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BUSINESS
December 29, 2007 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. will pay the beneficiaries of 87-year-old founder Ralph Roberts his base salary for five years after he dies, according to a compensation agreement filed yesterday with regulators. If he is suddenly disabled and can't work, the company also will pay Roberts for five years. The company did not disclose Roberts' 2007 base salary but in 2006 he earned $1.8 million. Roberts founded cable giant Comcast in 1969 and is chairman of the board's executive and finance committee.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economy was not so hot, but last year was good for a lot of CEOs. The 100 best-paid chief executive officers at firms with a large presence in the Philadelphia region took home a combined $746 million in 2010. That was about the size of Zimbabwe's projected budget deficit this year. Or almost the cost of the huge new expansion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Each of the last three Shrek movies earned about the same. The CEOs' combined earnings could have paid the wages of 15,283 workers at the median 2010 income in the Philadelphia region.The top 100 CEOs here had a median pay of $5.8 million - half earned less, half earned more.
NEWS
June 26, 2008 | By Don Steinberg, FOR THE INQUIRER
The most dramatic recent critique of runaway CEO pay came in March on national TV. Gadfly U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman hauled in chief executive officers of three troubled financial companies and scolded them for taking millions as their companies lost billions. "How can a few execs do so well when their companies are doing so poorly?" the California Democrat asked as cameras rolled. Angelo Mozilo, CEO of Countrywide Financial Corp.; Charles Prince, former CEO of Citigroup Inc.; and E. Stanley O'Neal, former CEO at Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc., said multimillion-dollar pay (or exit)
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It's no surprise to find that Comcast Corp.'s Brian Roberts was the top-paid chief executive last year on the Philly 50 list of the region's most valuable publicly traded companies. Comcast, the nation's biggest cable TV firm and the most valuable company here, with a market value of $114 billion, paid Roberts $25 million. The total included $11.8 million in cash, $9.6 million in stock-based pay, and $3.7 million in other compensation, according to data from Equilar, a compensation-data firm.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2005 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the face of it, Philadelphia's top female executives would appear to have reached pay parity with their male counterparts, with average annual compensation about $1.8 million. But that ignores the Carol factor. The $37.7 million compensation last year of Carol A. Ammon, chief executive officer of Endo Pharmaceuticals Holdings Inc., so throws off the average that what looks like parity is anything but. According to data compiled by Equilar Inc. for The Inquirer, the average draw of the region's top female executives dropped to $1.1 million when Ammon's pay was removed from the calculation.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol A. Ammon, 55, a former lab technician who made millions of dollars from a pharmaceutical company she started nine years ago, earned the highest pay among Philadelphia's top executives in 2005. Ammon, chairwoman of Endo Pharmaceuticals Holdings Inc., is the first woman to top the list since The Inquirer started tracking local executive pay in 1994. Not only that, but Ammon was among the most highly paid executives in the nation, judging from a list published by Forbes magazine.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian L. Roberts, Comcast Corp.'s chairman, chief executive officer and president, topped the executive-compensation chart, earning $27.5 million in 2006 - more than any other executive of any company with a major presence in the region. And his compensation reflects a trend in executive pay that is local - different from the national standard, according to Alexander Cwirko-Godycki, a research manager at Equilar Inc., the California-based executive-compensation firm that examined Philadelphia-area companies for The Inquirer.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Savage cannot find any fault with chief executive officer John G. Drosdick's leadership at Sunoco Inc. "I think that Jack probably saved our company," said Savage, who, as president of Sunoco's council of unions, represents about 1,800 workers. "He's certainly been a more effective CEO than the man he replaced," Savage said. "All you have to do is look at the performance of the refinery. " Profit for the oil company climbed 61 percent to $974 million, and the stock price doubled in 2005.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is good to be the king. Or queen. How good? Well, Brian L. Roberts earned $25,087,379 in compensation last year as president and chairman of Comcast Corp., according to Equilar, which conducted a survey for The Inquirer of executive compensation at publicly traded area companies. (His compensation was tied to Comcast's stock performance, which rose about 60 percent in 2012.) That figure put Roberts at the top of the heap, locally, and is about 294 times the $85,000 median salary of all Comcast employees, according to the website SalaryList, which says it derived that median figure from government and company reports.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2005 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Business was booming last year at Toll Bros. Inc., and chief executive officer Robert I. Toll was well-rewarded for that success. The Horsham-based home builder's revenue and net income soared, and so did its stock price. And Robert Toll's total compensation - $44 million, more than double his take in 2003 - was the highest among executives of local companies, according to data compiled for The Inquirer by Equilar Inc. It was not quite as good a year at Merck & Co. Inc. Net income at the pharmaceutical firm that employs 12,000 in Montgomery County was down 15 percent, and the company's stock price fell 30 percent amid withdrawal from the market of the blockbuster pain medicine Vioxx.