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Envelopes

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BUSINESS
August 10, 1993 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
American Business Products Inc., of Atlanta, yesterday announced that it had signed a letter of intent to buy International Envelope Co., an Exton maker of specialty envelopes. Under the plan, International Envelope would retain its name, its 238 employees and continue business as usual, officials of the companies said. Terms of the proposed cash transaction were not disclosed; the deal must be approved by directors of both companies. International Envelope, a privately held company with 1992 revenues of about $42 million, bills itself as the largest maker of tear-proof envelopes used by courier services such as Federal Express and by other businesses.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There's nothing like a good battle over stationery. Envelopes were the target of township critic Robert H. Landau's accusations toward longtime nemesis Ruth Damsker, tax collector, who he said used the stationery for personal use. But to township officials, it was much ado about nothing. Before Tuesday night's commissioners meeting, Commissioner Robert Hannum told Landau: "You better not take any more than five minutes. " Said Landau, "I have information that will show that she has been using township materials for her Rotary Club business.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Jeff Greenfield
Tonight millions of Americans will stay up past their bedtimes to find out who will win Hollywood's Academy Awards. While it's a diverting enough enterprise, the Oscar celebration does focus further attention on a business already threatening to engulf us in newsprint and television coverage. By contrast, the same people who eagerly follow the comings, goings, couplings and uncouplings of Tinseltown cannot name their member of Congress or governor. Many Americans do not know with which side the American government is allied in Nicaragua, and cannot name the hemisphere in which that country is located.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David L. Milling, 69, of Upper Providence, the former owner and chairman of International Envelope Co. who won an award from Queen Elizabeth II, died of a heart attack Wednesday at Taylor Hospital in Ridley Park. Mr. Milling was born in Charleston, W.Va., and raised in Haddonfield. After graduating from Clemson University with a degree in mechanical engineering, he served in the Army as an engineering construction unit commander stationed at Fort Bragg. From 1954 until 1973, Mr. Milling was employed by the DuPont Co. in a variety of positions, including sales.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1997 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sandra Levenson could usually predict the dollar amounts that would appear on her phone bill. Likewise for the electricity and heating bills. But a credit-card bill in the mailbox generally evoked feelings ranging from fear to panic. Like many charge-card users, the Souderton chiropractor typically underestimated how much she was spending when it came to purchasing with plastic. "In 1988, I was newly divorced with four children," recalled Levenson. "All of a sudden, I was responsible for all the family finances.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The United States and Switzerland will participate in a joint commemorative issue Friday on the 700th anniversary of the Swiss confederation. The designs are nearly identical. Both stamps depict the U.S. Capitol building in the right foreground and the Swiss Federal Building, or parliament, in the background on values of 50 cents and 1.60 francs. The U.S. stamp carries a two-line legend, "Switzerland/Founded 1291," in the lower left corner, while the Swiss stamp has the dates "1291-1991" in the same position.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
Veteran collectors may do a double take when the U.S. Postal Service issues a 25-cent commemorative Tuesday on New Hampshire's statehood bicentennial. The vertical design features a silhouette of the Old Man of the Mountains, a craggy granite formation at Franconia Notch that offers a striking likeness of a man's head. A nearly identical vertical design appeared on a 3-cent commemorative issued in 1955 on the 150th anniversary of the Old Man's discovery. The New Hampshire commemorative is the ninth in a series of statehood bicentennials being issued in the order that the states ratified the Constitution.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service and the Soviet Union will participate in joint commemoratives Wednesday honoring William Saroyan, Armenian-American author and playwright. First-day ceremonies will be in Fresno, Calif., Saroyan's birthplace, and Yerevan, Armenia, one of the Soviet republics. The 29-cent U.S. and 1-ruble Soviet designs are based on a photograph of Saroyan. Saroyan (1908-1981), son of an Armenian immigrant, was renowned for his sentimentality and irreverent stories from his childhood.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
Another bicentennial series comes to an end Tuesday with a 25-cent commemorative honoring Rhode Island, the last of the 13 original states to ratify the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Postal Service said the stamp would be issued at the Slater Mill Historic Site in Pawtucket, which is depicted in the vertical design. Slater Mill was the first factory in the country to produce cotton yarn with the aid of water-driven machinery. The design includes the date -May 29, 1790 - that Rhode Island ratified the Constitution.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service will issue a 29-cent Black Heritage Series commemorative Friday in Chicago for Percy Lavon Julian, an Alabama-born chemist who helped discover drugs for the relief of glaucoma and arthritis. Julian (1899-1975) was the son of schoolteachers, though his father later worked as a railway mail clerk. He graduated from the State Normal School for Negroes in his home town of Montgomery, Ala., and enrolled at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., living in the attic of a fraternity house that hired him as a waiter.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Man vs. Pole. If the scene Saturday at the South Ninth Street Italian Market Festival were a reality show, that would be the fitting title. The 30-foot grease pole, back from a 19-year hiatus, cut an imposing - and rather slippery - figure. Slathered in 16 pounds of lard, it won the crowd over early. But that didn't deter "Team Cannuli" of Cannuli's House of Pork. Leader Charlie Cannuli, 28, got pals Ricky Jacobs, 27, Mike Mastero, 27, and Luke Lindsey, 27, still wearing their aprons from selling pork sandwiches, to be the first team to take on the formidable column.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
As one, graduating medical students across the country opened their envelopes Friday and discovered the results of the National Resident Matching Program, learning where they will next go to train. In Camden, one Cooper Medical School of Rowan University student learned he would be staying, matched with the emergency medicine program at Cooper University Hospital. Then another student ran up: "Cooper?" she shouted. "Cooper!" he said, hugging her. Another student ran up. "Cooper?"
