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Entry Level Jobs

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BUSINESS
December 1, 1988 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The state Legislature's move to raise the Pennsylvania minimum wage to $3.70 an hour only confirms the reality for most jobs in the Philadelphia area. Most workers in unskilled, entry-level jobs are already making more than that, usually between $4.50 and $5.50 an hour, according to local economists. Economists and others said a low 4 percent regional unemployment rate combined with a seven-year lull since the last minimum wage increase make the new $3.70 figure passed Tuesday largely immaterial.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
LOTS OF Philadelphians need jobs, and City Council is looking for ways to help. Council's Committee on Finance held a hearing Wednesday on two bills sponsored by Councilman Bill Green, including one that would require businesses with nonprofessional services contracts with the city to hire Philadelphians. "This applies what has been applied only to the construction industry to all nonprofessional services," Green said. For any businesses that receive more than $150,000 in service contracts or that receive other forms of financial aid from the city, the bill creates a hiring goal of 50 percent Philadelphians.
SPORTS
May 16, 2012 | By Dan Geringer, geringd@phillynews.com
Nearly every time Doc Halladay pitched at Citizens Bank Park last year and the year before that, he was wildly cheered from the centerfield Bud Lite Rooftop by Doc's Patients — guys in matching hospital gowns frantically miming defibrillator resuscitation on each other to celebrate every strikeout. Phillies fans hadn't seen such loyal devotion to a pitcher since the legendary Wolf Pack — the eight Wood brothers plus four first cousins — showed up in wolf masks, dancing and howling at the Vet a decade ago to celebrate Randy Wolf's outings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Friday night's episode of Undercover Boss will have a distinctly local flavor — the salty, loamy taste of soft pretzels. That's because the subject of the show is Bensalem native Dan DiZio, the CEO of the Philly Pretzel Factory. The drama on the CBS reality show promises to play out differently as well. Usually, the corporate chieftains haven't lifted anything heavier than a phone their entire careers. So they tend to experience trouble once they take on disguises to perform their companies' most physically demanding, entry-level jobs.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Zeks Air Drier Corp. in Malvern plans to construct a 75,000-square-foot building in Goshen Corporate Park in East Goshen so that the growing company can move into expanded quarters in 1999. The business makes compressed-air treatment equipment and is owned by Penguin Industries of Exton. Company officials also envision expanding the current workforce of 150 people to as many as 250, depending on sales after the move to East Goshen. JOB OPTIONS HOPE - the nonprofit organization Helping Other People Evolve - will hold a job fair at the West Chester Community Center from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 20 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 21. The job fair is designed to give people with limited skills a chance to pursue entry-level jobs with Chester County employers.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2000 | By Wendy Tanaka, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The area's need for skilled workers could be alleviated if low-income Philadelphians received the training and other help they needed to work for growth companies in the suburbs, a report issued yesterday said. The report, "Workforce 2000," was issued by the Regional Workforce Partnership, a new consortium of 45 area businesses, community groups and colleges, and it is a platform to track future job-placement success. "There's a geographic mismatch of jobs and people," said David Thornburgh, executive director of the Pennsylvania Economy League, which prepared the report.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Jennifer S. Braxton is worried about finding a job next spring when she graduates from Syracuse University. "It's frightening," said Braxton, 20, a West Philadelphia senior who is studying communications and anthropology. She hopes to get a job with a magazine or publishing company. "The chances are very slim, and you have to be lucky and very talented to get a job," she said. Braxton will be among the millions of college seniors nationwide who will take to the streets in May with degrees in hand looking for a job. They will join the millions who have been laid off in recent years through corporate downsizings and belt-tightenings.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Blaine Moyer wandered through the North Penn High School gymnasium yesterday clutching key chains, pens, and sundry other knickknacks bearing the names, logos and slogans of local businesses participating in a career expo for students. "I got a luggage tag from Triple-A, and I got pens and pencils," the 17-year-old said, removing a handful of the freebies from his left-hand pocket. "And I'm not done yet. " The idea behind the expo, organized by directors of the North Penn School District's Career Development Partnership Program, was to introduce students to the area's business community by giving them a forum at which to hobnob with human-resources types from 39 companies.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Debra Schlosser was sitting in a Dairy Queen in Colmar when she was formally introduced to one of the ugly sides of human nature. He was a "cheesy guy," Schlosser said, pausing momentarily to ensure that she had chosen the right word to describe this peculiar brand of sleaze. "Are you working with the retards?" he asked. Schlosser was on her first assignment as an employment specialist with Pathway Employment & Training Services, a Conshohocken-based employment agency for handicapped people.
