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English Channel

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TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | By Liz Wagner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It takes a certain kind of friend to reach out a hand when you are in need. It takes a completely different kind of friend to swim the English Channel for you. But for Tori DeLollo, Trista Felty, and Kiersten Rosenberg, tackling such a feat to help Lauren Schulman was natural. "Lauren was everybody's friend," DeLollo said. Next week, the three women plan to swim 21 miles across the English Channel - from Dover, England, to Calais, France - to raise money and awareness for multiple sclerosis, the disabling neurological disease that was diagnosed in Schulman in August 2007.
NEWS
January 4, 2003 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If salvage workers ever succeed in pulling the hapless Tricolor cargo ship out of the frigid depths of the English Channel, they may want to consider rechristening it the Calamity Jane. Three weeks ago, the Norwegian cargo ship, carrying 2,900 luxury cars to the United States, collided with a Bahamian-registered cargo ship in heavy fog. The Tricolor, on its way from Zeebrugge, Belgium, to Southampton, sank in 90 minutes, taking with it a brand-spanking new array of BMWs, Saabs and Volvos.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
By Robert Garnett One hundred years ago today, the greatest battle of the First World War began - the Battle of the Somme. Hope died that day, and the modern age began. The River Somme wanders through bucolic countryside in northern France, lazily winding toward the English Channel. The river's name is said to derive from an ancient Celtic word meaning "tranquil," and even in today's glossy, high-tech Euro-world, the banks of the Somme remain quiet and rural, "flyover" country.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - Expectations are soaring. Cory Booker arrives here a day after helping lead a 15-hour Senate filibuster demanding votes on gun laws, and amid chatter about his chances to become Hillary Clinton's running mate. The lunch crowd of roughly 300 Democrats sipping iced tea in a Westin ballroom buzz about the Senate blockade and one of their party's rising stars. Far from New Jersey, many here are already familiar with Booker, a testament to his political celebrity, talent for grabbing attention and broad personal appeal.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
'I love women. What can I say?" Clint Cleaver chuckled. "I don't like talking to men. I don't like being with men. I have a few male acquaintances, but I like their wives more than them. " He may have found his ideal niche: a theater rife with women, all telling him what to do. He's one of the actors in Old Academy Players' One-Act Bonanza, which this year features six plays - five written by women, and all with first-time female directors. Two of the productions - Mimi and Ray's 26th of December Absolutely Not Christmas Party and Writing Day - are original and penned by locals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
This year's edition of the Variety Club Telethon, which aired from 10 p.m. Saturday to 6 p.m. Sunday on Channel 6, was the most successful in its 16-year history, according to Channel 6 spokesperson Ruth Gold. The fundraiser received pledges totaling $1,810,235 - about $8,000 more than last year. Boxer Leon Spinks was among the heavyweights who dropped by unexpectedly with a contribution. The presence of Temple University counselor Jim McGowen, a paraplegic whose 1986 attempt to swim the English Channel drew world attention, boosted contributions at the telethon's Fishbowl site, Gold said.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Man will never stop testing his limits - nor finding love in unexpected places, like 56-degree water. Two aquatic updates: After swimming the English Channel in August, chronicled in The Inquirer, Anthony McCarley, 54, of Berwyn finished two monster swims this summer to complete the Triple Crown of marathon swimming. On June 28, he circled Manhattan, 28.5 miles in a conservative nine hours and 40 minutes. Three weeks later, on Saturday morning, he stroked 20.2 miles in the Pacific Ocean from Santa Catalina Island to the California mainland.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
HE'S CHARGED WITH TAKING TO THE AIR TO CLEAR THE AIR Word out of France is that an electronics teacher annoyed by noise from a model-airplane club has been charged with using radio waves to crash more than 100 model planes. Rene Le Mancq, 62, has been feuding with the Marseille club over noise from the planes ever since he moved next door in 1977. In 1980, he won a court decree prohibiting the planes from flying over his property and limiting the number that could be flown at the same time.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony McCarley felt the need to cross the English Channel before he even learned to swim. He doesn't know why or how the dream was born, but suddenly he was 49, living in Berwyn, and decided his chance was slipping away. So in 2009, he began hitting the pool at the Upper Main Line YMCA. He worked himself up to 10,000 meters - six miles, three to four hours per swim. He wouldn't drink or eat because he wanted to prepare himself for the body in revolt. He was somewhat mad, admittedly.