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
VATICAN CITY - The World Meeting of Families Catholic conference in Philadelphia will push the envelope a bit, as Catholic conferences go, and include sessions on the "hook-up culture," homosexuality, and the incarcerated, organizers said Thursday. The conference Sept. 22-25, the impetus for Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia, has also already broken registration records. "In Philadelphia, the homeland of American Independence, the bell will ring for families," said Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, president of the Pontifical Council for Families, which oversees the meeting.
NEWS
April 9, 2015
I WAS PACKING up my laptop last night when my colleague Julie Shaw, a court reporter with more stories than she could handle, reached across the cubicle and gave me four envelopes. They were written to Julie by none other than Padge Victoria Windslowe, a/k/a the notorious Black Madam. Before I'd even heard her name, I'd been following with morbid fascination America's current fixation on big, Kim Kardashian-esque booties. But it was late in the day. I told an editor that I would look at the letters the very first thing this morning, and I headed out of the newsroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When he's not cycling through his repertoire of Mozart and Brahms concertos, pianist Peter Serkin often pushes concertgoers into seriously unknown regions, invariably to everyone's benefit. His collaboration with the Orion Quartet on Friday at the Kimmel Center seemed not to frighten off Philadelphia Chamber Music Society patrons, even though much of the program was taken up with Max Reger's little-known Piano Quartet Op. 133 and Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony transcribed for keyboard and strings.
NEWS
February 24, 2015
HOLLYWOOD'S HAD its Oscars. Time for Pennsylvania's Pennies. Not the coins, the annual awards named for the founder. And the winners are: *  BEST PICTURE: "The Kane Mutiny" The scintillating saga of a woman under sail to political glory before her course is drastically altered by a sting case, Jerry Sandusky, Dick Sprague, porn, possible criminal charges, talk of impeachment and leaks threatening to sink her ship. This Pennie winner easily beat out "Boyhood," the tender tale told over time of a young Rob McCord growing up poor without any meat, which drives him to a life of crime in search of his political chops.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane has said it was about transparency: The public needed to know about a criminal investigation that ended without charges against a prominent Philadelphia civil rights leader. Her critics say it was about something else: payback. Many details of the leak that now threatens to derail Kane's career remain mysterious - even as a statewide grand jury has concluded that her office "improperly and unlawfully" released confidential materials related to a 2009 case.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An alcoholic manic depressive poet. An alcoholic depressive lesbian poet. Perfect together. For three decades, Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop, two of the 20th century's most influential poets, were heartfelt pen pals. They spoke of their lives, their art, their takes on the world and each other. Much of that time, she was living in Brazil, and he was shuffling among England, New England, and wherever else the life of a lionized academic and poet could take him. They first met in 1947, and only a handful of times thereafter.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
It doesn't matter whether it was folded into a napkin or slipped into an envelope. It doesn't matter whether it was handed over at a fancy restaurant or outside a chauffeured BMW. It doesn't even matter whether the legislature has gotten around to making it illegal. It is plainly wrong for a public official to take cash. Most people understand this principle intuitively. But it seems to have eluded the five Philadelphia officials allegedly caught in a derailed sting. The Inquirer has reported that four Philadelphia legislators and a former traffic judge were recorded taking thousands of dollars in cash, money orders, and jewelry from a wire-wearing lobbyist turned informant, Tyron B. Ali. Details of Ali's recordings revealed this week offer a glimpse of a dystopia in which lightweight legislators worked to line their pockets instead of representing their districts.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some mail-in votes for New Jersey's Nov. 5 gubernatorial election may be voided if they were sent in the same envelope used to mail ballots for Wednesday's special Senate election, officials said Thursday. Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, in a conference call with reporters Thursday morning, said campaign workers for State Sen. Barbara Buono, a fellow Democrat running for governor, had learned that "up to a few thousand" such mail-in votes could be voided. The Attorney General's Office issued a statement Thursday saying there was a concern in Mercer County regarding a "few" such ballots.
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