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Equal Opportunity

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NEWS
May 18, 1989
Ever since Mayor Goode rolled up those staggering victory margins in the black community in spite of the MOVE bombing, a fair number of white Philadelphians have wondered whether any white candidate stood a chance of beating a black in a high-profile, citywide Democratic primary. Walter M. Phillips Jr.'s victory on Tuesday cast new light on that notion. Not only did Mr. Phillips, who is white, easily win the Democratic primary for district attorney, but he carried 14 of the city's 30 predominantly black wards against Wendella Fox, his black opponent.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Matthew Miller
The death this week of John Rawls, the most influential political philosopher of our era, suggests a natural sermon at this season of giving thanks. For Rawls' contribution was a relentless focus on the role luck plays in human affairs, and how we would order society if we were properly grateful for good luck, and compassionate toward the luckless. Rawls' developed this idea in his seminal 1971 book, A Theory of Justice. It's a dense and at times forbidding work, but the kernel at the heart of Rawls' thinking is simple and compelling.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | By WILLARD G. ROUSE 3d
Strange as it may seem, it was the death of a remarkable Philadelphian this past summer that jolted many of us into seeing what an inspiration his life represented. Having experienced the ills of a racially divided society, Eversley Vaughan, an advocate for city neighborhoods, stood up and spoke out against inequity and prejudice. His voice was not eloquent, his actions not spectacular, yet his message was compelling. Eversley never let us forget that the poison of racism continues to affect our whole social structure.
SPORTS
November 26, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Money doesn't matter. That is the message that Jim O'Brien, who is in his first season as the 76ers' coach, delivers when he chooses his starting lineup and settles on his rotation. Production, not a player's contract, will dictate minutes under O'Brien, who has made that clear from the first day of training camp. His point was amplified once again during Wednesday night's 110-97 victory over the Boston Celtics at the Wachovia Center. (The Sixers will shoot for their second straight win when they host the Washington Wizards at 1 p.m. today.
NEWS
October 27, 2005 | By Joe Green
Public schools have the right to sponsor girls' sports teams, but in contact sports, boys have no right to make those teams coed. Under Title IX, the federal civil rights law that applies to public education, girls have won the right to equal athletic opportunity with boys, who historically enjoyed a privileged status in public school sports. Now, high school boys mock the goal of "equal opportunity" when they use their advantages of size and strength to take over such girls sports as field hockey.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | By COLMAN McCARTHY
It's no more than pseudo-feminism, hokey at best, to be hailing the example of Capt. Linda Bray as an argument for equality in the military. Bray is the Army company commander who led 30 U.S. combat troops in a three-hour shootout against a Panama Defense Forces stronghold in last month's invasion. Bray's original mission was to "neutralize" a PDF kennel, with the annihilation of Manuel Noriega's attack dogs as part of the Pentagon's plan to restore democracy to Panama. When soldiers were found bunkering in the kennel, Capt.
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By MARCUS HAYES, Daily News Staff Writer hayesm@phillynews.com
ON MOMENTOUS occasions, excited by opportunity and exhuasted by the process, principals tend to utter phrases that ring for years to come. This is where we get the gold standard of quotes; pearls with a luster that lingers for generations. Eagles head coach Chip Kelly possesses the gift of glib. Certainly, a few of his cleverer quips from Thursday's interviews are worth gilding: On the gravity of his decision to leave Oregon, and the fallout for his players, staff and bosses: "You're not just making reservations for dinner.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The controversy began in 1968, at a time of growing racial tension in the city and the schools. The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission told the Philadelphia School District to devise a desegregation plan. Nothing happened for the next two years - only a series of angry meetings where white parents vowed to resist. So the PHRC filed a formal complaint against the district, starting down a long road of litigation that culminated last week with a Commonwealth Court ruling: Pennsylvania was ordered to give the city schools more money, so they can provide equal opportunity to all their students - students who are arguably more impoverished and more segregated than they were a quarter-century ago. But the ruling by Judge Doris Smith, a full 26 years after the original complaint, won't end the controversy.
