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Enigma

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NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Deborah Lawson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Though many claims have been made for medications and cat foods that reduce the incidence of, or prevent, feline urologic syndrome (FUS), none of these drugs or foods has proved successful in a large clinical trial, according to Kenneth Bovee, professor of medicine and a specialist in kidney diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. "This disease is still a complete enigma," Bovee said of FUS, which includes a number of disorders that result in frequent urination, straining to urinate or a complete blockage of the urinary tract.
NEWS
July 19, 2006
TRADE ALLEN Iverson? Sure - and while you're at it, mock Michelangelo, damn Da Vinci, punish Patton, spurn Spartacus and assassinate Alexander the Great. It's known as genius genocide, and it's as old as history itself. Allen Iverson is an immature child, who would rather be hailed as the "jitter bug" king of the hip-hop nation than as the greatest "small man" to ever play any sport, anytime, anywhere. But despite his own ludicrous priorities, he is a unique, rare, genius-gem: A class "A" enigma!
SPORTS
September 18, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Flyers forward Nikolai Zherdev was an enigma during previous NHL stops with the Columbus Blue Jackets and New York Rangers. Zherdev was drafted fourth overall by the Blue Jackets in 2003. Last season, he played in Russia's Kontinental Hockey League after the Rangers let him go following a $4 million salary award in arbitration. Apparently, the native of Ukraine, who most recently played for the Atlant-Moscow Mystishchi, is still a mystery. At least, he was Thursday at Flyer Skate Zone, one day before the team officially opened training camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989 | By Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
In her autobiography, "Marlene," Marlene Dietrich writes with that Teutonic detachment that can, at times, imbue her screen presence with an almost comic element. First she becomes a star, almost against her will. Why do people go on so about her legs? Then, all that money. What does she need it for? And the jealousy. All the time, everyone is jealous, causing her no end of problems. Jacques Feyder, the French director, was so maddened by the green-eyed monster that just before she was to be filmed naked in a bathtub, he broke down and begged her forgiveness.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Often heard though seldom seen, Wolfgang Rihm is considered Germany's greatest contemporary composer. But he lives such a circumscribed existence he's in danger of becoming an enigma. By no means is he a J.D. Salinger-level enigma, but you won't find him coaching the world's great orchestras in the best way to play his complex works - though often they'd welcome the advice. And don't bother asking him to come to the United States for the high-profile performance of Astralis - written in 2001 and one of his most circulated works - on Friday by the Crossing choir at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill, which will be repeated Sunday at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Getting him to leave his hometown of Karlsruhe takes some persuading; there and in his tiny Berlin apartment, he writes one uncompromising work after another for the likes of violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and conductor Riccardo Chailly.
SPORTS
November 7, 1996 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One game after a dominating win in the PIAA Class AAA District 1 title game, the Strath Haven Panthers returned to being an enigma Tuesday night in beating Boyertown, 1-0, in the first round of the state tournament. The Panthers (22-1-1) were never threatened by the Bears (19-6-3). But then again, this smallish Boyertown team isn't exactly an offensive powerhouse, having scored just 35 goals on the season. Andre Spangler, who set a single-season scoring mark at Strath Haven, has 27 goals on his own this fall.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
In the basement offices of Ruffhouse Records and Studio 4 Recording, the reckless music of the streets meets the cautious logic of the corporate machine. The sounds of this tumultuous intersection are everywhere: While talking about Ruffhouse, the label that's just entered a distribution deal with Columbia Records, Chris Schwartz deflects the phone calls of pushy managers looking for a break. "We get the strangest calls," he says, holding his hand over the mouthpiece. "It's not unusual for acts to leave a whole 20-minute demo tape on the answering machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Enigma, an open-air romantic thriller, is in part set in the stuffy warrens where Brits decipher Nazi codes. It arrives with an impeccable pedigree, mongrel pep, and almost indecipherable plot complications. Jeremy Northam furnishes the breeding, tailoring, and supercilious smirk as the spycatcher Wigram, who has reasons to believe there is a traitor at Bletchley Park, the fabled British estate where coded radio communications were intercepted and translated. Dougray Scott, mangy and rumpled, is Jericho, the egghead who cracks codes and then, when a ravishing blonde scrambles his heart, cracks up. The title refers both to the code and to the cryptic Claire (Saffron Burrows)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In All the Queen's Men, a putative World War II comedy, Friends doofus Matt LeBlanc stars as an ace American Army spy who leads a crackerjack team of English cross-dressers behind enemy lines. Their objective: the Nazi code boxes known as the Enigma. What's really an enigma, however, is how this flatfooted farce ever got the go-ahead in the first place. Call it Some Like It Not So Hot: LeBlanc and his "poof platoon" - Eddie Izzard as a transvestite cabaret crooner, David Birkin as as an effeminate codebreaker, and James Cosmo as an aging macho non-com - don brassieres, girdles and all the rest to infiltrate a Nazi plant where the cipher machines are made.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Ash is back! Thanks to Dynamite Entertainment's "Army of Darkness" series, we are now treated to new adventures starring everyone's favorite handsome, shotgun-toting, chainsaw-wielding department-store clerk - from S-Mart's housewares division - that are worthy of the big screen. Recently awarded Spike TV's Scream Award for Best Screen-to-Comic Adaptation, "Army of Darkness" is another impressive title in Dynamite's stable. The series has so far balanced the action, horror and comedy elements that made the film series popular.
