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Equus

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NEWS
November 14, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Before he became the master of the horses in the Mum Puppettheatre's new staging of Equus, choreographer Robert Smythe visited this year's Edinburgh Festival and chanced upon a production that showed him the dimensions of his problem and a possible solution. A local high school put on a street presentation of Peter Shaffer's landmark drama and played out the equine imagery with actors in elaborate horse masks. It is the traditional, safe way and one that adheres to Shaffer's careful and detailed instructions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the Mum Puppettheatre announced plans to mount Equus, the dubious may have entertained visions of marionette mares and puppet palominos. But the effective, persuasively acted in-the-round production directed by William Roudebush is, in more than one sense, very human. Indeed, one of its strongest elements is the realization of the governing equine metaphor by five performers (minus the usual wire masks and steel shoes) from the Dell'Arte School of Physical Theater. Their concisely calibrated movements evoke the power, grace and movement of horses.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Let's get right down to it, the question people are asking: The answer is, yes, in Equus Daniel Radcliffe is very good-looking in the buff. You normally don't see big stars without a thread, so the play's Act 2 nude scene is a Broadway curiosity. But Radcliffe's no longer a child hanging around Hogwarts. He's 19, he's obviously been working out, and he's hugely talented in his first live stage role, even with clothes on. I should be so lucky. If I were, I'd get to play on Broadway opposite sweet, alluring Anna Camp, who is also jaybirding on stage - and she, who appeared in Mike Nichols' production of The Country Girl last season, looks great.
NEWS
September 25, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - Let's get right down to it, the question people are asking: The answer is, yes, in Equus , Daniel Radcliffe is very good-looking in the buff. You normally don't see big stars without a thread, so the play's Act 2 nude scene is a Broadway curiosity. But Radcliffe's no longer a child hanging around Hogwarts. He's 19, he's obviously been working out, and he's hugely talented in his first live stage role, even with clothes on. I should be so lucky. If I were, I'd get to play on Broadway opposite sweet, alluring Anna Camp, who is also jaybirding on stage - and she, who appeared in Mike Nichols' production of The Country Girl last season, looks great.
NEWS
October 8, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The revival of Equus by Mum Puppettheatre trotted away with five awards last night, edging out the musical Baby Case with four to become the most recognized production at the annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre ceremony. The production of Peter Shaffer's 1973 psychological drama about a disturbed boy who blinded horses, and the Arden Theatre Company's production of the new musical about the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby won the awards for overall production of a play and musical.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With the premiere of its new musical, Baby Case, receiving more citations than any other show, the Arden Theatre Company led area theaters with 16 nominations in the annual competition for the Barrymore Awards for Theatrical Excellence. Baby Case was cited 11 times at the announcement of the nominations yesterday in the Arden's F. Otto Haas Theatre, the same venue where the musical based on the 1932 kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby was staged. In all, 38 productions by 32 area theaters during the 2001-02 season received nominations for the eighth annual Barrymore Awards, which will be announced Oct. 7 at a ceremony in the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
If you're looking to impress the Joneses next door, Hyundai's new top-of-the-line luxury sedan, the Equus, may disappoint. Oh, Hyundai has concealed its brand well enough to evade immediate detection. But, sooner or later, inquiring Joneses will want to know. And you'll have to reveal that, yes, it is a Hyundai - and you'll have to admit you spent about $60,000 on a Hyundai. But if you are more interested in impressing yourself, the outlook gets much brighter. The Equus is beautifully styled and has a spacious, luxury-laden interior and a cushy ride.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In his 1973 play Equus , Peter Shaffer tells a detective story, based on an actual event, about a reluctant psychiatrist attempting to unravel the case of a 17-year-old boy who blinded six horses. The play's confrontation of religion with psychiatry helped set the tone for pop culture's understanding of mind and behavior. Forty years later, books by Oliver Sacks, shows on NPR, and hit TV shows and movies ( The Silence of the Lambs , Criminal Minds ) have fleshed out the genre and broadened popular knowledge of aberrant psychology.
NEWS
October 29, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A theater director is, in the broad sense of the word, an artist. But when William Roudebush describes how he approaches directing, he sounds like an artist in its narrower definition of painter. His purpose, he says, is to bring out "the colors and hues the actors and technicians are capable of, to allow a painting to form in front of me - and be surprised, or dismayed, by how it turns out. " Roudebush's latest opportunity to surprise or displease himself is on view at Mum Puppettheatre, where his revival of The Madwoman of Chaillot will open tomorrow after a series of previews.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Don Danson was a Boy Scout at St. Joachim's parish when the acting bug bit. His troop had just performed a 15-minute skit for their parents. Danson played a mad scientist. "I heard the applause and I was hooked," Danson said. More than 30 years later, the applause still echoes, and Danson wants to bring the glory of theater to Frankford in a big way: he and his wife, Rebecca Hayes, want to establish a non-profit community theater and playhouse. "I want to be the Joseph Papp of Frankford," Danson said with only the slightest hint of humor, referring to the late theater producer.
