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Equipment Operator

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NEWS
June 11, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NOW, SEAN BENSCHOP will know what it feels like to be trapped. Benschop, who was the operator of the excavator at the site of Wednesday's Market Street building collapse, was denied bail by a judge yesterday after turning himself in on Saturday to face a litany of felony charges related to the disaster that killed six and injured 14. Benschop, of 7th Street near Ruscomb in Olney, was arraigned early yesterday morning on six counts of involuntary manslaughter,...
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
AMBULANCE LEAVES SUN OIL REFINERY in South Philadelphia yesterday where a crude oil vapor leak exploded, starting a fire that burned three workers. The vapor cloud ignited shortly before 8 a,n, at the refinery at 3143 W. Passyunk Ave., fire officials said, and was not declared under control for nearly two hours. A 38-year-old man was in St. Agnes Burn Center in serious condition last night, and another worker was in Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with burns on his back and neck.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Harry E. Hill, 57, of Phoenixville, captain of the Greater Overbrook String Band from 1991 to 1996 and from 2000 to 2001, died of lung cancer on Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Seasons Hospice at Phoenixville Hospital. Born in Norristown, Mr. Hill graduated from Bishop Kenrick High School there in 1972 and had worked as an equipment operator for PennDot in Chester County since 2004. In the 1980s and 1990s, he drove a milk delivery truck for what is now Clover Farms in Reading.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Call it the Great South Philadelphia Rock Salt Caper. Two nights ago, someone with a front-end loader stole about 200 tons of rock salt from a railyard near Oregon Avenue, police said. Dozens of people with trucks visited the yard and paid the equipment operator as little as $10 a load, other sources said. The salt reportedly had been earmarked for PennDOT road crews. But throughout the night, drivers pulled up to the pile, forked over some cash and loaded up on black-market salt.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
It almost seemed to James Sutton that he and Earl Stout were fated to be on opposite sides of the political coin. Even when they set out to be together, they were out of sync. In 1974, Sutton ran for financial secretary of the city's sanitation workers' union, where both he and Stout had come of age. "I ran with the then-Earl Stout slate," Sutton, 54, recalled yesterday. "He was the business manager then. The whole slate won but me. " Last night, the two men emerged from a bitter election farther apart than ever when Sutton defeated Stout for the presidency of District Council 33 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the city's 13,000-member blue-collar union.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Think of hiring at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission as an escalator: when one politically-connected employee steps up, another one is likely to step on. Deborah J. Eckert, who just happens to be dating the highest ranking Republican in the state Senate, recently got a promotion. Yesterday, the commission approved the hiring of Patricia L. Bodack, who just happens to be the daughter of Allegheny County Sen. Leonard J. Bodack, the second-highest-ranking Democrat in the Senate.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
A year after six people shopping and working in a Philadelphia thrift store died in what has been aptly described as a "Third World-style tragedy," some lasting good has started to emerge from the destruction of the Center City building collapse. Last year, when the site at 22d and Market Streets began to go the way of all too many Philadelphia properties - that is, toward trash-strewn neglect or perhaps parking lot duty - the parents of one victim began advocating a more fitting use. The admirable efforts of Nancy Winkler and Jay Bryan - the parents of Anne Bryan, a 24-year-old art student who died in the collapse - got a significant boost from the Salvation Army's generous agreement to donate its small piece of the property to the city for use as a memorial park.
NEWS
May 31, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the spring and fall, when the vegetation isn't too thick, Dick Powell leaves his Westampton home for a secret "dig" site about a mile and a half away on Woodlane Road. There he sinks a potato drag into a farmer's old trash dump. A few inches down, he finds the treasure he is looking for - discarded milk bottles about 50 years old. "I've gotten about four or five bottles out there, and I know there's a lot more. I don't want anybody finding about this place," Powell said, as if he didn't already have enough milk bottles.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By James Osborne, Marcia Gelbart, and Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulations for the type of aerial lift that toppled into a busy Center City intersection Monday say the machine should not be moved while the arm is extended and people are inside the basket. Police and witnesses say that's exactly what the lift operator did while performing a survey of the stone exterior of First Presbyterian Church. As he moved the machine from his perch 125 feet above the pavement, one of the lift's wheels rolled onto a sidewalk utility panel, which gave way under the weight.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Surrounded by five-pound bags of cornmeal and flour, jars of peanut butter and cans of corn and beans, Chuck Kline took his place in the human assembly line at the Bristol Borough firehouse. The Croydon resident quickly stuffed the cans, bricks of butter and other surplus food items into plastic bags, as he watched the line of people snake outside the building and spill onto the sidewalk of the municipal complex. "These are tough times," Kline said, shaking his head. "I'm just glad I could help out. " Kline was one of several volunteers, mostly senior citizens, who helped hand out more than 15,000 pounds of surplus food to borough residents on Tuesday.
