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Environmental Issues

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NEWS
November 1, 2002 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Springfield, Delaware County, community activist who was sued earlier this year by a local development company for remarks he made at a township meeting is seeking payment for his legal expenses, invoking a Pennsylvania law that protects people who speak out on environmental issues. Justin K. Miller, an attorney for Keith Mock, said that he believed this was the first time the law, which was passed in late 2000, has been used as a defense in a lawsuit. Robert Richards, director of the Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment, agreed and said that the case "will be closely watched" by environmental and antidevelopment advocates, especially to see whether the courts rule that the law still applies, even though the suit was dropped before going to trial.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbit, who four years ago touted Dick Zimmer's environmental record, traveled to New Jersey yesterday to take it all back. Appearing at a news conference organized by the New Jersey Environmental Federation, Babbit said Zimmer voted in Congress to weaken restrictions on wetlands development and to reduce federal oversight of ocean dumping. Zimmer, a Republican, is running against fellow Congressman Bob Torricelli, a Democrat, for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Democrat Bill Bradley, and Zimmer and Torricelli have each sought to depict himself as having a strong record on the environment.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, STAFF WRITER
What Airbnb has done for vacationers looking for a room to rent, Alfrea hopes to do for those looking to grow their own food. The New Jersey-based start-up launched Alfrea.com Friday to connect those wanting to garden with people who have some extra planting space to offer. And if growers wind up with more tomatoes and zucchini than they can make sauce and bread with, Alfrea.com will help them sell that surplus. The site also provides matchmaking with gardening experts, such as people who will water and weed for $20 an hour, and others offering canning services for $15 an hour.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Noel Brown, director of the United Nations Environmental Programme for North America, will speak Saturday in West Deptford at a special forum on environmental issues. The South Jersey Environmental Information Center will meet at the West Deptford Public Library to discuss balancing economic growth with protection for the environment. Brown will deliver the keynote speech. Brown attended the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in June and will summarize its results. Titled "Roadmap to a Healthy Future," the forum will inform people about how experts from industry, government and environmental groups are addressing the issue, said Millicent Gaskell, an environmental specialist at the center.
NEWS
April 10, 2006
RE THE letters supporting Sen. Rick Santorum's environmental voting record: The harsh reality is that time and time again, Sen. Santorum has voted against the most important environmental proposals while serving in the Senate. It shows in his ratings with some of the leading environmental groups. Since 1999, Sen. Santorum has averaged a score of under 4 percent with the League of Conservation Voters, including two congressional sessions with the dismal score of 0. Sen. Santorum also received a 0 from PennEnvironment every year since 2000 except the year he received 5 percent.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The trick to presenting Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People is to keep it from becoming the enemy of the audience. A precise if relentless study in human alienation, this five-act, so-sad-it's-almost-funny play about an idealist who preaches his truth at all costs opened Thursday at the Bristol Riverside Theater. The play is packed with many issues extremely relevant to our own time - and it pushes the cast to its limits. Written in 1882, An Enemy of People immediately predicts the downfall of its crusading main character - one Dr. Thomas Stockmann (Kevin Bergen)
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the nation celebrates Earth Day today, organizers of Earth Week activities in Philadelphia say that the commitment of government agencies to solving environmental issues appears to have weakened - possibly as a result of the budget deficit and the ailing national economy. But business, they say, is stepping in. "During the past two years, I sense that there is definitely less interest on the part of government in solving these problems," said Joanne Denworth, president of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, a nonprofit group that is co-sponsoring this year's events.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
The elements of the discussion were diverse: Big Macs, acid rain, birth control, Exxon and Polish Solidarity. The participants were equally diverse: a theologian, an engineer, a geographer, a corporate lawyer, a college professor and a federal environmental official. The six were members of a panel that met Saturday at Haverford College to ponder a massive puzzle, "The Environment and Our Future. " The need for changes in attitude and behavior was the recurrent theme of the informal three-hour session attended by more than 100 people.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Because there's a toxic dump - Ewan - in Shamong big enough to make the federal Superfund list and a dam on the disappearing Indian Mills Lake that state authorities said needed emergency repair, the proposed creation of an environmental commission for the township sounded like a good idea. At least it did early in the fall when the Township Committee adopted an ordinance establishing the commission, to be composed of committee-appointed volunteers interested in environmental issues.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson and James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush will commemorate Earth Day with a visit to the Maine coast today, while Sen. John Kerry intends to bash the President's environmental record during a trip to Bush's home state. Environmental issues have lost some of their political potency in recent years, but Kerry has good reason to hit them hard. Tough talk on the environment can help energize the Democratic base, encourage campaign contributions from environmental activists, and give the Massachusetts senator another chance to cast the President as beholden to corporate interests.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, STAFF WRITER
What Airbnb has done for vacationers looking for a room to rent, Alfrea hopes to do for those looking to grow their own food. The New Jersey-based start-up launched Alfrea.com Friday to connect those wanting to garden with people who have some extra planting space to offer. And if growers wind up with more tomatoes and zucchini than they can make sauce and bread with, Alfrea.com will help them sell that surplus. The site also provides matchmaking with gardening experts, such as people who will water and weed for $20 an hour, and others offering canning services for $15 an hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Philadelphia had a 5 percent recycling rate, and the only environmental issue ever to come up in municipal elections was parking. So success seemed improbable when Christine Knapp began calling for the next mayor to adopt a sustainability agenda and create a citywide office to enact it. But - whether timing, luck, or skill - it worked. In 2008, Mayor Michael Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Sustainability. In 2014, voters made it a permanent department: the Office of Sustainability.