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NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
SPORTS
April 29, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
WE ARE NEARING the end of "The Silly Season. " I, for one, am going to miss it. Those aren't my words, by the way - "The Silly Season. " They are Chip Kelly's, uttered during the NFL owners' meetings, and I couldn't agree with him more. The final play of the Super Bowl to NFL draft day once was a time of peace. That is long gone, especially in places where baseball is not played or played badly, where the professional basketball team offers only entry-level jobs, where the Stanley Cup has become a historical footnote.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer @phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
CITY COUNCIL yesterday joined a growing list of cities across the country that have passed legislation requiring employers to provide their workers with paid sick leave. The Philadelphia bill passed 14-2 and, a few hours later, was signed by Mayor Nutter, who had vetoed two earlier versions. "It feels good," said Councilman William Greenlee, who sponsored the bill. "I think the real winners here are the workers of Philadelphia. " Councilman Bobby Henon commended Greenlee before the final vote for his "dogged persistence," which led to a rousing round of applause from many in attendance.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
ON AN ICY Christmas night in 1776, George Washington led his troops across the Delaware River to secure America's independence and to fight unfair taxation. Yesterday, Philadelphia 76ers CEO Scott O'Neil flexed the franchise's freedom to find tax breaks, announcing that the team and its employees will cross the river to the Camden waterfront to open a new headquarters and a state-of-the-art, 120,000-square-foot practice center by June 2016, thanks to $82 million in tax credits approved by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority Board.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia fast-food workers and activists joined protests Thursday in what was billed as a global fast-food strike, with workers in 150 cities and 30 countries reportedly participating. It was Philadelphia's first official participation in a fast-food strike, although there have been strikes in Wilmington and rallies in the city on the issue of raising wages for fast-food workers to $15 an hour. Industry associations say raising wages would force restaurant owners to cut positions or hours.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As strikes go, this one was more symbol than shutdown. The Burger King on U.S. 202 in Wilmington, in my neighborhood, was one of the fast-food outlets hit by a national mini-walkout and picketing backed by the Service Employees International Union . SEIU held a pre-Labor Day "action," pushing for higher wages for the army of workers who pack and sell fast-food sandwiches, drinks, fries, and snacks in factory-like conditions. The strikers want to double the minimum wage, currently $7.25 an hour, as my colleague Jane Von Bergen reported.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Ever ask yourself why Philadelphia's taxes seem only to go up? The answer is evident when you get out of your comfortably middle-class (or better) neighborhood, if you live in one. And if you don't live in such a neighborhood, you see the answer every day - poverty. The city's tax base is small enough that the burden on those who can afford it keeps growing and growing just to pay for basic services. That will poison the city's future unless poverty among its residents is dramatically reduced.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
LOTS OF Philadelphians need jobs, and City Council is looking for ways to help. Council's Committee on Finance held a hearing Wednesday on two bills sponsored by Councilman Bill Green, including one that would require businesses with nonprofessional services contracts with the city to hire Philadelphians. "This applies what has been applied only to the construction industry to all nonprofessional services," Green said. For any businesses that receive more than $150,000 in service contracts or that receive other forms of financial aid from the city, the bill creates a hiring goal of 50 percent Philadelphians.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Will Bunch and Daily News Staff Writer
MARQUISE Kittrell, who lives in Southwest Philadelphia and just turned 20, has taken a couple of community-college courses since graduating from high school, but earlier this year he decided to dabble his toes in the full-time job market. It hasn't gone well so far. Summarily rejected for entry-level jobs at the likes of Target and Pathmark, Kittrell recently applied to work as a zombie. Seriously. When Kittrell read an article about a plan to open a 200-acre zombie-inspired theme park called Z World in the industrial wastelands of Detroit, he instantly applied to play one of the undead.
SPORTS
May 16, 2012 | By Dan Geringer, geringd@phillynews.com
Nearly every time Doc Halladay pitched at Citizens Bank Park last year and the year before that, he was wildly cheered from the centerfield Bud Lite Rooftop by Doc's Patients — guys in matching hospital gowns frantically miming defibrillator resuscitation on each other to celebrate every strikeout. Phillies fans hadn't seen such loyal devotion to a pitcher since the legendary Wolf Pack — the eight Wood brothers plus four first cousins — showed up in wolf masks, dancing and howling at the Vet a decade ago to celebrate Randy Wolf's outings.
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