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NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Volunteer firefighters in Burlington County who lost their century-old headquarters five years ago are regaining a different piece of the past. The 1941 Ford truck that Franklin Fire Co. No. 1 sold in the 1970s and brought back home to Mansfield Township last year - after buying it on eBay - is being restored. The venerable apparatus will be used in parades and for educating kids about fire safety. "We were surprised it was still around," company president Doug Burgstrom says.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THAT WASN'T so hard, now was it? Cedar-Riverview LP, which owns South Philly's endangered Engine 46 firehouse, agreed yesterday to discuss the building's fate with local officials after the Daily News reported that residents and politicians were fed up with being left in the dark by the New York-based company. A demolition notice was tacked onto the vacant firehouse, at Reed and Water streets, earlier this week, indicating the 119-year-old property would be torn down on or after July 30. City Councilman Mark Squilla said he finally received a phone call from Bruce Schanzer, the president of Cedar Realty Trust, Cedar-Riverview's parent company.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Conrail had many more reports of problems with a railroad bridge in Paulsboro, N.J., before its collapse than the company has disclosed to accident investigators, a company locomotive engineer testified yesterday. The bridge collapsed in November as a freight train was crossing, derailing eight cars. A tank car punctured in the collapse leaked 20,000 gallons of vinyl chloride into a creek, which combined with the water to create a dangerous gas cloud. National Transportation Safety Board officials said at yesterday's investigative hearing that local police and fire officials who responded to the spill didn't follow safety standards, creating greater exposure to the gas for first responders and some residents.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard C. Walker, 88, of Glen Mills, a retired design engineer, died of lung cancer Wednesday, July 3, at his home. Mr. Walker was an electromechanical design engineer who worked for more than 30 years at the DuPont Engineering Design Laboratories in Wilmington. Born in Philadelphia's Lawndale section and raised in Fox Chase, Mr. Walker was a World War II veteran. He served with the Army Air Corps in India and the South Pacific, and was honorably discharged with the rank of sergeant.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dean A. Cucinotta, 47, of Haddonfield, a designer of helicopter equipment who had helped coach the Haddonfield Soccer Club since 2005, died of lung cancer Thursday, July 4, at his home. A 1984 graduate of Moorestown Friends School, Mr. Cucinotta earned a bachelor's degree in industrial design at Syracuse University in 1989. After running his own design firm for a few years, Mr. Cucinotta worked for Boeing Co. in Ridley Park for 19 years until retiring in June, his wife, Nicole, said Monday.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It has been an enduring challenge for the media - the old and the new - to produce ad-supported content without occasionally blurring the lines between that content and the advertising that supports it. But it has proved particularly vexing for the Web as it enters its third decade - a problem highlighted by a set of letters recently sent by the Federal Trade Commission to two dozen companies that perform Internet searches. More than a decade after first raising the issue, the FTC has retrained its spotlight on something that Internet companies would rather keep in the dark: growing evidence that search firms, including some of the industry's biggest names, are blurring the distinction between advertising and the information Web users expect them to deliver.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The challenge was to build a working prosthetic arm for an impossibly low price: less than $40 in materials. It took just one visit to Lowe's last fall for the West Philly middle schoolers to realize that meant cutting some painful corners. Appearances would have to go, for one. Forget about using all five fingers. But last week, four members of the team from Harambee Institute of Science and Technology capped seven months of invention and engineering trial and error with a triumph: Their arm won a second-place trophy at the National Engineering Design Competition of MESA USA in Portland, Ore. MESA, which stands for Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement and is funded largely by the Navy, is a decades-old program that is a newcomer to the region.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Robert Brehm A Philadelphia building collapses, people are killed, and the public demands reforms to prevent future tragedies. We have seen this sequence of events before. There are lessons to be learned, but not new ones. Engineers already know the inherent dangers of demolition and the reasons for such failures. The questions have been asked 100 times and answered 101 times. But the public outcry winds down, political will diminishes, and contractors complain that they are overregulated.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Thursday, June 13, for Edward Korostoff, 92, of Philadelphia, a research engineer and University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus. Dr. Korostoff died of atherosclerotic vascular disease Monday, May 13, at the Quadrangle in Haverford, where he had lived since 2005. Born in Philadelphia of Russian and Lithuanian parents, he entered Central High School for Boys at age 12 and the University of Pennsylvania at 16, graduating with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 1941.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Marcellino, 66, of Berwyn, an engineer who launched a second career as a lawyer, died Friday, May 31, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Early in his career, Mr. Marcellino earned dual master's degrees in mechanical engineering and business administration. He went to work for Curtiss-Wright Corp. and then spent 15 years as an engineer in the gas turbine division of Westinghouse Electric Corp. When the latter relocated to Orlando in 1986, Mr. Marcellino chose to stay in Pennsylvania and pursue a law degree at Temple University.
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