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Environmental Health

NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Air pollution from traffic and power plants seems to cause genetic changes - the kind linked to cancer - in developing fetuses, a federally funded study released yesterday has concluded. A first-of-its-kind study of 60 pregnant women in poor areas of New York City used backpacks to monitor the women's exposure to airborne carcinogens and then tested their babies' umbilical-cord blood after birth. Babies whose mothers were exposed to higher pollution levels had 53 percent more aberrations in their chromosomes.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Associated Press contributed to this article
Considering what happened Thursday, Tom Smith could not be happier that the in-home water filtration product his company sells hasn't been very popular. On Thursday, a California environmental watchdog group said that the Uniflow water filtration system distributed by Franke Inc., a Swiss company with its U.S. office in Hatfield, actually increased the lead content of drinking water instead of removing impurities as it was designed to do. "These results show that consumers are often exposed to toxic levels of lead from these products," said Richard Mass, research director of the Environmental Quality Institute of the University of North Carolina-Asheville, which conducted the study for California's Center for Environmental Health.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
An explosion ripped through an oil refinery yesterday, injuring 30 workers, three critically. The afternoon blast originated in a line carrying liquid petroleum gas, but its cause was not immediately known, said Bill Buckalew, environmental health and safety manager at the Mobil Oil plant. A fire that went to three alarms was quickly extinguished, Fire Capt. Randy Brooks said. Portions of the refinery south of Los Angeles were shut down, but most of the plant was operating normally within a few hours, Mobil said in a statement.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
For years, whenever the Philadelphia health department discovered a restaurant with hygiene problems that posed a public threat, it has ordered the business to shut down and clean up. And for years, restaurants have been able to ignore those cease-and-desist orders. That's set to change in March. An agreement signed by the health agency and the Department of Licenses & Inspections will give health inspectors the power to shut down problem eateries, said Palak Raval-Nelson, director of Environmental Health Services.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
Forget yellow snow. Beware yellow Popsicles if you see the ice-cream man cruising through Bucks County and Trenton. Responding to a motorist's tip, police stopped ice-cream truck driver Yassir Hassan as he weaved dangerously on Route 1 near the Oxford Valley exit in Middletown Township on Friday and charged him with drunken driving because, they said, he appeared visibly intoxicated and had wine stashed in his truck. The wine was their least-disturbing discovery, though. Authorities said that they found urine stored in several water bottles placed throughout the truck, including one in the freezer alongside the ice-cream treats.
FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few years, Philly's mobile-food industry has finally begun to catch up with the city's impressive restaurant scene, as dozens of chefs and entrepreneurs debut creative concepts well beyond gyros and soft pretzels. Now, those food trucks selling pork-cheek tacos and grass-fed burgers are spurring a secondary market: new and improved commissaries designed just for them. The facilities are equipped not just with basic prep tables and sanitizing sinks, but also with full commercial kitchens, secure parking, and lots of extras.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of 16 emergency responders seeking compensation and medical monitoring for health concerns stemming from a 2012 train derailment and toxic spill in Paulsboro. The lawsuit names Conrail, CSX, and Norfolk Southern, which operate a bridge that malfunctioned and caused the accident. It also names the Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, a consulting firm hired to assess medical problems. A lawyer representing the workers said the firm, hired by the railroad companies, either failed to take urine samples for medical monitoring or lost them.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
The trouble with a chocolate high is it wears off quickly - and that can leave you feeling cranky. One month after members of Congress held a retreat in Hershey, America's chocolate capital, to relearn (or, in some cases, be introduced to) the arts of civil dialogue, two high-ranking lawmakers got in a jawing and shoving match on the House floor Wednesday. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee, wagged an angry finger in the face of Republican Whip Tom DeLay of Texas, who responded with a shove and the kind observation that Mr. Obey was a "gutless chickens--t.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 200 gallons of aluminum chloride solution spilled from a cracked pipe at Nalco Chemical Co. yesterday morning, and some of the mixture leaked into a ditch that feeds into Little Mantua Creek, company officials said. Nalco and county health officials said yesterday afternoon that the spill was controlled before anything entered the creek. "We expect no residual problems," said Jim Woods, senior environmental health specialist for the Gloucester County Department of Health.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
State, county and local officials have established a game plan for investigating the contamination in wells near a Phoenixville Borough landfill. A cancer-causing chemical, which is known as tetrachloroethylene, perchloroethylene or PCE, was found in November in the wells of two Schuylkill Township residents who live next to a 14-acre dump site on Second Avenue in Phoenixville. So far, no one has been able to identify the source of the contamination, and tests conducted on the landfill have not shown signs of PCE. But the contamination at the homes is at levels that merit testing of other wells, said David Jackson, director of environmental health for the Chester County Health Department, after a meeting last Thursday.
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