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NEWS
March 28, 2006
LETTER-WRITER Kim Empson points to a few votes, taken out of context, as evidence that the future of our environment is not something important to me. I'd like to take this opportunity to correct Ms. Empson's misstatement. Our children and grandchildren deserve to enjoy the benefits of a clean, protected environment, just as my generation has. America's vast environmental resources have always been among our nation's greatest assets, which is why I've long fought to preserve them.
NEWS
March 1, 2004 | By Walter Cronkite
President Bush's recent State of the Union address has awakened environmental activists such as they haven't been for some time. They are concerned not by what he said but by the lack of public reaction to what he did not say. He spoke of the nation's problems and the dangers it faces, particularly in regard to national security, but he gave no indication that he recognizes the dangers of global warming. Surely it has been brought to his attention that scientists are increasingly alarmed over the rapidity with which the world's environment is being poisoned by the refuse of human endeavor.
NEWS
January 24, 2006
RE PATRICK O'Brien's letter "Is there a place for a family guy in Philly's sports palaces?" Pat, even if you could afford to go to one of these games, I don't think you would want to bring your family. A friend of mine brought her son to the Sixers game on Jan. 9, and paid $50 for each ticket. Once there she was afraid to ask to be moved from the group of "animals" who were sitting next to her and her son because she has to walk a mile to her car afterward. These men were cursing, throwing things and causing everyone around them to be uncomfortable.
NEWS
October 27, 1997
The Clinton administration is taking yet another waffling approach to our environment. Global warming is not an issue we can afford to waffle on. Al Gore has actually written a book on the disastrous effects of global warming. We have a president and Congress who agreed to a treaty in Rio claiming we would cut our emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2000 (a promise we simply ignored). And our president, addressing a panel of top economists and scientists, spoke ever so eloquently about the dangers of global warming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Bringing art and a message of environmental awareness to the people is Margot de Wit's aim in her multimedia installation, "Dichotomy Project No. 18," at the Painted Bride Art Center. De Wit is a Dutch-born Philadelphia sculptor and artist-in-residence at Glassboro State College. The installation includes a video portion created by a team including poet Ernest Yates and composer Edo Jasper. Her video images zero in on the urban environment; deteriorated housing here and elsewhere receives considerable attention - most notably the once- grand Parkside Avenue mansions on which her camera effectively dwells.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
Frankly, we've had our belly full of President Bush's equivocating about whether he'll go to the largest gathering of world leaders ever - the United Nations' Earth Summit on environment and development in Brazil this June. One day he says he sure would like to go. The next, he frets about signing accords that might hamstring the U.S. economy. Still later, he remarks, "We do have room for compromising. " He's starting to sound like Mario Cuomo. What's really going on here is that the White House staff is split about the politics of whether to go to Rio. Some say Mr. Bush can't afford not to: All the other guys are going and, besides, it coincides with the California primary, when environmental stuff is likely to be hot. Others say it's a loser.
NEWS
October 30, 2002
When he sails New Jersey's intracoastal waters, Rep. Jim Saxton remembers a time when Barnegat Bay was lined with treetops, not rooftops. That's why he has fought to expand the state's wildlife refuges and preserve its estuaries. He also remembers the late 1980s when red tides plagued New Jersey's coastline; dolphins were dying, and garbage and medical waste washed ashore. Now, the Republican congressman can boast that New Jersey's beaches are among the nation's cleanest - a model for states - because of clean-water laws he sponsored.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | BY WALTER FOX
In the flood of news accounts, magazine articles, political oratory and governmental reports generated by the drug crisis, one can drown without ever confronting this fundamental question: Why in the last two decades of the 20th century do so many Americans of all races and economic levels turn to drugs as a means of coping with reality? Any program that hopes to be effective in reducing drug use among Americans must have, if not an answer to this question, at least a working hypothesis.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Penelope M. Carrington, Special to The Inquirer
With the threat of global warming and acid rain, and with preservation of the Amazon rain forest on the minds environmentally conscious adults, Joseph Pilyar is looking to the future for help by asking children of the Delaware Valley to join in the fight and "Hug the Earth. " "The idea emanated from me, the store and my interest with children," said Pilyar, who is owner of a bookstore and the founder of the year-old, nonprofit environmental organization for children called Hug the Earth.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The World Health Organization estimates that, each year, one in four deaths globally result from living or working in an unhealthy environment. That's 12.6 million people. Of those, most are due to noncommunicable diseases, such as heart conditions and cancer, related to pollution exposure. The remaining third are from infectious diseases, such as malaria and diarrhea, due to unsafe water and lack of sanitation represent. "If countries do not take actions to make environments where people live and work healthy, millions will continue to become ill and die too young," WHO Director General Margaret Chan said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By David Spigelmyer While the daily headlines and nonstop, 24-hour news cycles focus overwhelmingly on issues that often divide the nation, it can be easy to lose sight of where common ground exists and what shared commitments bring us together. And there's more that unites us - business and labor as well as Republicans, Democrats, and independents - than divides us. While division might drive TV ratings and social-media clicks, it's no secret that all Americans support a stronger economy with low unemployment; a thriving manufacturing sector that creates middle-class jobs for families; and a healthier, cleaner environment for our kids and grandkids.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The World Health Organization estimates that, each year, one in four deaths globally result from living or working in an unhealthy environment. That's 12.6 million people. Of those, most are due to noncommunicable diseases, such as heart conditions and cancer, related to pollution exposure. The remaining third are from infectious diseases, such as malaria and diarrhea, due to unsafe water and lack of sanitation represent. "If countries do not take actions to make environments where people live and work healthy, millions will continue to become ill and die too young," WHO Director General Margaret Chan said.