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is good to be the king. Or queen. How good? Well, Brian L. Roberts earned $25,087,379 in compensation last year as president and chairman of Comcast Corp., according to Equilar, which conducted a survey for The Inquirer of executive compensation at publicly traded area companies. (His compensation was tied to Comcast's stock performance, which rose about 60 percent in 2012.) That figure put Roberts at the top of the heap, locally, and is about 294 times the $85,000 median salary of all Comcast employees, according to the website SalaryList, which says it derived that median figure from government and company reports.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It's no surprise to find that Comcast Corp.'s Brian Roberts was the top-paid chief executive last year on the Philly 50 list of the region's most valuable publicly traded companies. Comcast, the nation's biggest cable TV firm and the most valuable company here, with a market value of $114 billion, paid Roberts $25 million. The total included $11.8 million in cash, $9.6 million in stock-based pay, and $3.7 million in other compensation, according to data from Equilar, a compensation-data firm.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Maria Panaritis, NQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Data about the high-flying pay of U.S. executives are pouring in, and the evidence is stacking up against those who argue that the munificent sums are for magnificent performance at the top. If anything, the findings of two detailed studies over the last 18 months raise questions and intensify a growing sense that the justifications for exorbitant CEO pay are downright nonsensical. Generous executive compensation packages have taken hold since the 1970s in ways unseen in prior generations.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economy was not so hot, but last year was good for a lot of CEOs. The 100 best-paid chief executive officers at firms with a large presence in the Philadelphia region took home a combined $746 million in 2010. That was about the size of Zimbabwe's projected budget deficit this year. Or almost the cost of the huge new expansion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Each of the last three Shrek movies earned about the same. The CEOs' combined earnings could have paid the wages of 15,283 workers at the median 2010 income in the Philadelphia region.The top 100 CEOs here had a median pay of $5.8 million - half earned less, half earned more.
NEWS
June 24, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Decades ago, when most of Philadelphia's largest companies had their headquarters here, the region's highest-paid executives were also neighbors, working on area boards and coaching their children's sports teams, as Comcast chief executive Brian Roberts once did in Chestnut Hill. These days, major companies have big operations here, but their headquarters and chief executives often are elsewhere, from Connecticut to Denver. For the most part, their personal involvement in the region is minor, especially when it comes to discussing their compensation.
NEWS
June 26, 2008 | By Don Steinberg, FOR THE INQUIRER
The most dramatic recent critique of runaway CEO pay came in March on national TV. Gadfly U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman hauled in chief executive officers of three troubled financial companies and scolded them for taking millions as their companies lost billions. "How can a few execs do so well when their companies are doing so poorly?" the California Democrat asked as cameras rolled. Angelo Mozilo, CEO of Countrywide Financial Corp.; Charles Prince, former CEO of Citigroup Inc.; and E. Stanley O'Neal, former CEO at Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc., said multimillion-dollar pay (or exit)
BUSINESS
December 29, 2007 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. will pay the beneficiaries of 87-year-old founder Ralph Roberts his base salary for five years after he dies, according to a compensation agreement filed yesterday with regulators. If he is suddenly disabled and can't work, the company also will pay Roberts for five years. The company did not disclose Roberts' 2007 base salary but in 2006 he earned $1.8 million. Roberts founded cable giant Comcast in 1969 and is chairman of the board's executive and finance committee.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian L. Roberts, Comcast Corp.'s chairman, chief executive officer and president, topped the executive-compensation chart, earning $27.5 million in 2006 - more than any other executive of any company with a major presence in the region. And his compensation reflects a trend in executive pay that is local - different from the national standard, according to Alexander Cwirko-Godycki, a research manager at Equilar Inc., the California-based executive-compensation firm that examined Philadelphia-area companies for The Inquirer.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Savage cannot find any fault with chief executive officer John G. Drosdick's leadership at Sunoco Inc. "I think that Jack probably saved our company," said Savage, who, as president of Sunoco's council of unions, represents about 1,800 workers. "He's certainly been a more effective CEO than the man he replaced," Savage said. "All you have to do is look at the performance of the refinery. " Profit for the oil company climbed 61 percent to $974 million, and the stock price doubled in 2005.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol A. Ammon, 55, a former lab technician who made millions of dollars from a pharmaceutical company she started nine years ago, earned the highest pay among Philadelphia's top executives in 2005. Ammon, chairwoman of Endo Pharmaceuticals Holdings Inc., is the first woman to top the list since The Inquirer started tracking local executive pay in 1994. Not only that, but Ammon was among the most highly paid executives in the nation, judging from a list published by Forbes magazine.
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