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Environmental Science

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NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Working in the glow of her own patch of sunlight, Jessica Ruehr sat down on a rock next to Naylor's Run Creek and began to draw. Pressing blue crayon on red construction paper, the 10-year-old drew a V- shaped maple growing just a few stepping stones away, on the opposite side of the creek bed. Observing her progress was Clarence Montgomery, a U.S. Forest Service summer intern from Arizona. "I get a very good feeling being here and working with the kids," Montgomery said. "If we do our part in teaching them about the environment and how to care for their world, then we'll build another generation of understanding.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by files and boxes - "amoeba to chemical," "salt marsh to zooplankton" - Ruth Patrick bends her head to peer into the microscope. "Ah, here," she says with a smile of satisfaction. "They're small, but they're lovely. " They are, to her, "my diatoms. " One-celled algae - as elegant and ornamental as snowflakes - that are present in virtually every body of water, they launched her career, cemented her renown, and defined her life. At age 99, Patrick is still working with them.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
At the start of each school year, middle-school students in the School District's environmental science magnet program sit down with a teacher and plan the project they'll work on that year. "It's important that the project is based on the student's interest, not the teacher's," said Dom Fedele, a teacher in the program assigned to Baldi Middle School. "Because it's something they want to investigate, students are motivated about their projects. They design the experiment to test their hypothesis.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tiffaney Faith Davies, 20, who loved the arts and helping others, died Monday in a car accident on the Schuylkill Expressway in Conshohocken, Montgomery County. Born in Philadelphia, she lived in Marlton for 18 years before moving to Mount Laurel two months ago. Miss Davies was a junior environmental-science major at Chestnut Hill College, where she sang in the chamber choir and women's chorale. She also was a member of the college's interdisciplinary scholars program for honor students.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
All those childhood years of building dams, catching minnows and finding turtles in Sandy Run Creek behind his house had an aquatic effect on John Ousey, who still spends a lot of time with water. "I spent most of my childhood in that creek," said Ousey, 45, of West Whiteland, who grew up in Roslyn, Montgomery County. "We'd pile up the rocks and sand and end up with a little pool, and if you were lucky, you'd come out the next day and there might be a little trout in there. " Now, instead of playing in an abundance of water, Ousey, assistant professor in environmental science at Penn State's Delaware County campus, has become a local expert in drought - but not necessarily what happens when there is too little rain.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna W. Pitz, 65, of Paoli, former executive director of the GreenSpace Alliance and a major figure in the open-space movement in Southeastern Pennsylvania, died Friday, Sept. 11, of multiple system atrophy at Tel Hai Retirement Community, Honey Brook. Born in East Stroudsburg, Pa., Ms. Pitz graduated in 1971 from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa, with a bachelor's degree in biology and education. In 1978, she earned a master's degree in landscape architecture from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y. From 2008 to 2011, when she resigned for health reasons, Ms. Pitz led the GreenSpace Alliance, a nonprofit in Philadelphia consisting of the leaders of environmental groups and land conservation agencies.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Catastrophic effects of global climate change may soon overshadow familiar environmental hazards and deserve much more attention from scientists and the public, President Clinton's senior environmental science adviser said yesterday. Increased flooding, more droughts and wildfires, and invasions of exotic pests could result from climate-transforming temperature increases, Rosina Bierbaum told scientists gathered here for the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Bierbaum, associate director for environment at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, warned that such severe effects "could be real showstoppers.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Hiking through the woods of Maine or sailing along the state's rocky coastline may seem like the ideal summer vacation, but for Peter Corcoran of Wallingford, it is an outline of his summer work schedule. Corcoran, an assistant professor of education at Swarthmore College, is spending his time away from the classroom by instructing science teachers in hands-on techniques for natural science and environmental education. His summer classroom is the great outdoors of New England. "Earth Day 1970 and certainly 1990 made people more aware of the need to teach about the environment, but many teachers were never prepared to teach this subject," said Corcoran.
