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Environmental Protection Agency

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April 14, 1994 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Kostmayer is eating an Earth-friendly lunch - the coffee cup is biodegradable and the sandwich wrapper is recyclable. "Everything gets recycled here. Everything," said Kostmayer, gulping lunch at his desk at the Environmental Protection Agency in Center City. The restaurant where he got the lunch used to use plastic foam cups, he points out. "We got them to stop. " Clearly, the man is in his element. As a congressman from Bucks County for 14 years, Kostmayer devoted a lot of time to the environment, writing bills to protect the Delaware and Allegheny Rivers, rain forests and wilderness areas, and to toughen safety standards at nuclear reactors.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | by Ramona Smith and Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writers
For America's Mayor or Gov. Ridge, a proposal to curb air pollution can be a two-edged sword. City and state honchos want to strengthen the economy, and they say they alsowant healthy air. Now, with industry groups warning that new Environmental Protection Agency proposals could leave the nation bleeding jobs, both leaders could face some heat in the upcoming debate. But neither has a direct role in setting the standards. Their role comes later, with Ridge playing a major part in what steps Pennsylvania would take to meet EPA standards.
NEWS
September 19, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 3,500-acre hazardous-waste site at McGuire Air Force Base in Burlington County will be cleaned up under an agreement signed this week between the Air Force and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA said yesterday. The agreement calls for the removal of nickel, mercury, PCBs, and other contaminants at the McGuire Air Force Base Superfund Site in New Hanover Township, the agency said. It "is a significant milestone that will benefit the people of New Jersey and the environment," said George Pavlou, acting EPA regional administrator.
NEWS
March 1, 2002
I resign today from the Environmental Protection Agency after twelve years of service . . . I am grateful for the opportunities I have been given, and leave with a deep admiration for the men and women of EPA . . . . Their faith in the agency's mission is an inspiring example to those who still believe that government should stand for the public interest. But I cannot leave without sharing my frustration about the fate of our enforcement actions against power companies that have violated the Clean Air Act..
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Peter Kostmayer, the former congressman recently jostled out of his job as regional head of the Environmental Protection Agency, may play a role in President Clinton's Pennsylvania re-election campaign. "I have been approached by the White House," Kostmayer said yesterday. "I've been asked if I'd be willing to be helpful in reaching out to environmental groups and community groups, and I've said that I would. " The former Democratic congressman from Bucks County said he's still a "strong supporter" of Clinton even though he's being pushed out of his environmental post at the request of EPA Administrator Carol Browner.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
More than a decade ago, Ronald Reagan thought he had a mandate to roll back America's environmental rules. He went after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a meat ax. Played politics with Superfund cleanups. And, in James Watt, appointed an Interior secretary who happily abided the excesses of logging and mining interests. It turned out that American voters liked Mr. Reagan fine, but they didn't endorse his anti-environmental crusade. Indeed, by 1988, presidential candidate George Bush was at least campaigning on the phrase: "I am an environmentalist.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Two students from Peirce Middle School in West Chester will be honored tomorrow by the Environmental Protection Agency for a water-quality testing project they put together. Justin Olexy and Ruth Yang, now in eighth grade, won first place in the water-project category in the spring at the National Science Olympiad in Kansas City, Mo. The team from Peirce took third place in the overall competition. The students tested water from a variety of sources, including tap water and water taken from area streams.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Lawyers yesterday sought court approval of a $184,000 civil penalty in a case alleging haphazard removal of asbestos from a Center City office building. The case involves an asbestos removal project undertaken in 1985 at the Widener Building on Chestnut Street near Broad. Asbestos, used as a fireproofing or insulating material, can cause lung disease. Although not admitting wrongdoing, project general contractor Sullivan Construction Co. Inc., building owner Widener Associates Limited Partnership, building manager Binswanger Management Corp.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Dozens of drums and hundreds of smaller containers - most believed to contain hazardous chemicals - will be cleared from a former factory in North Philadelphia by the Environmental Protection Agency to remove the danger of fire or explosion. White-suited workers yesterday began packing up containers of assorted chemicals at the former Merit Products Co. paint-mixing facility on Indiana Avenue near 19th Street. "Altogether, we're talking about 500 containers of various sizes," EPA spokeswoman Francesca Di Cosmo said.
NEWS
May 30, 1986
PCBs won't be going down to the sea in a ship this summer after all. A planned test of ocean incineration of toxic wastes contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls has been postponed by the Environmental Protection Agency until more information is obtained and final regulations are written governing such a process. That decision by EPA Assistant Administrator Lawrence Jensen was wise from both a technological and public policy standpoint. An actual test burn, planned for 140 miles off the New Jersey-Maryland coast, is acceptable only after every aspect of the incineration plan - transportation of waste, storage on land, loading and shipment to the incineration site - is scrutinized and tightly regulated.
