CollectionsEntry Level Jobs
IN THE NEWS

Entry Level Jobs

BUSINESS
March 17, 1995 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The general national despair over entry-level jobs that don't pay a living wage ignores this fact: Most people don't stay in those jobs for their entire working lives. They move on to better-paying positions. A new study of 240,000 Pennsylvania residents who started out as retail clerks or busboys found that after seven to 15 years of work, many were earning as much as workers who started out in other fields. That good fortune stemmed from job-switching. Within five years of starting out, only 10 percent still had jobs in trade or service industries, the study found.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Tired of that dead-end career? Always wondered if there was a future for you "in computers" - or maybe one for that daughter or grandkid mired in an unrewarding job? Convinced you can't get a shot without at least a bachelor's degree? If that sounds a bit like one of those old matchbook ads or wee-hours commercials, it's no coincidence. Decades into the computer revolution, IT careers still beckon to people struggling or dissatisfied in other fields. And there are lots of routes toward one - not just four-year degrees, but community college and for-profit schools, including some financed by student loans that recipients may regret many years hence.
NEWS
May 19, 1986
My street in the Fairmount section was repaved the other day. I am very pleased. The process raises several questions, however. The street did not need repaving. Yes, there were a few minor potholes, but not enough to justify a complete repaving. "No parking" notices were never posted. The city had to go to the expense of towing every car off the block before work could begin. Finally, and most important, our street, as well as all the streets within a three-block radius, has never been cleaned by sanitation workers in the six years that I have lived here.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
IMAGINE A 2 1/2-hour commute to work cut to 45 minutes. Imagine a job paying $7 an hour job turning into one paying $13 an hour. Workers who use the Commuter Options vans operated by the Philadelphia Unemployment Project don't have to imagine - they have already experienced these great changes. The 20-van program, run by the Philadelphia Unemployment Project and funded by a $1.5 million federal grant obtained by U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, lets Philadelphians reach the good-paying, entry-level jobs in the suburbs.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Middle Bucks Institute of Technology will be one of only two schools in Pennsylvania to receive $150,000 in funding from Bell Atlantic for new telecommunications classes, state and company officials announced Tuesday. The new equipment and classes will be available at Middle Bucks and the Central Westmoreland Area Vocational-Technical School in Westmoreland County this fall, according to Bell Atlantic and school officials. "These students will be able to hit the ground running with any number of companies," Lt. Gov. Mark Schweiker said at an announcement in Harrisburg Tuesday.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The Glassboro Public School District has applied for a $67,335 grant under the federal Job Training Partnership Act to continue paying for an employment program for students and residents in the 1987-88 school year. Michael P. Toscano, assistant superintendent, said that for the last seven years, Glassboro has participated in the program to place economically disadvantaged students and residents in entry-level jobs within the school district and in local private businesses. Secretarial, custodial, maintenance and graphic arts positions are included.
NEWS
July 23, 2011
CHI Institute, a Broomall vocational school with a majority of its students receiving federal financial aid, has agreed to pay $1.6 million to reimburse the U.S. government and resolve allegations that CHI failed to deliver the education it promised to candidates in its now-suspended surgical technology program, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania announced Friday. The surgical technology program, which ceased new enrollment in 2008, was supposed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in a surgical setting.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The days of the automotive grease monkey - the low-paid service station mechanic who repaired cars - are gone. Today, trained technicians work with automotive computer systems and can earn more than $75 an hour, in some instances, for specialized work. "We have a shortage of employees in the auto industry," said Tom Wizda, spokesman for the state automotive inspection stations in Delaware County. "The industry is not what it was 25 years ago. " That's the message that Wizda and other industry representatives are driving home to students in area schools.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jobs go begging in this seaside city, and so yesterday the oldest casino on the Boardwalk begged for employees in a grand style usually reserved for high- rolling gamblers. With the shimmering Atlantic Ocean as a backdrop, top executives from Resorts International Casino Hotel pitched invited guests on the idea of recruiting workers for 4,000 jobs at Resorts' nearly completed casino, the Taj Mahal. They gave away T-shirts, raffle tickets and an elegant buffet lunch of pasta, watermelon salad, bleu-cheese appetizers and pastel pastries.
NEWS
January 17, 1997
The word from two University of Michigan astronomers that the universe has, oh, about 10 to the 100th power years to live is kind of a tough break for a lot of politicians. Clearly, they'd been hoping the world's dying whimper would come before they were forced to deal with some thorny issues that scare the incumbency-loving daylights out of them. But they'll be getting no cosmological reprieve, according to scientists Fred Adams and Greg Laughlin, who've plotted the course of the universe to the end of the current starry era, through a "degenerate era" (and you thought we were already there)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|