the building next to the thrift store rested not with property owner Richard Basciano, but were "within the domain and the control of the contractor," the engineer told the Common Pleas Court jury hearing Campbell's murder trial.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Tickner, 83, a retired project engineer and a genealogist who traced his family's arrival in America back to 1638, died Monday, Oct. 5, of multiple myeloma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Susquehanna, Pa., to Robert N. Tickner and Marion Benson, Mr. Tickner served in the Navy during the Korean War. Afterward, he earned a bachelor of science and a master's degree, both in engineering, at Pennsylvania State University. He worked as an engineer at Sealtest, the ice cream maker, before joining Campbell Soup Co. in Camden as a project engineer in 1965.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For three days in 2013, an unbraced three-story brick wall left from a demolished Hoagie City building loomed over the Salvation Army thrift store at 22d and Market Streets. Why it stood that long before falling over and flattening the thrift store - killing six and injuring 13 - was a question even structural engineer Richard D. Roberts couldn't answer. Roberts told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that the wall's condition was so precarious "it possibly could have blown over in a high wind.
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Perchick, 99, of Philadelphia, a management engineer for industry and with the U.S. Defense Department for many years, died Friday, Sept. 25, of respiratory failure at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born and reared in South Philadelphia, Mr. Perchick was a longtime resident of Center City. Starting in the 1970s, he lived along Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He moved to John F. Kennedy Boulevard in the early 2000s. He attended Temple University at night and worked at the Defense Supply Center.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU RARELY SAW Howard Wells without a camera around his neck. What started as a hobby eventually became a passion and ultimately a source of income. You weren't safe from the prying lens of Howard's camera. Nor would you want to be. His photographs captured the daily doings of his native city and its denizens. He also worked for a time for African-American newspapers the Philadelphia Tribune and the Afro-American, recording the events of the day, especially those of interest to African-Americans.
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