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Environmental Health

ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blue-tinged dog guarded the perimeter of a Bryn Athyn backyard on a warm afternoon in September. Beyond, vats of logwood chips and fermented indigo flowers steeped on the lawn, and swaths of fabric in shades of navy, lavender, and cornflower dried in the sun, draped over drying racks, bushes, and lawn chairs. At the center of this blue streak were Mira Adornetto and Elissa Meyers of BlueRedYellow, Philadelphia's natural-dye house. They were running a "blue" workshop, the first in a tricolor fall series.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
The trouble with a chocolate high is it wears off quickly - and that can leave you feeling cranky. One month after members of Congress held a retreat in Hershey, America's chocolate capital, to relearn (or, in some cases, be introduced to) the arts of civil dialogue, two high-ranking lawmakers got in a jawing and shoving match on the House floor Wednesday. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee, wagged an angry finger in the face of Republican Whip Tom DeLay of Texas, who responded with a shove and the kind observation that Mr. Obey was a "gutless chickens--t.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 200 gallons of aluminum chloride solution spilled from a cracked pipe at Nalco Chemical Co. yesterday morning, and some of the mixture leaked into a ditch that feeds into Little Mantua Creek, company officials said. Nalco and county health officials said yesterday afternoon that the spill was controlled before anything entered the creek. "We expect no residual problems," said Jim Woods, senior environmental health specialist for the Gloucester County Department of Health.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
State, county and local officials have established a game plan for investigating the contamination in wells near a Phoenixville Borough landfill. A cancer-causing chemical, which is known as tetrachloroethylene, perchloroethylene or PCE, was found in November in the wells of two Schuylkill Township residents who live next to a 14-acre dump site on Second Avenue in Phoenixville. So far, no one has been able to identify the source of the contamination, and tests conducted on the landfill have not shown signs of PCE. But the contamination at the homes is at levels that merit testing of other wells, said David Jackson, director of environmental health for the Chester County Health Department, after a meeting last Thursday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania milk is safe, the state contends, despite two surveys that found milk in several cities, including Philadelphia, polluted with potentially harmful veterinary drugs. "We have been testing since May 1988, and harmful substances are not a problem in Pennsylvania milk," said Gene Schenck, a state Agriculture Department spokesman. The federal Food and Drug Administration began testing retail milk in Philadelphia and a dozen other cities this week after a Wall Street Journal survey found widespread traces of animal drugs that have been linked to cancer.
NEWS
February 21, 1987
The sad spoiling of a once-thriving Pennsylvania stream by a discharge of manure reveals once more the destructive impact of reliance on meat and other products gained at the expense of animals. It is dependence on meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products that accounts for the intensive agricultural practices that are destroying America's topsoil. This same dietary predilection is in part responsible for the destruction of rain forests and other wild lands, here and abroad, as millions of acres are razed in order to graze cattle or to grow crops fed to animals.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers
The University of Pennsylvania's 17-13 loss to Cornell Saturday might have been sickening to hometown fans, but doctors doubt that's why about 100 Penn students reported to the infirmary after the game. Food poisoning is the suspected culprit, and various samples have been taken for laboratory analysis. "We don't know in fact it was food that was gotten at the football game," said Robert Davis, of the city's environmental health services unit. A spokesman for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania said the students had eaten hot dogs, pretzels, colas and other food at the game - which snapped an 11-game winning streak.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and representatives of many of the city's public and private environmental groups will be on hand tomorrow night for an "environmental town meeting" in South Philadelphia to examine the environmental problems facing Philadelphia's neighborhoods. The event, which its organizers called the city's first wide-ranging town meeting to identify how citizens can help alleviate the city's "environmental crisis," will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the South Philadelphia Community Center, Broad and Shunk Streets.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Montgomery County Health Department is investigating the outbreak of a flu-like illness among participants at an equestrian trade show held at the Valley Forge Convention Center from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2, health officials said yesterday. The health department has received 20 calls from exhibitors who said they were experiencing high fevers, chills, severe coughing, chest pains and coughing up of fluids. About 8,000 people attended the Equestrian Marketing Trade Association show, convention center officials said.
LIVING
February 2, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES This article contains information from the Chicago Tribune and the Baltimore Sun
Empty plastic soda bottles turn into fast, inexpensive bird feeders with a flick of the wrist - and a do-it-yourself kit from Gadjit Outdoors. The kit includes a screw-on plastic base, a funnel for easy filling part easy and either a hanger for suspending the feeder or suction cups for window-mounting. All you need to supply is the empty bottle and the seed. "The idea has been around for awhile," explains Jamie McNaughton, vice president of McNaughton Inc. of Minneapolis, which makes the product.
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