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NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Members of Congress pointedly questioned federal rail investigators Tuesday over why they still don't know whether the engineer operating Amtrak Train 188 was using his cellphone when it crashed in Philadelphia on May 12. Three weeks later, "I just don't understand what the holdup is," Rep. Barbara Comstock (R., Va.) said at the first congressional hearing into the derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Adding to lawmakers' frustration was that the National Transportation Safety Board has access to the engineer's cellphone and password, but has not nailed down an answer.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AMTRAK PLANS to install internal cameras on its trains in the Northeast Corridor, allowing them to monitor train engineers, the corporation announced yesterday. The new safety measure follows the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188, which left eight passengers dead and about 200 injured. An investigation led by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the train sped up from 70 to 102 mph as it approached a curve near Frankford Junction. A wide-angle camera will be added to each locomotive's cab, focusing on the engineer and the control console, Amtrak Spokesman Craig Schulz said.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University in Glassboro counts its engineering program as one of its premiere academic programs and has aggressive goals to expand enrollment. A few miles away, in nearby Deptford, Rowan College at Gloucester County is working to grow its own engineering science program, potentially doubling the number of freshmen in the pre-baccalaureate program in just two years. With both Rowan schools in Gloucester County looking to expand - and cut into a piece of the state's notorious annual "brain drain" of college students - school officials signed an agreement last week to align their engineering programs and create a road map for transfer.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cellphone of the engineer on Amtrak 188 was used the day of last week's deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday, but investigators are still trying to determine whether any of the activity took place during the doomed ride. In a brief investigative update posted on its website, the NTSB said that it had the cellphone of Brandon Bostian and that records indicated that "calls were made, text messages sent, and data used" on May 12. Still, the NTSB said, investigators have not determined exactly when the phone was used, and the process for reaching such conclusions is lengthy, involving the verification of time stamps across various data sources.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
The National Transportation Safety Board says the engineer of the doomed Amtrak Train 188 apparently did not radio his dispatchers that his train had been hit by a projectile just before it careened off the tracks at the Frankford curve in Port Richmond. A review of taped conversations by the engineer, Brandon Bostian, to dispatchers shows no mention of anything hitting his train, as one of his assistant conductors has reported. NTSB's Robert Sumwalt, the lead investigator of the fatal derailment, said the Amtrak dispatchers were also interviewed about a possible report of a projectile impact.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, DANA DiFILIPPO & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE MAN WHO could best explain why Amtrak Train 188 quickly accelerated to twice the speed limit Tuesday night just before it careened off the tracks at the sharp curve at Frankford Junction - killing eight people and injuring roughly 200 others - reportedly has told his attorney that he doesn't remember what happened. Robert Goggin, the Philadelphia-based attorney for Amtrak engineer Brandon Bostian, 32, told ABC News yesterday that his client suffered a concussion and other injuries - and that although he was devastated to learn about so many dead and injured, he doesn't recall the derailment.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators of Tuesday's deadly Amtrak derailment say they are focusing on reports that the train was traveling more than twice the 50-mile-an-hour speed limit when it entered a sharp curve in Frankford. An automatic train control system designed to prevent speeding was not in place where Amtrak Train 188 crashed, killing seven people and injuring more than 200. The train's engineer, who has not been identified, declined to give a statement to police investigators and left the East Detectives Division with an attorney, police commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Wednesday.
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