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Engineers

NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling a typical American engineering school a boys' club would be an understatement - on average, women make up 18.2 percent of engineering undergraduates nationwide. It's a statistic that hasn't gone unnoticed, with colleges and universities across the country scrambling to draw more women and minorities into engineering majors. Villanova University is no exception - and on Sunday, 31.4 percent of the engineering students who crossed the stage at graduation in Radnor were female.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Bond Godshalk, 98, of Lower Makefield Township, a chemical engineer and inventor, died Friday, May 3, at Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown, Bucks County. Born in Philadelphia, he was a Lower Makefield resident for 50 years. He was a descendant of John Howland, 13th signer of the Mayflower Compact in 1620. Mr. Godshalk lost his son, William Robert, 35, in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center attacks. An investment banker, the young man had become engaged shortly before his death.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Raymond Moser, 86, an aerospace engineer for General Electric, died Thursday, May 2, of pneumonia at the nursing skilled facility at Shannondell in Audubon. Mr. Moser's first job was as a design engineer for Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corp. in the mid-1950s. A longtime friend referred Mr. Moser to General Electric, where he worked from July 1956 until retiring in 1990. Sometimes his office was in Philadelphia; at other times, in King of Prussia. His family said that engineering was a passion for Mr. Moser and that he was "loyal and passionate about the company that employed him" for so many years.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF THAT BROKEN thing had wheels or moving parts or plugged into an electrical socket, Charlie Tagg could fix it. It didn't matter if it was a car, a TV set, a radio or toy train, his daughter Chris Jakielaszek said. "Dad found enjoyment tinkering and fixing a wide variety of items," she said. "He liked the challenge of making something work again and helping someone. He never charged anyone for the work he did. " Charles W. Tagg, a retired aerospace and aviation engineer, died April 29 of a heart ailment.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Edwin R. Walthall, witnessing a 1951 atomic bomb test as a physicist at Eniwetok Atoll in the South Pacific was not the first encounter with danger. Mr. Walthall was a nose gunner on B-17s for 21 missions deep into Nazi Germany during the last days of World War II. "We were lucky that no one in our crew got a scratch," he wrote in biographical notes for his family, "but some shrapnel penetrated our plane on several missions. " Only on his flight back to the United States did he face imminent peril, he wrote, when his plane landed in Gander, Newfoundland, with only three of its four engines working and low on fuel.
SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | BY BILL FLEISCHMAN, For the Daily News fleiscb@phillynews.com
ANOTHER WEEK, another significant smackdown from NASCAR's justice department. Matt Kenseth's No. 20 Toyota Sprint Cup team was the latest to hear a "guilty" verdict from NASCAR. Officials determined that the engine in Kenseth's winning car at Kansas Speedway on Sunday failed inspection. Kenseth was penalized 50 points yesterday, sending him spiraling from eighth place to a tie with Jeff Gordon for 14th place. Kenseth keeps the Kansas win, but he loses the three bonus points. While he keeps the victory in the record books, he cannot use it toward claiming a wild-card spot in the Chase.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank W. Wellons, 93, an engineering executive and former resident of the Philadelphia suburbs, died Friday, March 15, of pneumonia at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, Wash. Mr. Wellons lived in Devon and West Chester for 72 years before moving to Seattle in January to be near his daughter, Amy. He was recognized as an expert in roller bearings and was instrumental in developing a version of the buffering mechanisms that were used in aircraft turbine power plants. He also helped develop international engineering standards for roller bearings, his family said.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Rusted pieces of two Apollo-era rocket engines that helped boost astronauts to the moon have been fished out of the murky depths of the Atlantic, Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos and NASA said Wednesday. A privately funded expedition led by Bezos raised the main engine parts during three weeks at sea and was headed back to Cape Canaveral, Fla., the launchpad for the manned lunar missions. "We've seen an underwater wonderland - an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that tells the story of a fiery and violent end," Bezos wrote in an online posting.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph H. Wiseman Jr., 83, of Lower Moreland, a longtime engineer, died Thursday, March 14, of pneumonia at Aria Health-Torresdale Campus. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Wiseman graduated from Olney High School in 1947 and what is now Drexel University in 1951. He lived in Holland, Bucks County, for 30 years before moving to Lower Moreland in 1993. He was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers after completing the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps at Drexel.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roads, dams, water systems, airports, and other underpinnings of the nation's economy are in sorry shape, the American Society of Civil Engineers said Tuesday. But not quite as sorry as four years ago, when ASCE last evaluated the country's infrastructure. The engineers' quadrennial report card graded 16 sectors from aviation to wastewater. Overall, America's infrastructure got a D+, a step above "poor" but shy of "mediocre. " In 2009, the nation's infrastructure got a D. Solid-waste treatment got the highest grade, a B-, and the nation's railroads were most improved, moving up from a C- to a C+. Worst off were the nation's levees and inland waterways: Each got a D- from the engineers' group.
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