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NEWS
June 6, 2014
A year after six people shopping and working in a Philadelphia thrift store died in what has been aptly described as a "Third World-style tragedy," some lasting good has started to emerge from the destruction of the Center City building collapse. Last year, when the site at 22d and Market Streets began to go the way of all too many Philadelphia properties - that is, toward trash-strewn neglect or perhaps parking lot duty - the parents of one victim began advocating a more fitting use. The admirable efforts of Nancy Winkler and Jay Bryan - the parents of Anne Bryan, a 24-year-old art student who died in the collapse - got a significant boost from the Salvation Army's generous agreement to donate its small piece of the property to the city for use as a memorial park.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Cianchetti, 58, of Gloucester City, supervisor of public works there, died of complications from cancer Tuesday, Nov. 12, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Cianchetti, known as "Spags," helped develop a shared-services agreement with Audubon, Bellmawr, Brooklawn, Collingswood, and Mount Ephraim that became official in 2010, Gloucester City administrator Jack Lipsett said. Prior to that, Lipsett said, the communities would informally help one another. "For instance," Lipsett said, "Bellmawr doesn't have a bucket truck which hangs banners and things, and we would share our vehicle.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Fall-guy for collapse higher-ups? The recent building collapse revealed a series of flaws in the city's review and approval process for the demolition of buildings. No one disputes the fact that the deaths of six and the injury of others were a completely preventable event. But we now face a possible second failure as our judicial system decides who face with criminal charges related to the tragedy. The person who represents the lowest and least powerful link in the chain of responsibility has been charged with manslaughter, but clearly criminal charges must not stop with the equipment operator if Philadelphia is to avoid another tragedy.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NOW, SEAN BENSCHOP will know what it feels like to be trapped. Benschop, who was the operator of the excavator at the site of Wednesday's Market Street building collapse, was denied bail by a judge yesterday after turning himself in on Saturday to face a litany of felony charges related to the disaster that killed six and injured 14. Benschop, of 7th Street near Ruscomb in Olney, was arraigned early yesterday morning on six counts of involuntary manslaughter,...
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Harry E. Hill, 57, of Phoenixville, captain of the Greater Overbrook String Band from 1991 to 1996 and from 2000 to 2001, died of lung cancer on Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Seasons Hospice at Phoenixville Hospital. Born in Norristown, Mr. Hill graduated from Bishop Kenrick High School there in 1972 and had worked as an equipment operator for PennDot in Chester County since 2004. In the 1980s and 1990s, he drove a milk delivery truck for what is now Clover Farms in Reading.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By James Osborne, Marcia Gelbart, and Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulations for the type of aerial lift that toppled into a busy Center City intersection Monday say the machine should not be moved while the arm is extended and people are inside the basket. Police and witnesses say that's exactly what the lift operator did while performing a survey of the stone exterior of First Presbyterian Church. As he moved the machine from his perch 125 feet above the pavement, one of the lift's wheels rolled onto a sidewalk utility panel, which gave way under the weight.
NEWS
May 31, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the spring and fall, when the vegetation isn't too thick, Dick Powell leaves his Westampton home for a secret "dig" site about a mile and a half away on Woodlane Road. There he sinks a potato drag into a farmer's old trash dump. A few inches down, he finds the treasure he is looking for - discarded milk bottles about 50 years old. "I've gotten about four or five bottles out there, and I know there's a lot more. I don't want anybody finding about this place," Powell said, as if he didn't already have enough milk bottles.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where is Christopher Horton? The Honey Brook Township man, a heavy-equipment operator for a local contractor, has been missing since Feb. 22, when he failed to pick up two coworkers for a ride to a job site. Horton's mother, Nancy Horton, and his boss, Jim Finn, both also of Honey Brook, described Horton yesterday as sober and responsible and said they and other family and friends were at a loss to explain the disappearance. "We have no clue. This is very unlike the boy. He always tells somebody what he's doing," Nancy Horton said.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Michael H. Stehlik, 44, of Ivyland, a heavy-equipment operator who loved motorcycles, died Sunday of severe trauma suffered in a motorcycle accident in Northampton Township. Northampton police said Mr. Stehlik was riding his 2001 Harley-Davidson Sportster south on Second Street Pike, south of Tapeworm Drive, at 3:50 p.m. when the cycle crossed the northbound lane on a curve and went down an embankment. Mr. Stehlik was born in Abington, graduated from Archbishop Wood High School in 1974, and attended Bucks County Community College.
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