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Equal Rights Amendment

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NEWS
April 1, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
CHEERING ON MOLLY YARD, president of the National Organization for Women, is Beth Whitney, a freshman at the University of Pennsylvania. Yard spoke at the university yesterday. She urged support for an April 9 women's rights march on Washington on behalf of the Equal Rights Amendment and the right to have an abortion.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The news that Bill Clinton had been elected president made Molly Yard, a longtime campaigner for women's rights and former head of the National Organization for Women, very happy. But it was the election of four women to the U.S. Senate and 19 women to the House of Representatives that made her happiest of all. Yard, who spoke Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Delaware County in Upper Providence, is 80 and still recovering from a stroke suffered last year. So she played only a limited role in the recent election campaign, speaking publicly only once, on behalf of Illinois Senate candidate Carol Mosley Braun.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
While members of Congress are riding their train to Philadelphia this morning, runners sponsored by the National Organization for Women will be finishing up their own trip from Washington - the long, hard way. A chain of one-mile relays is expected to arrive at JFK Plaza about noon today, then wind its way down to Independence Mall to mark the opening of NOW's annual conference, being held this year in Philadelphia. At 10 a.m. Monday, U.S. Rep. Claudine Schneider, R-R.I., and Olympic swimming gold medalist Nancy Hogshead ran the first mile from the U.S. Capitol.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
If Alice Paul, the New Jersey suffragist who led the fight to get women the vote, had witnessed Hillary Clinton's becoming the first female presidential candidate of a major party, she likely would have celebrated briefly and then gone back to work. That's according to the women who have studied Paul and run the Alice Paul Institute in Mount Laurel. "She would say, 'Now we need to keep working,' " Terri O'Connell, a spokeswoman for the organization, said Friday, a day after watching history being made with fellow feminists and activists in Center City.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
President Obama on Tuesday designated the former headquarters of the National Woman's Party, founded by Mount Laurel native Alice Paul in 1917, as a national monument. The three-story brick house in Washington will be renamed the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument in honor of Paul and Alva Belmont, a suffragist and benefactor whose donations helped the party purchase the building in 1929. Obama took the action on "Equal Pay Day," which marks the length of time women must work into a new year to make the same amount on average that men made in the previous year.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | BY CAL THOMAS
"Take our rights, lose your jobs" is the slogan abortion rights advocates will use against state legislators who vote to restrict or outlaw abortion. How seriously should that threat be taken? Not very, if past experience is any indication. During the 10 years the Equal Rights Amendment sought ratification by the states, it was enthusiastically supported by the administrations of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter (who personally lobbied members of the Illinois legislature), most of the press and more than 450 national organizations.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
About 20 people formed a circle lit by candlelight Tuesday in the cemetery of the Westfield Friends Meeting. They stood by the grave of suffragist Alice Paul, who is buried in a small plot marked by an unadorned white marble marker. Although the mood was somber, they were not trying to conjure her spirit. They were there to mark the 1917 Night of Terror. In January that year, female demonstrators had started holding round-the-clock vigils outside Woodrow Wilson's White House, demanding the vote for women.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a compelling moment during the confirmation hearings of Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a pioneer in the women's rights movement. She was pressed by Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., about why the Equal Rights Amendment was still needed, since there are laws that protect women from discrimination. "Every modern human-rights document has a statement that men and women are equal before the law," she said. "Our Constitution doesn't. I would like to see, for the sake of my daughter and my granddaughter and . . . all the daughters who come after, that statement as part of our fundamental instrument of government.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Washington got one. So did Andrew Jackson, the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, and Neil Armstrong. But 161 years would pass before the Congress of the United States awarded its Gold Medal to a woman. Now, says U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan (R., N.J.), it's time for Congress to posthumously accord its highest civilian honor to Alice Paul - the unyielding civil rights advocate from Mount Laurel credited with passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
THE HEARTBREAKING and alarming news that one in five high school students is involved with either DHS or the juvenile justice system should be a wake-up call for systemic change. Even though we should never abandon these students or give up hope, the intervention that has the best chance of saving them must happen as early as possible. Blaming their dysfunctional homes as an excuse not to fund early intervention programs only exacerbates the problem. Meanwhile, many teachers apply for positions in urban schools at all levels for the purpose of making a difference.
