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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
In a city of 8.3 million people, they kept finding each other: on random subway lines, at two different birthday parties in the East Village. Of course, those meetings weren't complete coincidence; both Annie and Yosef were students at Manhattan's Jewish Theological Seminary, studying to become rabbis. Friends noticed the spark before they did. Yosef kept protesting, "But Annie and I are such good friends," and buddies would retort, "Don't you see, you're not just friends?" Finally, he saw. After a few months of dating, they were inviting one another to their families' Passover celebrations.
SPORTS
April 11, 2011 | Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Masters officials have apologized to sports columnist Tara Sullivan of the Bergen (N.J.) Record after she was denied entry to a locker room for a post-tournament interview. Augusta National spokesman Steve Ethun says a security guard acted improperly in stopping Sullivan, since club policy is to provide equal access to all reporters. Several female reporters at the tournament confirmed they had made numerous trips to the locker room for interviews in the past.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the classic one-person, one-vote concept. In this case, telephone customers get ballots to pick the company they want to carry their long-distance calls. And they are permitted to change their votes at any time and switch companies, for a $5 fee. Before AT&T's divestiture, all long-distance calls placed by dialing "1- plus" went over AT&T. Now telephone customers can select the company that will carry their "1-plus" calls. Customers are choosing by checking off the company of their choice on ballots that began to go out in 1984.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The William Penn school board has made a $30,000 out-of-court settlement in what is believed to be the first student-against-student sexual harassment lawsuit to go to trial under the "equal access to education" law. The school board approved the move in a 6-1 vote at a special meeting Tuesday night. The civil suit, filed in 1997 by a former special-education student at Penn Wood East Junior High School, had originally been won by the William Penn School District. However, last August, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ordered a new trial after a three-judge panel unanimously decided that the jury had been given too rigorous a legal standard to use in evaluating the student's allegations.
NEWS
July 4, 1986
The comments attributed to the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission in the article "Racial rancor on Tyler Avenue" should not be misinterpreted. The issue, whether attitudes can be changed by law, is not relevant. The evolution of the law, from Plessy vs. Ferguson to the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act of 1955, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the state's 1982 ethnic intimidation law, occurred with changes in opinion among all sections of the public. The acts' primary concern has been discriminatory behavior.
SPORTS
October 17, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Three women golfers filed a complaint against a southeastern Pennsylvania country club over policies that allegedly discriminate against women. The women accused Coatesville Country Club of restricting female members' access to the golf course, having policies that diminish their role in the governance of the club and, until Memorial Day, maintaining a male-only dining area. The country club denies that it discriminates against women. Joyce Pillets, Janet Stewart and Judy Uhrich, all longtime members of the club, asked the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission to intervene on their behalf.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | BY GEORGE F. WILL
John Silber, sandpapery president of Boston University, might have been governor of Massachusetts - he was the Democratic nominee in 1990 - were he not given to speaking his formidable mind as bluntly as he did when a voter asked what we should teach our children. "Teach them that they are going to die," he said. And have a nice day. His point was that children need a sense of reality, beginning with the fact that life is short and that living nobly may depend on an early understanding of that brevity.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Superintendent Mort Sherman pledged to the school board and community last night that by February, he will issue a final recommendation on how to resolve the district's equity, overcrowding and aging facilities - and that he has a way to pay for them, too. Sherman said one of his main objectives would be to smooth out serious inequities among schools on different sides of the township, including those between the two high schools. This is one of the few times that an administrator has tackled the issue head-on.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
AT&T, the nation's largest long-distance phone carrier, moved yesterday to block its British counterpart from setting up business in the United States unless AT&T can get equal access to Britain. American Telephone & Telegraph Co. asked the Federal Communications Commission to withhold permission for British Telecom North America to serve other countries from the United States. At the same time, AT&T unveiled plans to enter the British market, applying yesterday to British authorities for a license to offer service within Britain and from that country to the United States.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN
In yet another triumph for human rights and social justice, a Maryland law declaring that the Burning Tree golf club, near Washington, must either admit women, or pay $315,000 in added annual property taxes, has been upheld. Other Maryland clubs that assign separate tee times, party rooms and restaurants to women members face similar punitive sanctions. Hopefully, the Supreme Court ruling will "put an end to (this) chapter of Maryland discrimination history," said Stuart Comstock-Gay of Maryland's ACLU; Jennifer Burdick of the state Commission on Human Relations concurred.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
