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Equal Treatment

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NEWS
March 31, 2016
ISSUE | GENDER EQUALITY Women deserve credit throughout history My praise to the Inquirer for its March 20 commentaries about Lucretia Coffin Mott, a 19th-century Philadelphia abolitionist, women's rights advocate, minister, and homemaker ("A worthy substitute for Hamilton"), and about America's tradition of ignoring women's contributions ("In the name of fairness, don't erase women's history"). Including women's achievements in our everyday writing and teaching of history, instead of artificially designating the 31 days of March as something called Women's History Month, would be a sensible step toward the equality so many of us seek.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Braulio Montalvo, 80, formerly of Lafayette Hill, a pioneering family therapist who did much of his work at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, died Monday, March 31, of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was raised in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and lived in Fort Lee, N.J.; Mount Airy; and the Philadelphia suburbs before moving to Albuquerque in 1985 to care for his aging mother. Although he had dreams of becoming a cartoonist or a sculptor, the intuitive Mr. Montalvo gravitated toward the field of family therapy.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
A Pennsylvania judge rejected a bid Friday from gas drillers and legislators to intervene in a legal challenge to the state's recently passed gas-drilling law. Senior Commonwealth Court Judge Keith Quigley ruled that both the industry and the legislators were already being adequately represented by the state attorney general and by documents pertaining to the passage of Act 13. The law, signed by Gov. Corbett in February, was enacted to...
NEWS
April 24, 1998
For Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua and many Protestant ministers who strongly oppose the "life partners" legislation before City Council, it is a moral issue. For Episcopal Bishop Charles E. Bennison Jr. and for other Protestant and Jewish clergy, it's also a moral issue - but they support the three bills. The legislation, which Council will vote on in two weeks, would allow gay and lesbian partners of city employees to qualify for medical benefits, exempt gay and lesbian couples from the real estate transfer tax, as married couples are, and allow city employees to designate anyone, regardless of relationship, to receive their pension benefits.
NEWS
June 24, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lower Merion School District did not break the law when it imposed a redistricting plan taking away the right of nine South Ardmore students to choose a high school, a federal judge ruled Thursday. U.S. District Court Judge Michael M. Baylson issued a 31-page decision just after 2 p.m. from the federal courthouse in Center City. It was sent to reporters via e-mail. Baylson's opinion said the school district took into account other factors as well as race when it crafted a controversial redistricting plan for its two high schools.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AN ISLAMIC advocacy organization is suing a Bucks County township for discrimination after the town's zoning board rejected an application to erect a mosque. According to the lawsuit filed yesterday by CAIR-Philadelphia in federal court, Bensalem Township is demonstrating "burdensome, discriminatory and unreasonable land use regulations" by blocking local Muslims' ability to build a mosque. The proposed Islamic worship site would be the first in the suburban town just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
FIRST, THE good news: Mayor Street has given Philadelphia Gas Works a reprieve and will quit strong-arming the utility for an annual $18 million. PGW has had to borrow the money in the past, making its billion-dollar debt load even worse. Street, in the past, has counted on the money to help the city's budget. Now, he has informed city council that he's suspending the money grab for five years. Just as helpful is his decision to give PGW more time to repay a $45 million loan advanced by the city.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
YES, Abe Krieger, we "liberals" are trying to sink you. We liberals want fair pricing for medication where the consumer AND the company benefit. We liberals want EQUAL treatment under the law, not whoever spends the most money wins. We liberals would like quality health care for all. Remember, the new Iraqi constitution ensures health care for all, at U.S. taxpayer expense. That means the person working two jobs, paying taxes, with no health care, is paying for an Iraqi citizen to get medical treatment and medication that is unavailable to her. Isn't it amazing that the icon of conservatism, Rush Limbaugh, who rails constantly about that "liberal" organization, the ACLU, is receiving help from them in response to his drug trial?