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NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'He was an amazing human being who is finally, rightfully, getting recognition for the great advances he made," Benedict Cumberbatch says about Alan Turing, the British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer pioneer who led the team of code-breakers responsible for cracking Nazi Germany's daunting Enigma machine. Cumberbatch, of course, is playing no small part in seeing to it that Turing gets his due: In The Imitation Game , opening Christmas Day at area theaters, the actor is Turing - a deeply complicated figure whose breakthroughs at Bletchley Park, the top-secret intelligence enclave set up in 1939 in Buckinghamshire, are credited with bringing World War II to a speedier end, thus saving hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Often heard though seldom seen, Wolfgang Rihm is considered Germany's greatest contemporary composer. But he lives such a circumscribed existence he's in danger of becoming an enigma. By no means is he a J.D. Salinger-level enigma, but you won't find him coaching the world's great orchestras in the best way to play his complex works - though often they'd welcome the advice. And don't bother asking him to come to the United States for the high-profile performance of Astralis - written in 2001 and one of his most circulated works - on Friday by the Crossing choir at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill, which will be repeated Sunday at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Getting him to leave his hometown of Karlsruhe takes some persuading; there and in his tiny Berlin apartment, he writes one uncompromising work after another for the likes of violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and conductor Riccardo Chailly.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Like a Whac-A-Mole that emerges when and where we least expect, Donovan McNabb popped up in the headlines again last week after Shawn Andrews called him a bully. For some, this rebuke by a teammate fit neatly into their anti-McNabb narrative. For others, it seemed like piling on, unnecessary roughness against the legacy of the greatest Eagles quarterback. That argument won't get resolved. Philadelphians will never agree on McNabb because we'll never understand him. This city produces inscrutable superstars as regularly as corrupt politicians.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The enemy of my enemy is my friend, goes the old saying. Thus we have Arabs and Jews agreeing to support the military regime that has toppled Egypt's democratically elected government, which was linked to the Muslim Brotherhood. So what should the United States do? Pragmatists say it's probably best to follow Saudi Arabia and Israel in supporting Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, because his purportedly interim military government offers the best hope to restore stability to yet another Mideast nation torn by civil war. But it is unsettling to consider taking any position that would seem to condone the mass killings that have occurred since President Mohamed Morsi was deposed.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | Reviewed by Alexander Heffner, For the Inquirer
Colbert's America Satire and Democracy By Sophia A. McClennen Palgrave McMillan. 240 pp. $25. As the 2012 presidential election approaches, one central question is whether young Americans will turn out in the same numbers as in 2008. Will this "millennial" demographic favor the Democratic ticket by a similarly substantial ratio and help put it over the top in key battleground states against their Republican opponent? In other words, four years later, can young voters decidedly affect the fate of American politics again?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This strange ballet has been playing out in my head recently: The dancers come out on stage and move in complete silence. After a minute or two, audience members begin to shift in their seats. Children lose focus and start asking "When will it be over?" Five or 10 minutes of this, and people are asking for their money back. This would only happen, of course, if, for some bizarre reason, a ballet company decided it no longer needed music. It couldn't really happen, but Pennsylvania Ballet raises the question with its marketing materials for Peter Pan, which opens Thursday.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The premature death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves behind a Shakespearean cast of characters who may not play the roles the late dictator had assigned to them. Kim may have had a stroke in 2008, but his health more recently seemed stable. Observers felt his third son, Kim Jong Un, designated 15 months ago as the heir-apparent, would likely have several years to grow into the role. Instead, the elder Kim's death at age 69, reportedly from a heart attack, now means the rest of the world, in particular a necessarily nervous South Korea, must pay close attention to avoid being caught off guard by an unanticipated shift in the story line.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Classical music warhorses, like cliches, become what they are for a reason: They communicate something important that's understood by many. And because they lose meaning when overused - does anybody really know what awesome means anymore? - they're hardly inexhaustible. That's why the Philadelphia Orchestra's Friday performance of Edward Elgar's Enigma Variations, one of the most popular works in the repertoire and whose "Nimrod" section has achieved "greatest" status, was a model instance of maintaining meaning in often-heard music.
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011
By Mark Adams Dutton. 352 pp. $26.95. Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley One hundred years ago, a young lecturer in history at Yale University named Hiram Bingham made what at the time was celebrated as a historic, indeed heroic, climb through the Peruvian Andes at the climax of which, as Mark Adams puts it in this entirely delightful book, "he stumbled across the geometric splendor of Machu Picchu. " Honored at the time as one of the greatest explorers of the day - it was the day, mind you, of Peary and Scott and Amundsen - he has since lost a good deal of his luster, in part because Machu Picchu had been known for years to many Peruvians before his "discovery" and in part because of Yale's adamant refusal until late last year to return to Peru the hundreds of antiquities he carried away.
SPORTS
October 29, 2010 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
We thought we'd know more about the 2010-11 Eagles by now. Seven weeks of an NFL season provide lots of evidence. But the clues to the Eagles' real identity have pointed in wildly different directions. The Eagles were building for the future and learning with a new quarterback - for about a half. Then it became a win-now season with Michael Vick at the helm. With that stunning shift as a launching point, every week has contradicted what we thought we had learned before. The Eagles have a high-scoring offense that has turned in huge plays only to sputter late against the San Francisco 49ers and Tennessee Titans.
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