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | By Janet Paskin, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Since the beginning of September, parents, students and administrators have been debating whether to split Haddonfield High School's co-ed swim team into a boys' team and a girls' team. As the passionate debate continued Thursday night, the Haddonfield school board postponed a decision for two weeks. Some parents and swimmers are concerned that the girls on the team are being denied equal opportunity to swim. Currently the team is 68 percent female, but girls account for only 54 percent of the swimming opportunities in competition.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An assistant coach of the men's rowing team at the University of Pennsylvania has filed a reverse-discrimination complaint against the university, charging that he did not get the head coaching job on the women's crew team last year because he was not "a strong female role model. " Andrew Medcalf, 47, of Chestnut Hill, a Penn assistant coach since 1991, charged in his complaint that "Penn denied me equal opportunity to be awarded the position on the basis of my gender. " "It was almost like I was an invisible man," Medcalf said in an interview this week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2014
I'VE NEVER been a victim of domestic violence, but I've loved people who have been. I say "people" because some of the victims have been men, despite the general "Burning Bed" stereotype of the muscled brute beating the living daylights out of the 100-pound female. Violence is violence, victims are victims and abusers are abusers, regardless of gender, color, religion and affluence. This is an equal opportunity horror. I write this to point out that the sound bites we hear from a ratings-driven media do not tell the whole story about what happened between Ray and Janay Rice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By MARCUS HAYES, Daily News Staff Writer hayesm@phillynews.com
ON MOMENTOUS occasions, excited by opportunity and exhuasted by the process, principals tend to utter phrases that ring for years to come. This is where we get the gold standard of quotes; pearls with a luster that lingers for generations. Eagles head coach Chip Kelly possesses the gift of glib. Certainly, a few of his cleverer quips from Thursday's interviews are worth gilding: On the gravity of his decision to leave Oregon, and the fallout for his players, staff and bosses: "You're not just making reservations for dinner.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | BY JOANN EDWARDS
IT'S BEEN THREE years since 65 black and Hispanic children were asked not to come back to a suburban Philadelphia swim club - because of their skin color. If we've learned anything at all in Pennsylvania since then, it's this: No one should ever harm children and get away with it. It is illegal to deny someone access to a public place or service based on their skin color. Business owners can't refuse you service because they don't like your race, skin color or ethnicity. Under Pennsylvania law, if your business is open to, accepts or solicits the patronage of the general public, it is a public accommodation.
SPORTS
August 6, 2012 | By Dick Jerardi and Daily News Staff Writer
IT WAS just last January when word came down from Wisconsin that the son of Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Joe Philbin had disappeared. The next day, Michael Philbin's body was found in the Fox River in Oshkosh. He had fallen through the ice, an accidental drowning. More details emerged later, but why something tragic happens never makes up for what happens. Details of how Andy Reid's son Garrett died on Sunday may emerge later, but, just like in Wisconsin, the details won't change the finality.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
IN THE SPRING of 1967, I received my first and only Western Union telegram. It was a momentous event for me, being as I was only 5. The message was, "Congratulations on your graduation day, honey. Love, Daddy. " And it almost made up for the fact that he was missing my kindergarten commencement. At the time, I had no idea why Dad wasn't going to be in the auditorium to cheer me on. I just knew that he was "down South" (wherever that was), doing important things for work. It was only years later that I learned the full story: Ted Flowers was in Mississippi registering African-Americans to vote during one of the most volatile periods of the civil-rights movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A growing number of men are now suffering from the seductive promise that they can have it all: the comforts and rewards of a fulfilling family life, a job that brings satisfaction and a paycheck big enough to support the needs of the aforementioned family, and freedom from conflict between the demands of each. That's the conclusion of a new study by the New York-based Work and Family Institute, titled "The New Male Mystique. " The study, based on a nationally representative cross-section of working men, updates one conducted more than 30 years ago by the Department of Labor.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: What's your opinion on women who grossly out-earn their partners? I'm a raging feminist yet have difficulty with the fact that I make much more than my boyfriend. He doesn't have a college degree, so his lifetime salary ceiling is capped. If we ever buy a home together, I'll have to pay more - but he can fix almost anything. Then I shudder to think "he's earning his keep. " How do people avoid resentment? If I made $250,000, I'd care less, but I don't want to face a lifetime of struggling with bills and never feeling financially secure (especially once we have kids)
NEWS
April 4, 2011
By Ann L. Rappoport I keep a list of memorable bathrooms. This isn't all that peculiar. After all, these necessary rooms are necessary, which is why some people take the trouble to appoint them with such interesting fixtures and decor. The latest entry is in the heart of West Philly. No, it's not at the White Dog Café, which is known for labeling its water closets "Democrat" and "Republican" instead of gents and ladies. The room that caught my eye belongs to the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
What began as a startling NAACP suit accusing US Airways Group Inc. of discriminating against its African American employees at Philadelphia International Airport has ended with a settlement and a pledge by the airport's largest carrier to strengthen workplace diversity. On the matter of the monetary terms and whether the three former US Airways employees named as plaintiffs in January's federal class-action suit would get - or even want - their old jobs back, no one would say. The case before U.S. District Judge Petrese Tucker was voluntarily dismissed Friday, the same day the NAACP and US Airways issued a joint statement that the airline would continue a "strong commitment" to diversity and equal opportunity and would work with the NAACP to enhance its workplace-diversity programs at the Philadelphia airport and at Reagan National Airport in Washington.
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