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BUSINESS
February 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Google is the colossus of the search engine business, profiting by the billions as users lend their eyeballs and click on ads. But with the company's first in years local workshop for small business entrepreneurs Wednesday at the Kimmel Center, Google sought to portray itself as a wise benefactor on a noble rescue mission: valiantly pulling last-century stragglers onto the digital gravy train. And their cause célèbre - increasing your business' online presence and "hits" - had lots of local endorsers on board, too, including the Afro-American Chamber of Commerce, Greater Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the now Philadelphia-focused Democratic National Convention Committee.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania nonprofit, nonpartisan, entrepreneur-driven advocacy group is expected to launch July 1 with the outgoing president and CEO of the Commonwealth Foundation, Matthew J. Brouillette, at its helm. Commonwealth Partners Chamber of Entrepreneurs will consist of entrepreneurs and philanthropists "working in partnership to advance better public policies in Pennsylvania," according to an announcement issued Thursday. Brouillette's term at the Commonwealth Foundation, a think tank in Harrisburg that advocates fiscally conservative and libertarian public policies, will end June 30. The new agency he will lead, also to be based in Harrisburg, will work to advance public policies in Pennsylvania, educate the public regarding laws and policies, and advocate for legislation to improve economic and educational opportunities for every resident of the state, according to the statement.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Sharon Reading said she was frustrated at her old job - seeing her boss charge $10,000 to a customer for one of her graphic designs and then turn around and pay her a minimal salary. "I sold the idea, I did the design, and he got the money," she said. Reading has turned a recent layoff into a business opportunity. This fall she opened her own firm, Reading Design Express, in Fort Washington. The payoff: She's her own boss, she's able to implement all her own ideas and, best of all, she collects all the fruits of her labor.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Robin Clark, William W. Sutton Jr. and Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writers
In South Philadelphia yesterday, a few enterprising young men were going door-to-door and finding their neighbors willing to pay 50 cents to $1 a bag to have trash hauled to an emergency dump site. In Northeast Philadelphia, protesting residents forced the closing of one dump last night, and during the day police were guiding a steady stream of dumpers onto a vacant plot between the Riverview Home for the Aged and the Delaware River - even though the city had announced that no dumping would be allowed there.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Independence Blue Cross and Thomas Jefferson University on Wednesday announced the first participants in their joint Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program. Two teams at Jefferson were awarded $150,000 each to support projects addressing surgical treatment of complex epilepsy and bone graft and joint replacement infection. Jefferson researchers Noreen Hickok and Irving Shapiro are working with Rothman Institute orthopedic surgeon Jay Parvizi to pursue new ways to make a longer-lasting antibiotic coating for use in bone grafts of donated tissue and replacement joints for orthopedic surgeries.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
This friendship started as so many do between high school girls: Abby Kessler liked Katie Loftus' clothes and makeup; Loftus liked Kessler's. "That's all I cared about," Kessler, now 34, recalled recently. "That, and boys. " The North Penn High School graduates went on to Drexel University together to study design and merchandising, and then on to New York to work in the garment industry. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, inspired them to move back here and start a line of edgy, embellished T-shirts.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  No beckoning searchlights, no red carpet, not even a drop-in by a city dignitary marked Bottle Bar East's grand opening in December. Still, it was a big deal - another first in a string of new ventures, with plenty more planned, for a stretch of Frankford Avenue in Philadelphia's transitioning Fishtown neighborhood. Major credit for the ongoing metamorphosis from Girard Avenue to Master Street goes to restaurant royal Stephen Starr, who since 2011 has opened two culinary outposts - Frankford Hall, a beer garden, and Fette Sau, a barbecue joint - in a place where for decades the primary entertainment draw had been restaurant/music club Johnny Brenda's.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's medical marijuana bill was signed into law in April, but it will be two years before most patients can take advantage of it. That's how long the state has to come up with specific regulations to build this industry. Judging from the range of topics and speakers Friday at a daylong "Medical Marijuana Regulatory-Palooza," it may take at least that long to figure it all out. "We are about to do something that has never been done before," said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Jacob Hurwitz and David Neill are a couple of young Main Line guys who sit around in their free time and, they're not ashamed to admit, talk about trench coats. That usually happens when they're talking about the U.S. economy. Think one doesn't have to do with the other? The Wynnewood residents, friends since childhood, are out to show they do with American Trench. It is a company these otherwise employed men - Hurwitz, 33, at an energy firm; Neill, 40, at the family painting business - have developed to help revive the American manufacturing sector.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
