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Environmental Health

FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few years, Philly's mobile-food industry has finally begun to catch up with the city's impressive restaurant scene, as dozens of chefs and entrepreneurs debut creative concepts well beyond gyros and soft pretzels. Now, those food trucks selling pork-cheek tacos and grass-fed burgers are spurring a secondary market: new and improved commissaries designed just for them. The facilities are equipped not just with basic prep tables and sanitizing sinks, but also with full commercial kitchens, secure parking, and lots of extras.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Gideon Bradshaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Activists said Tuesday that the Attorney General's Office has told them it will look into how state officials handled complaints by residents on the possible health impacts of natural gas drilling. Sam Bernhardt, an organizer for the advocacy group Food & Water Watch, said an agent from the office's Environmental Crimes Unit asked him for contact information for individuals who contend the Department of Health never responded to their inquiries about symptoms they believed were related to natural gas drilling.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Given the history of climate change science - predictions that, no matter how draconian, are often so vague that the dangers are easily ignored or misinterpreted - the specificity of new research out Thursday from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is intriguing: measurable rises in the number of kidney-stone cases at hospitals and doctors' offices that can be linked to increases, even small ones, in the average daily temperature. Their research suggests that both adults and children could be at a higher risk for the painful condition as the world warms.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
The trouble with a chocolate high is it wears off quickly - and that can leave you feeling cranky. One month after members of Congress held a retreat in Hershey, America's chocolate capital, to relearn (or, in some cases, be introduced to) the arts of civil dialogue, two high-ranking lawmakers got in a jawing and shoving match on the House floor Wednesday. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee, wagged an angry finger in the face of Republican Whip Tom DeLay of Texas, who responded with a shove and the kind observation that Mr. Obey was a "gutless chickens--t.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 200 gallons of aluminum chloride solution spilled from a cracked pipe at Nalco Chemical Co. yesterday morning, and some of the mixture leaked into a ditch that feeds into Little Mantua Creek, company officials said. Nalco and county health officials said yesterday afternoon that the spill was controlled before anything entered the creek. "We expect no residual problems," said Jim Woods, senior environmental health specialist for the Gloucester County Department of Health.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
State, county and local officials have established a game plan for investigating the contamination in wells near a Phoenixville Borough landfill. A cancer-causing chemical, which is known as tetrachloroethylene, perchloroethylene or PCE, was found in November in the wells of two Schuylkill Township residents who live next to a 14-acre dump site on Second Avenue in Phoenixville. So far, no one has been able to identify the source of the contamination, and tests conducted on the landfill have not shown signs of PCE. But the contamination at the homes is at levels that merit testing of other wells, said David Jackson, director of environmental health for the Chester County Health Department, after a meeting last Thursday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania milk is safe, the state contends, despite two surveys that found milk in several cities, including Philadelphia, polluted with potentially harmful veterinary drugs. "We have been testing since May 1988, and harmful substances are not a problem in Pennsylvania milk," said Gene Schenck, a state Agriculture Department spokesman. The federal Food and Drug Administration began testing retail milk in Philadelphia and a dozen other cities this week after a Wall Street Journal survey found widespread traces of animal drugs that have been linked to cancer.
NEWS
February 21, 1987
The sad spoiling of a once-thriving Pennsylvania stream by a discharge of manure reveals once more the destructive impact of reliance on meat and other products gained at the expense of animals. It is dependence on meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products that accounts for the intensive agricultural practices that are destroying America's topsoil. This same dietary predilection is in part responsible for the destruction of rain forests and other wild lands, here and abroad, as millions of acres are razed in order to graze cattle or to grow crops fed to animals.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers
The University of Pennsylvania's 17-13 loss to Cornell Saturday might have been sickening to hometown fans, but doctors doubt that's why about 100 Penn students reported to the infirmary after the game. Food poisoning is the suspected culprit, and various samples have been taken for laboratory analysis. "We don't know in fact it was food that was gotten at the football game," said Robert Davis, of the city's environmental health services unit. A spokesman for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania said the students had eaten hot dogs, pretzels, colas and other food at the game - which snapped an 11-game winning streak.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and representatives of many of the city's public and private environmental groups will be on hand tomorrow night for an "environmental town meeting" in South Philadelphia to examine the environmental problems facing Philadelphia's neighborhoods. The event, which its organizers called the city's first wide-ranging town meeting to identify how citizens can help alleviate the city's "environmental crisis," will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the South Philadelphia Community Center, Broad and Shunk Streets.
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