NEWS
March 24, 1986
Joseph C. Mihalich, in his March 3 Op-ed Page article requesting equal treatment for athletes relative to drug testing, is way off base trying to equate treatment of athletes with carpenters, doctors, lawyers, etc. Athletes can never be treated the same as ordinary people unless newspapers had carpenters sections, doctors sections, lawyer sections as well as sports sections so that the names of carpenters, doctors, lawyers, etc., become common...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 31, 2016
ISSUE | GENDER EQUALITY Women deserve credit throughout history My praise to the Inquirer for its March 20 commentaries about Lucretia Coffin Mott, a 19th-century Philadelphia abolitionist, women's rights advocate, minister, and homemaker ("A worthy substitute for Hamilton"), and about America's tradition of ignoring women's contributions ("In the name of fairness, don't erase women's history"). Including women's achievements in our everyday writing and teaching of history, instead of artificially designating the 31 days of March as something called Women's History Month, would be a sensible step toward the equality so many of us seek.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Mikal has definite plans for his future. The 19-year-old has set goals for himself and is strongly motivated to work toward attaining them. He would like to obtain a college degree and then pursue a career in the arts and entertainment field. His many interests include cosmetology and fashion design. Another goal for Mikal is to be an advocate for equal treatment of LGBTQ youth. "What's important to me now is just to know before I go to bed at night is that I have reached and helped as many people that I can during the day," he says.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AN ISLAMIC advocacy organization is suing a Bucks County township for discrimination after the town's zoning board rejected an application to erect a mosque. According to the lawsuit filed yesterday by CAIR-Philadelphia in federal court, Bensalem Township is demonstrating "burdensome, discriminatory and unreasonable land use regulations" by blocking local Muslims' ability to build a mosque. The proposed Islamic worship site would be the first in the suburban town just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Braulio Montalvo, 80, formerly of Lafayette Hill, a pioneering family therapist who did much of his work at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, died Monday, March 31, of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was raised in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and lived in Fort Lee, N.J.; Mount Airy; and the Philadelphia suburbs before moving to Albuquerque in 1985 to care for his aging mother. Although he had dreams of becoming a cartoonist or a sculptor, the intuitive Mr. Montalvo gravitated toward the field of family therapy.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
I was invited to my first same-sex nuptials almost 25 years ago - the bad old days when AIDS was laying waste to the little ghetto gay people inhabited at the semi-fashionable margins. The wedding day was sunny, the setting fabulous, but one groom's family was dramatically absent, and amid the uttering of earnest niceties and the raising of glasses, I got angry. I remember thinking, why are they putting on this show? It isn't real, they're not getting married. They can't get married.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Andrew MacAskill and Rajesh Kumaar Singh, BLOOMBERG
Five of the six men accused of the rape and fatal beating of a woman on a bus in New Delhi will appear at a city court Monday, government prosecutor Rajiv Mohan said. The five, all over 18, will be tried on rape, murder, and other charges, Mohan said in a phone interview Sunday. The sixth accused, a juvenile, will be presented before a separate judicial panel, he said. The police have submitted evidence including DNA test results of the accused to the court, he said. The assault on the woman and her male friend, which led to her death almost two weeks later, has triggered nationwide protests and forced the government to address demands for swifter justice, safer streets, and heavier sentences in rape cases.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
A Pennsylvania judge rejected a bid Friday from gas drillers and legislators to intervene in a legal challenge to the state's recently passed gas-drilling law. Senior Commonwealth Court Judge Keith Quigley ruled that both the industry and the legislators were already being adequately represented by the state attorney general and by documents pertaining to the passage of Act 13. The law, signed by Gov. Corbett in February, was enacted to...
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
NBC10 plans to provide an hour's worth of programming to the Republican candidate for mayor, Karen Brown, settling a dispute that led Brown to file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission earlier this week. The television station announced Thursday it would air a special half-hour edition of its @Issue show from 7 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, with Brown taking questions from host Steve Highsmith and NBC10 viewers. The Q & A program will be extended another half-hour, to 8 p.m., on the station's website, NBC Philadelphia Nonstop.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Wharton Esherick, who died in 1970 two months shy of his 83d birthday, was one of the Philadelphia region's most innovative and influential artists, yet his work hasn't received as much public attention locally as his legacy warrants. Esherick began his career as a painter and printmaker - his last significant solo exhibition appears to have been one of prints at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Art Museum in 1984 - but he's remembered primarily for his striking modernist furniture and his transformative architectural interiors.
NEWS
June 25, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal court judge in Philadelphia ruled Thursday that the Lower Merion School District broke no law when it imposed a redistricting plan that deprived nine South Ardmore students of their choice of high school. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson said school officials used race as part of a cornucopia of factors to pick the students' diverse neighborhood as a site for busing to the smaller of the district's two new high schools. By taking other factors into consideration - the need for two equal high schools, educational continuity, and limiting travel time - district officials imbued the plan with "race-neutral" interests, Baylson wrote in the 31-page decision.
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