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Environmental Crisis

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NEWS
September 29, 2000
The "environmental crisis" has happened because the human household or economy is in conflict at almost every point with the household of nature. . . . What has happened is that most people in [the developed world] have given proxies to the corporations to produce and provide all their food, clothing and shelter. Moreover, they are rapidly giving proxies to corporations or governments to provide entertainment, education, child care, care of the sick and elderly and many other kinds of "service" that once were carried on informally and inexpensively by individuals or households or communities.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and representatives of many of the city's public and private environmental groups will be on hand tomorrow night for an "environmental town meeting" in South Philadelphia to examine the environmental problems facing Philadelphia's neighborhoods. The event, which its organizers called the city's first wide-ranging town meeting to identify how citizens can help alleviate the city's "environmental crisis," will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the South Philadelphia Community Center, Broad and Shunk Streets.
NEWS
October 4, 1992
Vice President Quayle and Sen. Al Gore are to the environment what Paul Bunyan and Johnny Appleseed were to trees. As chairman of the White House Council on Competitiveness, Quayle has led the Bush administration's battle to relax pollution controls, allowing industry to swing its ax and speed up development of natural resources. Gore, armed with his bestseller, Earth in the Balance, argues that the world is on the edge of an environmental crisis and needs to restrain its use of resources so that enough will remain for future generations.
NEWS
September 25, 1987
Gov. Casey angered some legislators last week when he used the occasion of a ceremonial session commemorating the bicentennial to declare that "Pennsylvania faces an environmental crisis as threatening as the crisis faced by the Constitution's framers. " Perhaps the occasion was not the most appropriate. But the governor's sense of urgency in challenging lawmakers to act quickly on his environmental program certainly was not misplaced. Last spring, the last remaining dump for hazardous waste in Pennsylvania was closed, although industries still churn the stuff out. Many communities, including Philadelphia, are rapidly running out of places to put their garbage.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | JOHN B. OAKES, From the New York Times
With the environmental security of America and the world at risk, President Bush is playing a cynical political game. To support his claim that he is an environmentalist, he has apparently decided to attend the U.N. Conference on Environment and Development - the so-called Earth summit - in Rio de Janeiro next month. But Bush is no environmentalist. If he were, he would long ago have discarded his fears of the right wings of both parties. He would have had the vision to grasp the leadership of this international effort to control forces that present a greater threat to civilization than the Cold War ever did. Instead, by longstanding indifference, if not hostility, to the Rio meeting and a negative approach to many of its complex issues, the administration has nearly sabotaged it. By holding off on accepting the Rio invitation for months, Bush discouraged other heads of state from coming, but not some close friends and keen competitors, including Japan, Britain, Germany and Canada.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By JAMES R. SPOTILA
Sen. Al Gore's Earth in the Balance is the most important book of the decade, not because it contains the answer, but because it focuses on the question. How do we face a global environmental crisis that threatens civilization as we know it? If we continue our neglect of ecological issues, the end will not come with a bang, as in a nuclear war, but will arrive imperceptibly. Our grandchildren might not enjoy the clean air and water, the protective sky and changing seasons that we expect as our birthright.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
There was no shortage of charisma or crowd noise at a rally for Michael Dukakis on the campus of Rutgers University yesterday. Unfortunately for Dukakis, the charisma was supplied by Robert Redford and the crowd noise came from Students for Bush. But the new, aggressive post-debate Dukakis was undaunted. He hammered away at Vice President George Bush's environmental record and got a big laugh from his audience when he referred to his hecklers as "noise pollution. " Dukakis spoke to about 1,000 students after receiving the endorsement of four environmental groups and actor Redford, who has been active in environmental causes.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
GORE'S ENVIRONMENTAL PROPOSALS CALLED CREATIVE I strongly object to John Lott's Commentary article Aug. 28 that unfairly and inaccurately characterized Sen. Al Gore as an extremist. In his book, Earth in the Balance, Senator Gore argues persuasively that the global population explosion, the destruction of the ozone layer and the present mass extinction of species, among other problems, are inexorably leading to an environmental crisis that threatens to destroy civilization as we know it. If Senator Gore's assessment of the global environmental crisis is correct, then the senator's proposed global Marshall Plan to protect and heal the environment is not only wise, but essential.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, the seminal generation of environmental stalwarts gathered for the first Earth Day with a sense of panic. "We are in an environmental crisis that threatens this nation," warned Barry Commoner, then a Washington University biologist and one of the foremost environmental advocates, in 1970. Since then, key air pollutants have been cut nearly 60 percent in the United States, more than 100 million acres have been dedicated to wilderness, the number of clean lakes and rivers has doubled, and the bald eagle is no longer threatened with extinction.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Susan Chrysler White's art has always pulsed with explosive energy. In her paintings of a few years ago, that visual force seemed more physical than emotional, although in retrospect it could be read as a metaphor for emotional turmoil. In her new work at Janet Fleisher Gallery, White's metaphors are more specific. The new pieces aren't as noticeably agitated as the earlier paintings, but through them she takes aim at two causes that concern her deeply, violence against women and the despoliation of the environment.