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NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Standing outside a Montgomery County military base where chemicals from firefighting foam has contaminated public drinking water, two local congressmen made a bipartisan appeal Monday for stricter drinking-water regulations. "Residents are understandably concerned these chemicals are to blame for their health concerns," said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.). Boyle traveled Monday to Naval Air Station Willow Grove with Republican Rep. Patrick Meehan to apply public pressure to the Environmental Protection Agency to finalize new standards for safe levels of chemicals in drinking water.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The federal investigation into the improper use of a pesticide that apparently poisoned a Delaware family vacationing in the U.S. Virgin Islands has expanded west to another Caribbean island, Puerto Rico. The Environmental Protection Agency reported Thursday that there was evidence that the pesticide, methyl bromide, had been used improperly "at various locations" in Puerto Rico. However, officials were unable to further characterize the settings - whether they were residences, resorts, or other locations.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Camden has dismissed a lawsuit in which two Moorestown couples alleged that their families were exposed to health risks and a loss of property value because of underground contamination caused by a toxic chemical spill at a plant now owned by Lockheed Martin. Judge Jerome B. Simandle said no evidence was presented to show that the concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) vapors found in the Wexford neighborhood across from the plant "pose an imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER A fog of thick, black diesel smoke spewed into the neighborhood air as Horace Strand watched the endless line of trucks rumble along Thurlow Street, just before dawn on the day 23 years ago that the Westinghouse incinerator opened along the Chester riverfront. It brought him to tears. Dust and debris from the trucks headed to the incinerator and to another plant that sterilized contaminated medical waste became the bane of the neighborhood. Residents complained of respiratory problems.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: My daughter recently obtained estimates for replacing 17 windows in her home, which is more than 50 years old. One contractor mentioned the Environmental Protection Agency's new requirement of lead-paint precautions, containment, and other things, which would add $500 to the project cost. He also stated that she could first test for lead paint ($60), but because of the age of her home, the house more than likely contained lead paint. The EPA website was a little confusing and wordy, so I'm not sure if she is required to follow the EPA guidelines.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
NEWS PHOTOS of oil-covered pelicans off the coast of Louisiana drives home the damage being done by the BP oil catastrophe. And evidence continues to gush out that the disaster could have been avoided if environmental regulations already on the books had been enforced. No wonder a growing number of Americans scream at their televisions - and their government -that more must be done to prevent unnatural disasters like these from happening again. So it is downright surreal that the U.S. Senate will vote Thursday on a measure that would gut the ability of the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate other dangers to the environment caused by the "dirty energy" - in this case, greenhouse gases that cause global warming.
NEWS
January 8, 2010
The head of the regional office for the Environmental Protection Agency has asked the New Jersey Legislature not to delay implementation of 2008 water-quality rules that would limit the installation of septic systems and sewer-line expansions. Judith Enck, the regional administrator, whose agency has awarded $1.6 million to New Jersey to create the new water management plans, sent letters Tuesday to Assembly Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr. (D., Camden) and Senate President Richard J. Codey (D., Essex)
NEWS
October 13, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When John Murray was shopping for an artificial-turf field for Camden Catholic High School, he found a wealth of information to help him make a decision. The piles of documents he gathered, however, did not include a federal report that might answer widening concerns about toxic chemicals found in the ground-up tires that provide the turf's cushioning. That's because the report doesn't exist - yet. It's been more than a year since the Environmental Protection Agency began looking to see if the turf releases such chemicals and might be harmful to children.
NEWS
September 19, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 3,500-acre hazardous-waste site at McGuire Air Force Base in Burlington County will be cleaned up under an agreement signed this week between the Air Force and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA said yesterday. The agreement calls for the removal of nickel, mercury, PCBs, and other contaminants at the McGuire Air Force Base Superfund Site in New Hanover Township, the agency said. It "is a significant milestone that will benefit the people of New Jersey and the environment," said George Pavlou, acting EPA regional administrator.
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's hazardous-waste and wetlands programs lack effective oversight and quality control, according to a federal audit released yesterday. In a routine review, the Environmental Protection Agency found flaws in the way the state runs the federally funded programs. It also said DEP had failed to correct similar procedural and policy problems identified in water programs in 2006. "This audit should set alarms off for New Jersey residents," said state Sierra Club director Jeff Tittel, citing "disasters" such as Kiddie Kollege, a day-care center built on a former thermometer factory in Gloucester County.
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