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NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
'I love women. What can I say?" Clint Cleaver chuckled. "I don't like talking to men. I don't like being with men. I have a few male acquaintances, but I like their wives more than them. " He may have found his ideal niche: a theater rife with women, all telling him what to do. He's one of the actors in Old Academy Players' One-Act Bonanza, which this year features six plays - five written by women, and all with first-time female directors. Two of the productions - Mimi and Ray's 26th of December Absolutely Not Christmas Party and Writing Day - are original and penned by locals.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
By Robert Garnett One hundred years ago today, the greatest battle of the First World War began - the Battle of the Somme. Hope died that day, and the modern age began. The River Somme wanders through bucolic countryside in northern France, lazily winding toward the English Channel. The river's name is said to derive from an ancient Celtic word meaning "tranquil," and even in today's glossy, high-tech Euro-world, the banks of the Somme remain quiet and rural, "flyover" country.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - Expectations are soaring. Cory Booker arrives here a day after helping lead a 15-hour Senate filibuster demanding votes on gun laws, and amid chatter about his chances to become Hillary Clinton's running mate. The lunch crowd of roughly 300 Democrats sipping iced tea in a Westin ballroom buzz about the Senate blockade and one of their party's rising stars. Far from New Jersey, many here are already familiar with Booker, a testament to his political celebrity, talent for grabbing attention and broad personal appeal.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHILE MOST mortals think of vacations as a chance to chill out on a beach in the sun, for John Rubbo it was adventure time. John was a scuba diver who liked discovering shipwrecks in the dark corners of the seas where he loved to swim. He panned for gold in Alaska, rappelled down the side of the Municipal Services Building, buzzed around in private planes and visited 20 countries. He once told his family, "There's a big world out there. Go see it. " He died Wednesday at the age of 90. John's adventurous spirit might have been traced back to his service as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain before the United States entered World War II. He was shot down over the English Channel and broke both legs.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  They were packed "like cattle" into a rusty former passenger liner on that Christmas Eve in 1944. More than 2,000 American soldiers left Southampton, England, for Cherbourg, France, where they were to be deployed against the surging German army during what came to be known as the Battle of the Bulge. "We were singing Christmas carols" as the SS Leopoldville crossed the rough English Channel, said Charles Titone, an Army private in Company K, 262th Regiment of the 66th Division.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Man will never stop testing his limits - nor finding love in unexpected places, like 56-degree water. Two aquatic updates: After swimming the English Channel in August, chronicled in The Inquirer, Anthony McCarley, 54, of Berwyn finished two monster swims this summer to complete the Triple Crown of marathon swimming. On June 28, he circled Manhattan, 28.5 miles in a conservative nine hours and 40 minutes. Three weeks later, on Saturday morning, he stroked 20.2 miles in the Pacific Ocean from Santa Catalina Island to the California mainland.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last thing 73-year-old John DeVos wanted was to be thrown out of a graveyard. But he crouched onto his knees a week ago at Greenmount Cemetery, at the very patch of grass where he had watched them bury his 11-year-old brother in 1948. And with a screwdriver and small spade, he began to poke and dig. A flat granite slab with the inscription "MICHEL DEVOS" had gone missing. And if anyone could swear it had been there, in that exact spot, for decades, it was younger brother John.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 70 years, a World War II reunion last month brought two men - strangers who live just miles apart these days - together for a monumental occasion. Army veteran Curtis Deardorff, 92, of Lansdale, and Navy vet James McKelvey, 89, of Aston, both traveled to Washington to receive the French Legion of Honor medal on March 26. They were joined at the French embassy by 11 other vets and the family of another who had passed away. The highest honor bestowed by France, the distinction has been given to hundreds of U.S. veterans who fought for the liberation of a country under German occupation in at least one of the four main World War II French campaigns: Normandy, Provence, Ardennes, and Northern France.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony McCarley felt the need to cross the English Channel before he even learned to swim. He doesn't know why or how the dream was born, but suddenly he was 49, living in Berwyn, and decided his chance was slipping away. So in 2009, he began hitting the pool at the Upper Main Line YMCA. He worked himself up to 10,000 meters - six miles, three to four hours per swim. He wouldn't drink or eat because he wanted to prepare himself for the body in revolt. He was somewhat mad, admittedly.
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