NEWS
July 28, 2015
ISSUE | RACE RELATIONS Firsthand account I am one of those who shares syndicated columnist Dana Milbank's buoyancy "to have the president speaking as loudly as the haters" on the issue of race ("The president speaks out," July 22). A dear African American friend of 38 years, just passed away, lived with us as a family member for three years and shared what it was like to live in our predominately white neighborhood. In a tribute to this rare and remarkable human being, my son recalled, "He would regale me with stories of having fun in the city, but also stories about being picked up (and eventually released without charges)
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The trick to presenting Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People is to keep it from becoming the enemy of the audience. A precise if relentless study in human alienation, this five-act, so-sad-it's-almost-funny play about an idealist who preaches his truth at all costs opened Thursday at the Bristol Riverside Theater. The play is packed with many issues extremely relevant to our own time - and it pushes the cast to its limits. Written in 1882, An Enemy of People immediately predicts the downfall of its crusading main character - one Dr. Thomas Stockmann (Kevin Bergen)
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie is again taking steps to keep New Jersey out of a regional program enforcing regulations on carbon emissions by power plants. A proposal scheduled for publication Monday in the state register would repeal rules associated with the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap-and-trade program New Jersey joined other states in implementing in late 2005. Christie announced in 2011 that he would withdraw the state from the program, which the Republican governor said had been ineffective.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what was, by all accounts, their first public appearance together since winning their parties' nominations in the May 20 primary election, Republican Gov. Corbett and Democratic challenger Tom Wolf outlined their competing environmental stances Wednesday night at the annual dinner meeting of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council. Both spoke of a need for balance - that environmental protection and economic development are not mutually exclusive. But they differed in how to get there - most notably, but not surprisingly, on whether there should be an extraction tax on natural gas development in the state's rich Marcellus Shale formation.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second of four candidate profiles SCRANTON - Katie McGinty moved through the room with the ease of a politician who had decades under her belt. Framed by the sunny halls of John F. Kennedy Elementary School, she shook hands, posed for photos, and greeted children who reached up for hugs. Many of the teachers at the campaign stop 10 days ago had only the vaguest idea who McGinty was. But as they listened to her recite her education priorities, that hardly seemed to matter. If elected governor, McGinty said, she would push to rescind Gov. Corbett's cuts, promote smaller class sizes, and fund preschool.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By David Porter, Associated Press
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - The widow of U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg threw her support Monday behind Democratic Rep. Frank Pallone to fill her husband's vacant seat, touting Pallone as a "go-to guy" in the House on environmental issues and a legislator with a lengthy track record of accomplishment. Bonnie Lautenberg also took a few mild swipes at Pallone's chief Democratic competitor in next month's primary, Newark Mayor Cory Booker, as a candidate whose numerous TV appearances and celebrity connections would not necessarily translate to effective governing.
NEWS
February 23, 2013
By Michael K. Pearson and Gary Skulnik To remain dynamic, Philadelphia needs new blood and new businesses. But just as a good neighbor can make a huge difference in residents' quality of life, so too can the right businesses. We must seek companies with modern mindsets and practices. That means attracting businesses that share the city's vision of progress. These companies are socially responsible corporate citizens. They practice what they preach, and they concern themselves with diversity, community engagement, and environmental stewardship - in addition to turning a profit.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
HONG KONG - A boat packed with holiday revelers collided Monday with a ferry and sank off Hong Kong, killing at least 36 people and injuring dozens more, authorities said. The boat was carrying staff members of a utility company and their family members to Hong Kong's famed Victoria Harbour to watch a fireworks display Monday night on the long holiday weekend celebrating China's National Day and mid-autumn festival. It was carrying about 120 people when it collided with the ferry near Lamma Island off the southwestern coast of Hong Kong Island.
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