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | By Christine Flanagan
In the charred pygmy pine forests of Warren Grove, a group of students stands as tall as the trees. Pinecones are split wide from fires; a startling shoot of green pushes out from the bark of a blackened trunk. This forest is but one section of New Jersey's Pinelands, which occupies almost a quarter of our state and is the largest body of open space between Boston and Richmond, Va. Summer's here, and most students have shut their dog-eared textbooks. However, one unique group is about to enter a classroom unlike any they've experienced - the wild outdoors of New Jersey.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Antoine McClary, 10, said he never gave a second thought to the schoolyard dirt compressed and hardened by hundreds of small feet during thousands of hours of playtime. For this fourth grader, the soil wasn't related to school, except as an escape from it, a part of the outdoor world of recess. His opinion changed, Antoine said, when his class began a study of the soil. "I looked through the soil with a toothpick and found half an eggshell and some seeds," he said. "My friend Kenneth [Middleton]
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NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna W. Pitz, 65, of Paoli, former executive director of the GreenSpace Alliance and a major figure in the open-space movement in Southeastern Pennsylvania, died Friday, Sept. 11, of multiple system atrophy at Tel Hai Retirement Community, Honey Brook. Born in East Stroudsburg, Pa., Ms. Pitz graduated in 1971 from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa, with a bachelor's degree in biology and education. In 1978, she earned a master's degree in landscape architecture from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y. From 2008 to 2011, when she resigned for health reasons, Ms. Pitz led the GreenSpace Alliance, a nonprofit in Philadelphia consisting of the leaders of environmental groups and land conservation agencies.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Independence Seaport Museum announced Thursday that it had received four gifts totaling $13.9 million, more than doubling its endowment and marking one of the largest gift totals ever made to the Penn's Landing institution, founded in 1960. John Brady, head of the museum for four years, called the contributions "an endorsement" of the museum's direction, which he characterized as akin to "a transformation. " The gifts announced were $4.5 million from newly elected board chair Peter McCausland; $4.4 million from longtime museum supporter Peter R. Kellogg; $3 million from H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, owner of Philadelphia Media Network and publisher of The Inquirer; and $2 million from an anonymous contributor.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Lacovara has spent the last decade on a paleontologist's dream project: unearthing and analyzing the skeleton of a 65-ton dinosaur from Argentina. On Tuesday, the Drexel University scientist is speaking about his work at a breakfast meeting of South Jersey business leaders. For Lacovara, 53, that might be almost as rewarding. A successful career in science these days requires a steady focus on drumming up support - maybe courting politicians, attending receptions with benefactors, explaining research to laypeople.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to build a 15,000-square-foot facility at the Chester incinerator plant to house garbage imported by rail from New York City has been put on the shelf. After some residents raised questions, the Chester City Planning Commission tabled a vote on the plan for 30 days. The commission had been expected to approve permits Wednesday night for the Covanta Energy proposal, but 12 protesters showed up at the meeting asking for a review of the project. Covanta, which has 100 employees in Chester, has operated the trash incinerator on Highland Avenue since 1992.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
CENTER CITY A ceramic disk, cooled by liquid nitrogen, hovered in the air above a silvery magnet. Nearby, a table was covered with large-scale plastic models of ribosomes, the amorphous, cellular protein factories that are essential to life. Across the hall were a hard hat, headphones, and a power saw mighty enough to cut through rock. It was a vivid reminder that science comes in many forms. The occasion Tuesday morning was Laureates' Laboratory, a forum where winners of this year's Franklin Institute science awards conducted an uncontrolled experiment of sorts.
NEWS
August 22, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roy F. Weston, 96, of Newtown Square, founder and chairman emeritus of Weston Solutions Inc., a groundbreaking environmental engineering firm, died Saturday at home. Mr. Weston established his company, Roy F. Weston Inc., in Newtown Square with 10 employees in 1957. When he retired in 1991, it was headquartered on a 53-acre former estate in West Chester and employed 3,000 people in four laboratories and 45 offices throughout the country. "We don't want to be the biggest; we just want to be the best," he told a reporter at the time.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by files and boxes - "amoeba to chemical," "salt marsh to zooplankton" - Ruth Patrick bends her head to peer into the microscope. "Ah, here," she says with a smile of satisfaction. "They're small, but they're lovely. " They are, to her, "my diatoms. " One-celled algae - as elegant and ornamental as snowflakes - that are present in virtually every body of water, they launched her career, cemented her renown, and defined her life. At age 99, Patrick is still working with them.
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | By Christine Flanagan
In the charred pygmy pine forests of Warren Grove, a group of students stands as tall as the trees. Pinecones are split wide from fires; a startling shoot of green pushes out from the bark of a blackened trunk. This forest is but one section of New Jersey's Pinelands, which occupies almost a quarter of our state and is the largest body of open space between Boston and Richmond, Va. Summer's here, and most students have shut their dog-eared textbooks. However, one unique group is about to enter a classroom unlike any they've experienced - the wild outdoors of New Jersey.
NEWS
June 6, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Penncrest High School in the Rose Tree Media School District has again come out a winner in the state Envirothon competition. The school's team of juniors and seniors took first place at the competition May 21 at Montour Preserve, attended by more than 320 high school students. "We have great kids who are very motivated in the study of everything from aquatics to forestry," said team adviser and high school science teacher Mark Samilenko. Members of the Penncrest team are: Christina Kleinberg, David Cohen, Elizabeth Pondo, Nicole Shapiro and Brad Potter.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tiffaney Faith Davies, 20, who loved the arts and helping others, died Monday in a car accident on the Schuylkill Expressway in Conshohocken, Montgomery County. Born in Philadelphia, she lived in Marlton for 18 years before moving to Mount Laurel two months ago. Miss Davies was a junior environmental-science major at Chestnut Hill College, where she sang in the chamber choir and women's chorale. She also was a member of the college's interdisciplinary scholars program for honor students.
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