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Epilepsy

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NEWS
March 9, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
British doctors reported last week that they were using magnetic scanning techniques to identify brain tumors that cause epilepsy and removing the tumors with almost total success. The tumors have been identified as a cause of epilepsy only in the past five years, and doctors have just started using new scanning methods to find them. But neurologists at Britain's National Society for Epilepsy said they had used magnetic resonance scanning to find the tumors and then surgically removed them with great success.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson said Thursday it was recalling two lots of the prescription drug Topamax, often used to treat epilepsy, because of four complaints about odors that the company attributes to chemicals used to treat shipping pallets. The 100mg tablets (60 per bottle) were in lots 0KG110 and 0LG222. Lot numbers can be seen on the packaging. Patients can contact their doctor, pharmacist or the company to return the products. The pills were produced by the Ortho-McNeil Neurologics Division of Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc., a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1986 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
Welcome to the real world, kids. A look at "Disney Sunday Movie" suggests that the studio's new management, under Michael Eisner, is attempting to lure young audiences with less fantasy and much more reality than Uncle Walt ever used. This weekend's ABC film, "A Fighting Choice" (Channel 6 at 7 p.m. Sunday), is about teenager Kellin Taylor (played by Patrick Dempsey) who suffers from epilepsy. His concerned, devoted parents, Meg and Thad (Karen Valentine and Beau Bridges) are protective of the lad, who desperately wants to lead a normal life.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Epilepsy, a seizure-causing disorder, occurs in cats and dogs as well as human beings. According to scientists at the Cornell University School of Veterinary Medicine, a genetic factor among dogs "has been proven or is highly suspicious as causing epilepsy in the German shepherd, beagle, keeshond, Belgian tervuren and Belgian shepherd. " Though no genetic factors have yet been found, the Cornell scientists also report a high incidence in poodles, wire-haired terriers, cocker spaniels, Saint Bernards, Irish setters, collies, boxers and dachshunds.
LIVING
January 19, 1998 | By Jonathan Bor, BALTIMORE SUN Inquirer staff writer Stacey Burling contributed to this article
In the 15 years she has battled epilepsy, Erinn Farver has tried countless medications and even explored the possibility of a brain operation. But the drugs have done little but make her sleepy, and her seizures are not the type that disappear with surgery. Now, she is hoping that the latest innovation in epilepsy therapy - an electronic brain stimulator - will make the difference. On Dec. 15, surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center made her one of the first patients in the nation to receive the device, which looks like a hockey puck and is inserted in the chest just beneath the collarbone.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and Valeant Pharmaceuticals International say they may have to wait an extra three months for the U.S. regulatory review of their potential epilepsy treatment ezogabine. The two companies said today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has extended its target date under the Prescription Drug User Act to review ezogabine to Nov. 30 from Aug. 30. Ezogabine is designed for patients already taking one to three other anti-epileptic drugs. Glaxo, which is based in London and has operations in the Philadelphia area, and Valeant, which is based in Aliso Viejo, Calif.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Miller felt he had waited his whole life for Carolina. "She was exceptional by every measure," he said, "smart, full of life, beautiful. " When she died, suddenly, from an epileptic seizure in August 2011, at age 26 and not even two years after their wedding, he was driven to do something in her memory, to find meaning in his grief. So he set out to try something a tad crazy, arranging 50 concerts in 50 states this weekend - including by guitar great Eric Clapton - all to raise epilepsy awareness.
LIVING
April 3, 2000 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Much has been done to help many people live well with epilepsy - the subtle, complex, sometimes devastating, brain disorder that afflicts more than 2 million Americans. But "Curing Epilepsy" was the goal last week of an unusual White House-initiated meeting of patients, clinicians and researchers. The cure - or cures - for epilepsy may still be a long way off, said Gerald Fischbach, the conference chairman and director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a unit of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia researchers have detected part of the virus that causes cervical cancer in a surprising place: a congenital brain malformation that causes an intractable form of epilepsy in children. This is the first study to uncover evidence of the microbe - human papillomavirus (HPV) - in the brain. It is also the first to suggest that an infection in the fetal brain leads to the malformation, which has no known genetic or environmental cause. Peter Crino, a neurologist in the Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center at Temple University, conducted the study with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Repurposing an existing drug, researchers in Lancaster and Philadelphia reported last week that they had prevented seizures in an extremely rare form of epilepsy and suggested future lines of attack against more common types of the disorder. The immediate finding involves a neurodevelopmental disorder almost unheard of in the general population. But an estimated 4 percent of Old Order Mennonites in Lancaster County carry the genetic mutation. Offspring of two carriers develop what the community calls "pretzel syndrome" because of the odd patterns babies form with their limbs.