IT'S HARD TO FORGET that Ross Berkowitz's new office in Center City used to be part of the 12th Street Gym. Move-in boxes brimming with office supplies pile where fitness instructors recently demanded more sweat from wheezing aerobicizers. The clunk of a dropped weight occasionally interrupts the quiet, a reminder that the gym still thrives beyond Berkowitz's walls. But in his mind's eye, Berkowitz sees and hears only young professionals clattering away on laptops, the hubbub of entrepreneurs cooking up brilliant business plans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Tayyib Smith didn't grow up in a house where Forbes magazine landed on the doorstep every month or where marketing plans and contract negotiations were topics of discussion at the dinner table. Instead, Smith - chief operating officer and founder of the Little Giant creative agency, founder and publisher of two.one.five magazine, and partner in the Center City coworking space Pipeline Philly - found inspiration for his business acumen in more unconventional figures: Sean "Puffy" Combs, Jay Z, Dr. Dre. "I'm a serial entrepreneur from an undercapitalized community in a city with one-third poverty who has a GED," Smith said.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The regulations that will govern Pennsylvania's nascent medical-marijuana industry are quickly taking shape. The state released a draft of the rules Thursday that all aspiring cannabis growers and processors will have to follow to win - and keep - one of 25 potentially lucrative permits. Gov. Wolf signed the medical-marijuana bill into law in April. Patients with one of 17 medical conditions expect to be able to buy state-approved cannabis by 2018. The draft regulations - more than 90 pages of them - define how Pennsylvania marijuana should be cultivated, protected, and tracked.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Just two years ago, Shreyas Parab was such a shy, unassuming teenager that it pained him to make eye contact. Now the 15-year-old from Aston, Delaware County, wears ties declaring himself a chick magnet and a stud muffin. And he's running a company that has sold nearly 600 of those novelty ties for close to $17,000 in its first 14 months of business, tapping into a market where whimsy is popular. Parab also makes pitches to investor panels, and has met with Sam's Club executives in Bentonville, Ark., hoping to get his Novel Tie line in their stores.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan Forty-eight percent of millennials believe the American dream is dead, according to a 2015 Harvard University Institute of Policy study. Their pessimism is understandable, especially if we believe the American dream is that one can achieve success through hard work. In 1995, 62 percent of Americans with high school diplomas had jobs. Today, only 54 percent do. That's 5.7 million jobless high school graduates who, 20 years ago, would have had jobs.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's medical marijuana bill was signed into law in April, but it will be two years before most patients can take advantage of it. That's how long the state has to come up with specific regulations to build this industry. Judging from the range of topics and speakers Friday at a daylong "Medical Marijuana Regulatory-Palooza," it may take at least that long to figure it all out. "We are about to do something that has never been done before," said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Frederick P. "Fred" Catona, a former high school wrestler and a bright entrepreneur who started a company that shipped hoagies overnight to locations across the country - and who once even tried to send hoagies into outer space - died on May 31. He was 70. His death was related to injuries sustained in an automobile accident, his family said. Mr. Catona, of Blue Bell, grew up in Delaware County and attended Ridley High School, where he created a scholarship fund for wrestlers, his family said.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Caroline Sarver Stevens of Lafayette Hill, a registered nurse and entrepreneur, died April 28 of complications after a lengthy illness. No age was given, at the deceased's request. "She was beautiful, warm, compassionate, loving, driven and very success-oriented," said her eldest daughter, Sandy Izzo. Born in Liverpool, Pa., and raised on a 100-acre farm, Stevens went to Liverpool High School, where she was valedictorian, Germantown Hospital School of Nursing, and Temple University.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
This particular Thursday night in April, cold beer and thin-crust pizza were plentiful. Desks had been rolled out of the way, replaced by rows of chairs filled with mostly twenty- and thirtysomethings drinking, eating, and generally having a good time. By coworking-space standards, it seemed like a run-of-the-mill happy hour at Benjamin's Desk on 17th Street in Center City. Routine, that is, until the first name was called, a woman rose from her chair and stepped to the microphone, and the storytelling began.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania nonprofit, nonpartisan, entrepreneur-driven advocacy group is expected to launch July 1 with the outgoing president and CEO of the Commonwealth Foundation, Matthew J. Brouillette, at its helm. Commonwealth Partners Chamber of Entrepreneurs will consist of entrepreneurs and philanthropists "working in partnership to advance better public policies in Pennsylvania," according to an announcement issued Thursday. Brouillette's term at the Commonwealth Foundation, a think tank in Harrisburg that advocates fiscally conservative and libertarian public policies, will end June 30. The new agency he will lead, also to be based in Harrisburg, will work to advance public policies in Pennsylvania, educate the public regarding laws and policies, and advocate for legislation to improve economic and educational opportunities for every resident of the state, according to the statement.
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