SPORTS
March 1, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The continuing overhaul of the Phillies' analytics department received a lot of attention late last season and into the offseason as the faces in the front office changed. Numbers will be crunched now that never were before, and it was all necessary to bring this team into the 21st century. Still, there are things of great value in baseball that can never be calculated by algorithms or big brains. One of them is the value of winning and developing relationships of trust at the minor-league level.
SPORTS
February 26, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
ONCE UPON a time in the NFL, when patience hadn't yet become a dirty word and coaches usually could count on being given at least three years before needing to update their resumes, the preferred method for developing a quarterback was slow-roasting rather than two minutes in a microwave. Back then, when you drafted a quarterback, unless he was one of those rare pass-throwing, ready-for-prime-time prodigies, you usually gave him a baseball cap and clipboard and had him watch and learn for a year or two before you put him in the line of regular-season fire.
NEWS
December 22, 2015
E DMUND KLIMEK, 52, of Plainsboro, Middlesex County, N.J., is managing partner of KSS Architects in Center City. The full-service architecture, planning and interior-design firm - which also has offices in Princeton - was founded in 1983. It has since broadened its scope, with notable projects in the startup community, higher education, corporate headquarters and charter schools. The firm focuses on collaborative and innovative work spaces and projects with social impact. Q: Tell me about your recent projects.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS - Pope Francis on Friday hailed the role of the United Nations in promoting human rights, peacekeeping, and advancing the rule of law, and urged its member nations to do more to protect the environment and the world's neediest. Before a stage of world leaders, Francis amplified the themes he has struck during his historic North American journey. Speaking in his native Spanish, his message was more fluid - and at times more pointed - than the unprecedented address he gave in halting English to Congress on Thursday.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLEST CHANGES inside one small household - a faster shower, a lighter meal, a different light bulb - could ripple out into the human family across the earth. That was the message Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, told a large audience at the World Meeting of Families yesterday afternoon at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Turkson, a Ghanaian, is considered to be the public face of Pope Francis' war on global warming, and he reiterated a message the leader of the Catholic Church hopes to drive home with followers.
SPORTS
July 26, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
WENTWORTH, Nova Scotia - The first thing I did when I arrived at my final road trip destination for vacation in Nova Scotia: Ate a seafood pie. The second thing I did: Ran a trail race, or, more accurately, participated in a trail run. The format of the Sonofa Gunofa Run is as follows: The course is a 4.5K "semi-technical and hilly loop" with about 225 meters of vertical gain/loss per lap, according to organizer Jodi Isenor. It's on a mountain in the Wentworth Valley, so the race's surface included rocks, paths covered in beds of leaves that made you spring up as you ran on it, meadows, descents covered in tree roots, a log to jump over, and, until the fourth round, a wasp's nest.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The Pine Barrens surrounding Stockton University were choked with brush and a mix of trees - from white oaks and red maples to Virginia, pitch, and shortleaf pines. The conditions made for a sickly forest, vulnerable to wildfires and insect infestation, including the destructive southern pine beetle. But last week - following earlier prescribed burns to clear undergrowth - the woods along Vera King Farris Road began feeling more airy. The first of hundreds of trees came down, and sunlight again bathed the ground, making it possible for a healthier forest to take root next to the Atlantic County school.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As New Jersey lawmakers consider how to implement a constitutional amendment approved by voters in November to dedicate funds for the preservation of open space, environmentalists are lobbying to carve out money for their pet causes. But here's the catch: Lawmakers must pass a bill that would be palatable to Gov. Christie, a Republican preparing to run for president in 2016, who could veto a measure he doesn't like or similarly strike language from the budget in June. "We have to find a way to at least make the open-space portion of the budget some way supportable by the governor," Sen. Bob Smith (D., Middlesex)
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