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Environmental Health

NEWS
October 20, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
An explosion ripped through an oil refinery yesterday, injuring 30 workers, three critically. The afternoon blast originated in a line carrying liquid petroleum gas, but its cause was not immediately known, said Bill Buckalew, environmental health and safety manager at the Mobil Oil plant. A fire that went to three alarms was quickly extinguished, Fire Capt. Randy Brooks said. Portions of the refinery south of Los Angeles were shut down, but most of the plant was operating normally within a few hours, Mobil said in a statement.
FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few years, Philly's mobile-food industry has finally begun to catch up with the city's impressive restaurant scene, as dozens of chefs and entrepreneurs debut creative concepts well beyond gyros and soft pretzels. Now, those food trucks selling pork-cheek tacos and grass-fed burgers are spurring a secondary market: new and improved commissaries designed just for them. The facilities are equipped not just with basic prep tables and sanitizing sinks, but also with full commercial kitchens, secure parking, and lots of extras.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The national uproar over lead poisoning in Flint, Mich., has drawn renewed attention to a children's health crisis that has plagued Pennsylvania and New Jersey for decades. The states' own data show that 18 cities in Pennsylvania and 11 in New Jersey may have an even higher share of children with dangerously elevated levels of lead than does Flint. The states' reports, released in 2014, were recirculated this week by health advocates trying to draw attention to the lead problem. "We're not to trying to take anything away from Flint," said Elyse Pivnick, director of environmental health for Isles Inc., a community development organization based in Trenton.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of 16 emergency responders seeking compensation and medical monitoring for health concerns stemming from a 2012 train derailment and toxic spill in Paulsboro. The lawsuit names Conrail, CSX, and Norfolk Southern, which operate a bridge that malfunctioned and caused the accident. It also names the Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, a consulting firm hired to assess medical problems. A lawyer representing the workers said the firm, hired by the railroad companies, either failed to take urine samples for medical monitoring or lost them.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
The trouble with a chocolate high is it wears off quickly - and that can leave you feeling cranky. One month after members of Congress held a retreat in Hershey, America's chocolate capital, to relearn (or, in some cases, be introduced to) the arts of civil dialogue, two high-ranking lawmakers got in a jawing and shoving match on the House floor Wednesday. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee, wagged an angry finger in the face of Republican Whip Tom DeLay of Texas, who responded with a shove and the kind observation that Mr. Obey was a "gutless chickens--t.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 200 gallons of aluminum chloride solution spilled from a cracked pipe at Nalco Chemical Co. yesterday morning, and some of the mixture leaked into a ditch that feeds into Little Mantua Creek, company officials said. Nalco and county health officials said yesterday afternoon that the spill was controlled before anything entered the creek. "We expect no residual problems," said Jim Woods, senior environmental health specialist for the Gloucester County Department of Health.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
State, county and local officials have established a game plan for investigating the contamination in wells near a Phoenixville Borough landfill. A cancer-causing chemical, which is known as tetrachloroethylene, perchloroethylene or PCE, was found in November in the wells of two Schuylkill Township residents who live next to a 14-acre dump site on Second Avenue in Phoenixville. So far, no one has been able to identify the source of the contamination, and tests conducted on the landfill have not shown signs of PCE. But the contamination at the homes is at levels that merit testing of other wells, said David Jackson, director of environmental health for the Chester County Health Department, after a meeting last Thursday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania milk is safe, the state contends, despite two surveys that found milk in several cities, including Philadelphia, polluted with potentially harmful veterinary drugs. "We have been testing since May 1988, and harmful substances are not a problem in Pennsylvania milk," said Gene Schenck, a state Agriculture Department spokesman. The federal Food and Drug Administration began testing retail milk in Philadelphia and a dozen other cities this week after a Wall Street Journal survey found widespread traces of animal drugs that have been linked to cancer.
NEWS
February 21, 1987
The sad spoiling of a once-thriving Pennsylvania stream by a discharge of manure reveals once more the destructive impact of reliance on meat and other products gained at the expense of animals. It is dependence on meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products that accounts for the intensive agricultural practices that are destroying America's topsoil. This same dietary predilection is in part responsible for the destruction of rain forests and other wild lands, here and abroad, as millions of acres are razed in order to graze cattle or to grow crops fed to animals.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers
The University of Pennsylvania's 17-13 loss to Cornell Saturday might have been sickening to hometown fans, but doctors doubt that's why about 100 Penn students reported to the infirmary after the game. Food poisoning is the suspected culprit, and various samples have been taken for laboratory analysis. "We don't know in fact it was food that was gotten at the football game," said Robert Davis, of the city's environmental health services unit. A spokesman for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania said the students had eaten hot dogs, pretzels, colas and other food at the game - which snapped an 11-game winning streak.
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