In a city of 8.3 million people, they kept finding each other: on random subway lines, at two different birthday parties in the East Village. Of course, those meetings weren't complete coincidence; both Annie and Yosef were students at Manhattan's Jewish Theological Seminary, studying to become rabbis. Friends noticed the spark before they did. Yosef kept protesting, "But Annie and I are such good friends," and buddies would retort, "Don't you see, you're not just friends?" Finally, he saw. After a few months of dating, they were inviting one another to their families' Passover celebrations.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
See the person behind the sign Finally, the individuals scouring the city streets are getting a voice and the ability to present their perspective to those who do not understand, or are quick to pass judgment and shame ("Life on the median," July 19). Several times over the past couple months, I've ventured into the city with my sister for doctor appointments and each time witnessed individuals similar to Samantha, who was profiled by Inquirer reporter Melissa Dribben. When I looked at them, to me, they were not addicts simply working the streets in order to pay for their addiction.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
When the Rev. Max Myers announced his candidacy last week for the Democratic nomination for governor of Pennsylvania, rival John Hanger dumped a load of "oppo" on his head. Who? What? Most Keystone State voters have not yet, it is safe to say, tuned in to the 2014 governor's race, but the competition to replace Gov. Corbett grows more heated by the day. At least a dozen have declared, said they're considering it, or have been listed as likely suspects. Hanger, the former state environmental secretary who was the first announced candidate, felt the need to deploy negative "opposition research" to attack the second, Myers, an ordained Pentecostalist minister from Cumberland County, as a religious zealot.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I'M A SUCKER for long-shot candidates running campaigns that seem to stem more from political fiction than any reality. As such, I cannot ignore one Max Myers, who is now officially running for governor. How much of a long shot is he? Well, the only reason he has a prayer is that he's an ordained minister. How unusual is his campaign? He's a Pentecostal minister from central Pennsylvania running as a Democrat. He's traveling the state on an announcement tour that started Monday in Philly at the William Way LGBT Community Center and ends Wednesday at an Allentown brewery.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Breaking new ground, the U.S. Education Department is telling schools they must include students with disabilities in sports programs or provide equal alternative options. The directive, reminiscent of the Title IX expansion of athletic opportunities for women, could bring sweeping changes to school budgets and locker rooms for years to come. Schools would be required to make "reasonable modifications" for students with disabilities or create parallel athletic programs that have comparable standing to mainstream programs.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A few weeks ago, an activist in a wheelchair was trying to make her way to the second-floor Capitol office of Gov. Corbett's scheduler when a guard stopped her at the elevator. As Pam Auer tells it, the guard said she couldn't ride up because she had no state-issued badge - the kind routinely given to state employees, lobbyists, and journalists - and no appointment. Auer could see other badgeless people streaming into elevators or climbing the stairs without being questioned.
SPORTS
April 11, 2011 | Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Masters officials have apologized to sports columnist Tara Sullivan of the Bergen (N.J.) Record after she was denied entry to a locker room for a post-tournament interview. Augusta National spokesman Steve Ethun says a security guard acted improperly in stopping Sullivan, since club policy is to provide equal access to all reporters. Several female reporters at the tournament confirmed they had made numerous trips to the locker room for interviews in the past.
NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are about 850 listings for the City of Philadelphia in the phone book, covering more than four pages in tiny type. But as of midnight Dec. 31, there's only one number Philadelphians will need to know: 311. The city's much-anticipated new nonemergency call center will formally open Jan. 1. In theory, callers will soon have a single access point to request city services like tree trimming, obtain information such as rec center hours, or...
NEWS
August 8, 2007 | By Jane Marie Glodek
The invitation for my friends' summer solstice party finally arrived. The mailman recognized my address from the indecipherable scribble on the envelope. "Champagne, finger-food, desserts, live music and a multi-age tap dancing troupe," it said. I've got to go, I thought. This could be the best invite I've had in years. Then I asked myself: Can I get into their house? Up the steps using my rolling walker, quad cane or wheelchair? Figuring it all out was like putting together a puzzle.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By RON MANUTO & SEAN PATRICK O'ROURKE
PRESIDENT Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address 140 years ago this week. Although one of the shortest speeches in our history, it is one that continues to instruct, challenge and provoke - even today. On July 3, 1863, 50,000 men, wounded and dead, lay scattered outside a small town in Pennsylvania. The Civil War had brought the nation to its knees in a three-day battle. It was a catastrophe in the ugliest kind of war, a civil war. The rot and stench of the battlefield was inconceivable to those who walked among the dead and wounded.
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