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NEWS
August 22, 2003 | By Walter Cronkite
The great blackout of 2003 has exposed, with too stark a drama, that the country faces not one but two power problems: One is the matter of electric power; the other is the matter of political power. It will be easier to deal with the former than the latter. Among the experts in the electric power world, there seems to be agreement that to assure an uninterrupted source of power, we need more power plants and more transmission lines. Among the experts in the political power world, there is no agreement at all on how to get there - and as they argue the possibilities, another blackout festers.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
The "environmental crisis" has happened because the human household or economy is in conflict at almost every point with the household of nature. . . . What has happened is that most people in [the developed world] have given proxies to the corporations to produce and provide all their food, clothing and shelter. Moreover, they are rapidly giving proxies to corporations or governments to provide entertainment, education, child care, care of the sick and elderly and many other kinds of "service" that once were carried on informally and inexpensively by individuals or households or communities.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, the seminal generation of environmental stalwarts gathered for the first Earth Day with a sense of panic. "We are in an environmental crisis that threatens this nation," warned Barry Commoner, then a Washington University biologist and one of the foremost environmental advocates, in 1970. Since then, key air pollutants have been cut nearly 60 percent in the United States, more than 100 million acres have been dedicated to wilderness, the number of clean lakes and rivers has doubled, and the bald eagle is no longer threatened with extinction.
NEWS
October 4, 1992
Vice President Quayle and Sen. Al Gore are to the environment what Paul Bunyan and Johnny Appleseed were to trees. As chairman of the White House Council on Competitiveness, Quayle has led the Bush administration's battle to relax pollution controls, allowing industry to swing its ax and speed up development of natural resources. Gore, armed with his bestseller, Earth in the Balance, argues that the world is on the edge of an environmental crisis and needs to restrain its use of resources so that enough will remain for future generations.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By JAMES R. SPOTILA
Sen. Al Gore's Earth in the Balance is the most important book of the decade, not because it contains the answer, but because it focuses on the question. How do we face a global environmental crisis that threatens civilization as we know it? If we continue our neglect of ecological issues, the end will not come with a bang, as in a nuclear war, but will arrive imperceptibly. Our grandchildren might not enjoy the clean air and water, the protective sky and changing seasons that we expect as our birthright.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
GORE'S ENVIRONMENTAL PROPOSALS CALLED CREATIVE I strongly object to John Lott's Commentary article Aug. 28 that unfairly and inaccurately characterized Sen. Al Gore as an extremist. In his book, Earth in the Balance, Senator Gore argues persuasively that the global population explosion, the destruction of the ozone layer and the present mass extinction of species, among other problems, are inexorably leading to an environmental crisis that threatens to destroy civilization as we know it. If Senator Gore's assessment of the global environmental crisis is correct, then the senator's proposed global Marshall Plan to protect and heal the environment is not only wise, but essential.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | JOHN B. OAKES, From the New York Times
With the environmental security of America and the world at risk, President Bush is playing a cynical political game. To support his claim that he is an environmentalist, he has apparently decided to attend the U.N. Conference on Environment and Development - the so-called Earth summit - in Rio de Janeiro next month. But Bush is no environmentalist. If he were, he would long ago have discarded his fears of the right wings of both parties. He would have had the vision to grasp the leadership of this international effort to control forces that present a greater threat to civilization than the Cold War ever did. Instead, by longstanding indifference, if not hostility, to the Rio meeting and a negative approach to many of its complex issues, the administration has nearly sabotaged it. By holding off on accepting the Rio invitation for months, Bush discouraged other heads of state from coming, but not some close friends and keen competitors, including Japan, Britain, Germany and Canada.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Susan Chrysler White's art has always pulsed with explosive energy. In her paintings of a few years ago, that visual force seemed more physical than emotional, although in retrospect it could be read as a metaphor for emotional turmoil. In her new work at Janet Fleisher Gallery, White's metaphors are more specific. The new pieces aren't as noticeably agitated as the earlier paintings, but through them she takes aim at two causes that concern her deeply, violence against women and the despoliation of the environment.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and representatives of many of the city's public and private environmental groups will be on hand tomorrow night for an "environmental town meeting" in South Philadelphia to examine the environmental problems facing Philadelphia's neighborhoods. The event, which its organizers called the city's first wide-ranging town meeting to identify how citizens can help alleviate the city's "environmental crisis," will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the South Philadelphia Community Center, Broad and Shunk Streets.
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