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SPORTS
November 13, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer jneiburg@phillynews.com
IT WAS probably the hardest practice the Flyers had since training camp, and there weren't many smiles when players started filtering off the ice. Then Jake Voracek, who has yet to score this season, saw Liam Idzi and couldn't help but smile. Liam, 8, came from Madison, Wis., with his family and nurse, thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Liam is in a wheelchair because he's been diagnosed with cerebral palsy and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a difficult-to-treat form of epilepsy.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Three million Americans have some form of epilepsy; in 68 percent of the cases the cause remains unknown. More than a third of patients with uncontrollable seizures are not effectively treated with current therapies, which are often prescribed on a trial-and-error basis. Now, the Epilepsy Genetic Initiative will offer a project to uncover the causes, develop precision treatments, and design possible cures for epilepsies at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and seven other academic medical centers.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state Senate on Wednesday passed legislation legalizing the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. But the legislation, approved by a vote of 43-7, faces an uncertain fate. GOP leaders in the House, where the bill heads next, say the federal government ought to take the lead on drug policy. And Gov. Corbett has said he is opposed to legalizing marijuana in any form. The legislation mirrors medical marijuana laws in 23 states that require patients seeking access to medical cannabis to have a doctor's authorization.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tina DeSilvio is so determined to give her teenage daughter marijuana, she is mixing cannabis buds with 180-proof alcohol and letting the concoction evaporate into a sticky, olive-green substance to add to coconut oil. Jenna, 14, cannot smoke marijuana, but she can swallow a half-milliliter of the oil - a few drops - when it is stirred into applesauce or yogurt four times a day. "Don't I sound like the mother of the year?" DeSilvio asks, chuckling. Her yellow kitchen counter displays a minutely calibrated scale, a dropper, a 9- by 11-inch glass baking dish, and a clear, tightly sealed plastic container of pungent medical marijuana.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013
NEUROLOGIST David Perlmutter has hit the top of the New York Times best-seller list for his provocative nutrition book, Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers . He argues that carbohydrates (even the whole-grain carbs that we think of as the good ones) are linked to a range of modern-day maladies, including Alzheimer's, depression, headaches, epilepsy and ADHD. Since we already know the havoc that carbs can wreak on our waistlines, could he be on to something?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Repurposing an existing drug, researchers in Lancaster and Philadelphia reported last week that they had prevented seizures in an extremely rare form of epilepsy and suggested future lines of attack against more common types of the disorder. The immediate finding involves a neurodevelopmental disorder almost unheard of in the general population. But an estimated 4 percent of Old Order Mennonites in Lancaster County carry the genetic mutation. Offspring of two carriers develop what the community calls "pretzel syndrome" because of the odd patterns babies form with their limbs.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Miller felt he had waited his whole life for Carolina. "She was exceptional by every measure," he said, "smart, full of life, beautiful. " When she died, suddenly, from an epileptic seizure in August 2011, at age 26 and not even two years after their wedding, he was driven to do something in her memory, to find meaning in his grief. So he set out to try something a tad crazy, arranging 50 concerts in 50 states this weekend - including by guitar great Eric Clapton - all to raise epilepsy awareness.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia researchers have detected part of the virus that causes cervical cancer in a surprising place: a congenital brain malformation that causes an intractable form of epilepsy in children. This is the first study to uncover evidence of the microbe - human papillomavirus (HPV) - in the brain. It is also the first to suggest that an infection in the fetal brain leads to the malformation, which has no known genetic or environmental cause. Peter Crino, a neurologist in the Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center at Temple University, conducted the study with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
Group's aid to Akin revealed JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Despite publicly disavowing candidate Todd Akin after his "legitimate rape" remark, the National Republican Senatorial Committee quietly sent $760,000 to Missouri in a last-ditch attempt to aid Akin's unsuccessful bid to unseat Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. The long-suspected money shuffling, which had never previously been confirmed, is detailed in a campaign finance report filed this week by the Missouri Republican State Committee.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the early morning hours before the start of the second day of the 2005 NFL draft, Joe Banner awoke to a crash . . . crash . . . crash. By the time Banner reached the hallway, the pounding had stopped. His 10-year-old son, Jason, was sprawled on the bathroom tile. "I found him in the bathroom, on the floor and totally incoherent," Banner said. Jason was having a seizure and had been stumbling into walls. His father thought it might be a stroke. The Banner family rushed to the emergency room at Children's Hospital.
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