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NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
If Alice Paul, the New Jersey suffragist who led the fight to get women the vote, had witnessed Hillary Clinton's becoming the first female presidential candidate of a major party, she likely would have celebrated briefly and then gone back to work. That's according to the women who have studied Paul and run the Alice Paul Institute in Mount Laurel. "She would say, 'Now we need to keep working,' " Terri O'Connell, a spokeswoman for the organization, said Friday, a day after watching history being made with fellow feminists and activists in Center City.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lillian Ciarrochi, 85, of Philadelphia, a feminist who campaigned to improve the lives of women both here and nationwide, died Wednesday, April 13, of an aneurysm at her Center City home. Eleanor Smeal, the former president of the National Organization for Women, called Ms. Ciarrochi "a real jewel, a lover of action, a fighter, a strong friend, and an indefatigable feminist who worked constantly for women's rights. " "She did whatever needed to be done and never looked at any clocks.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
President Obama on Tuesday designated the former headquarters of the National Woman's Party, founded by Mount Laurel native Alice Paul in 1917, as a national monument. The three-story brick house in Washington will be renamed the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument in honor of Paul and Alva Belmont, a suffragist and benefactor whose donations helped the party purchase the building in 1929. Obama took the action on "Equal Pay Day," which marks the length of time women must work into a new year to make the same amount on average that men made in the previous year.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
In June 1909, Alice Paul sent a letter to her mother from London. "Dear Mamma. . . I have joined the 'suffragettes' - the militant party of the women's suffrage question," it began. About six months later, a New York Times report said that Paul's screams were heard "resounding through the prison" in London when painful force-feedings were implemented to stop a hunger strike by the suffragettes. Paul mailed another message to her childhood home in Mount Laurel and addressed it to her mother, Tacie: "I am sorry thee was so worried..
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The suffragette Alice Paul was honored Monday with a whimsical Google Doodle and at her birthplace in Mount Laurel, where a congressman spoke of his efforts to have a posthumous Congressional Gold Medal awarded to her for her contributions to women's equality. The Doodle, the central image on Google's search page, marked Paul's 131st birthday and linked to stories about Paul's lifelong dedication to passage of the 19th Amendment and the proposed Equal Rights Amendment. In the Doodle, Paul holds an umbrella and a sign that says "Deeds Not Words," a nod to her activism and willingness to go to jail to effect change.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
THE HEARTBREAKING and alarming news that one in five high school students is involved with either DHS or the juvenile justice system should be a wake-up call for systemic change. Even though we should never abandon these students or give up hope, the intervention that has the best chance of saving them must happen as early as possible. Blaming their dysfunctional homes as an excuse not to fund early intervention programs only exacerbates the problem. Meanwhile, many teachers apply for positions in urban schools at all levels for the purpose of making a difference.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Early help to thwart violence "Shame on us if we've forgotten" the victims of Newtown and other mass shootings, President Obama said last week. But the real shame is failing to face the elephant in the room: mental health. Several decades ago, civil rights activists' court challenges narrowed the government's ability to give a person help with psychological issues without his consent. Today, troubled individuals have to commit a crime before this can happen. While the 500-plus annual murders in Obama's adopted hometown of Chicago do not happen because of mental disorders, mass murders like those at Sandy Hook Elementary all have a mental-health component.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Washington got one. So did Andrew Jackson, the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, and Neil Armstrong. But 161 years would pass before the Congress of the United States awarded its Gold Medal to a woman. Now, says U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan (R., N.J.), it's time for Congress to posthumously accord its highest civilian honor to Alice Paul - the unyielding civil rights advocate from Mount Laurel credited with passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
ON MONDAY, President Obama hailed the pioneers who in 1848 first fought for women's rights at Seneca Falls, N.Y. On Wednesday, Obama's Pentagon sent America's female troops charging up Hamburger Hill, metaphorically speaking. Leon Panetta, the outgoing defense secretary, has decided that for the first time U.S. women troops will be eligible for front-line combat infantry or artillery jobs that have long been restricted to men - first by tradition and after 1994 by official Pentagon policy, according to multiple news accounts.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
About 20 people formed a circle lit by candlelight Tuesday in the cemetery of the Westfield Friends Meeting. They stood by the grave of suffragist Alice Paul, who is buried in a small plot marked by an unadorned white marble marker. Although the mood was somber, they were not trying to conjure her spirit. They were there to mark the 1917 Night of Terror. In January that year, female demonstrators had started holding round-the-clock vigils outside Woodrow Wilson's White House, demanding the vote for women.
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