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NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
In South Korea, Kia calls its first full-blown luxury car the K9. That name just wouldn't do in the United States, allowed a faintly smiling Michael Sprague, the automaker's high priest of American marketing. So, when it makes its imminent debut in this country, it will be known as the K900. Good move. Who wants the most expensive car the company ever made to evoke Lassie? How many prospective buyers would welcome the vision of their friends leaving little packets of Purina Dog Chow under their wiper blades?
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In his 1973 play Equus , Peter Shaffer tells a detective story, based on an actual event, about a reluctant psychiatrist attempting to unravel the case of a 17-year-old boy who blinded six horses. The play's confrontation of religion with psychiatry helped set the tone for pop culture's understanding of mind and behavior. Forty years later, books by Oliver Sacks, shows on NPR, and hit TV shows and movies ( The Silence of the Lambs , Criminal Minds ) have fleshed out the genre and broadened popular knowledge of aberrant psychology.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
If you're looking to impress the Joneses next door, Hyundai's new top-of-the-line luxury sedan, the Equus, may disappoint. Oh, Hyundai has concealed its brand well enough to evade immediate detection. But, sooner or later, inquiring Joneses will want to know. And you'll have to reveal that, yes, it is a Hyundai - and you'll have to admit you spent about $60,000 on a Hyundai. But if you are more interested in impressing yourself, the outlook gets much brighter. The Equus is beautifully styled and has a spacious, luxury-laden interior and a cushy ride.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Let's get right down to it, the question people are asking: The answer is, yes, in Equus Daniel Radcliffe is very good-looking in the buff. You normally don't see big stars without a thread, so the play's Act 2 nude scene is a Broadway curiosity. But Radcliffe's no longer a child hanging around Hogwarts. He's 19, he's obviously been working out, and he's hugely talented in his first live stage role, even with clothes on. I should be so lucky. If I were, I'd get to play on Broadway opposite sweet, alluring Anna Camp, who is also jaybirding on stage - and she, who appeared in Mike Nichols' production of The Country Girl last season, looks great.
NEWS
September 25, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - Let's get right down to it, the question people are asking: The answer is, yes, in Equus , Daniel Radcliffe is very good-looking in the buff. You normally don't see big stars without a thread, so the play's Act 2 nude scene is a Broadway curiosity. But Radcliffe's no longer a child hanging around Hogwarts. He's 19, he's obviously been working out, and he's hugely talented in his first live stage role, even with clothes on. I should be so lucky. If I were, I'd get to play on Broadway opposite sweet, alluring Anna Camp, who is also jaybirding on stage - and she, who appeared in Mike Nichols' production of The Country Girl last season, looks great.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When writers, filmmakers and artists address the Holocaust, they struggle with the dilemma posed by mass slaughter carried out on an incomprehensible scale. Lay out the facts and images in all their enormity and barbarity - as in the great documentary film summation Shoah - and you face the danger of numbing the audience so that death becomes faceless. Distill the horror into individual experience - as in the stage and film versions of The Diary of Anne Frank - and you can be accused of trivializing what happened.
NEWS
October 29, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A theater director is, in the broad sense of the word, an artist. But when William Roudebush describes how he approaches directing, he sounds like an artist in its narrower definition of painter. His purpose, he says, is to bring out "the colors and hues the actors and technicians are capable of, to allow a painting to form in front of me - and be surprised, or dismayed, by how it turns out. " Roudebush's latest opportunity to surprise or displease himself is on view at Mum Puppettheatre, where his revival of The Madwoman of Chaillot will open tomorrow after a series of previews.
NEWS
October 8, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The revival of Equus by Mum Puppettheatre trotted away with five awards last night, edging out the musical Baby Case with four to become the most recognized production at the annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre ceremony. The production of Peter Shaffer's 1973 psychological drama about a disturbed boy who blinded horses, and the Arden Theatre Company's production of the new musical about the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby won the awards for overall production of a play and musical.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With the premiere of its new musical, Baby Case, receiving more citations than any other show, the Arden Theatre Company led area theaters with 16 nominations in the annual competition for the Barrymore Awards for Theatrical Excellence. Baby Case was cited 11 times at the announcement of the nominations yesterday in the Arden's F. Otto Haas Theatre, the same venue where the musical based on the 1932 kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby was staged. In all, 38 productions by 32 area theaters during the 2001-02 season received nominations for the eighth annual Barrymore Awards, which will be announced Oct. 7 at a ceremony in the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Before he became the master of the horses in the Mum Puppettheatre's new staging of Equus, choreographer Robert Smythe visited this year's Edinburgh Festival and chanced upon a production that showed him the dimensions of his problem and a possible solution. A local high school put on a street presentation of Peter Shaffer's landmark drama and played out the equine imagery with actors in elaborate horse masks. It is the traditional, safe way and one that adheres to Shaffer's careful and detailed instructions.
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