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Erectile Dysfunction

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I have low testosterone treated with Androgel applied once a day to my shoulder and upper chest area. It does seem to help, but I find the gel pretty messy. I know this is the most popular way low testosterone is treated, but why couldn't I just take testosterone pills instead? Answer: If it were only that easy! The problem is that testosterone in pill form just doesn't work well to correct a low testosterone level. When swallowed, it's absorbed in the digestive tract and sent to the liver, where not only is it heavily broken down, but it also exerts a direct toxic effect on the tissues of the liver before it has a chance to exert its desired effect on the rest of the body.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patent protection and product pipelines are top priorities for every pharmaceutical manufacturer, which is why Pfizer Inc. and Teva Pharmaceuticals International Ltd. will be in federal court in Norfolk, Va., starting Wednesday as Pfizer fights to keep exclusive rights to Viagra through 2019. Pfizer sells about $1 billion worth of the little blue pills per year in the United States to help men with erectile dysfunction, amounting to about 2 1/2 percent of the company's sales. Along with other pharmaceutical companies, Pfizer has been fretting because some top-selling drugs are nearing the dates at which generic-pharmaceutical firms can produce and sell similar products for less money.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband has erectile dysfunction for which he takes medication. He gets it from a friend. I have discovered that he takes the medication with him when he travels. He swears he isn't cheating on me and that he's faithful. Should I believe him? - Suspicious in Arizona DEAR SUSPICIOUS: I confess, my knee-jerk reaction after reading your letter was, "Uh-oh!" Then I called a doctor. His first words were, "That's an interesting question. " He then went on to say that if your husband has prostate problems in addition to his erectile dysfunction, you should believe him, because last October the FDA approved a low dose of one particular E.D. drug for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH)
NEWS
August 15, 2011 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Men of a certain need must spend more money for more years after a federal judge sided with drugmaker Pfizer Inc. as it tried to fend off a generic version of its erectile dysfunction drug Viagra in a patent-protection lawsuit. The suit pitted two of the world's biggest drugmakers - Pfizer and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. - both of which have local operations. Pfizer is the global leader in pharmaceutical sales and Teva leads the pack in generic drugs, which now account for about 75 percent of the market.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
More cringing - and possibly more explanation - is in store for parents watching TV with children when the latest Viagra commercials appear on screens. Euphemistic and delicate phrasing about erectile dysfunction by an unseen narrator? Done and gone. "So, guys, it's just you and your honey. The setting is perfect," says the blue-eyed blond woman with the British accent as she lies on a canopy bed with a tropical scene in the background. "But then, erectile dysfunction happens again.
NEWS
November 4, 2009
Talk about hard bargaining. In 2001, the Transport Workers Union Local 234 was up against stiff opposition, trying to get Viagra and other drugs covered for erectile dysfunction. The sticking point was the number of pills allowed under the prescription program. Well, the 10-pills-per-month program that was offered aroused such interest that the issue turned up again in these talks, but this time under cost containment. Some members wanted the pills every day. So, the E.D. sideletter was replaced in this year's labor contract - before any strike was discussed - to allow daily doses, with a caveat: "The prescription plan will cover daily doses of the drug to the extent that the monthly cost does not now or in the future exceed the monthly cost of the 10-pill prescription.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
FEDERAL PROSECUTORS Thursday filed new charges against a Philadelphia man they say schemed to smuggle counterfeit Viagra and Cialis pills into the country. According to an indictment, Randy Hucks, 50, whose street address was unavailable, illegally imported 10,188 fake Viagra tablets and 3,040 fake Cialis tablets from factories in China between November 2010 and March 2011. Hucks was initially indicted last June on charges of trafficking the fake Viagra. The new charges added smuggling and mail fraud for the fake Viagra, and smuggling, trafficking and mail fraud for the fake Cialis.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corp., which have a rival drug to challenge Viagra, announced a three-year sponsorship agreement yesterday with the National Football League. The deal, which gives Glaxo and Bayer exclusive marketing rights in the men's health category, is the league's first sponsorship with pharmaceutical companies, the NFL said. The league reversed its longstanding policy this year of banning advertising and corporate sponsorships by drug companies.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | By Caille Millner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sign that reads "Male Menopause Center" outside the facility in Northeast Philadelphia is very small. It's small for a good reason, explains the center's founder, Phillip Ginsberg, a urologist with the Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Men are usually nervous about coming into the center," he said. "A lot of them still believe menopause is a women's thing. " The definition of male menopause is still open to debate. It is considered to be one of the contributing factors to androgen deficiency, the lack of hormones that promote masculinization.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
More cringing - and possibly more explanation - is in store for parents watching TV with children when the latest Viagra commercials appear on screens. Euphemistic and delicate phrasing about erectile dysfunction by an unseen narrator? Done and gone. "So, guys, it's just you and your honey. The setting is perfect," says the blue-eyed blond woman with the British accent as she lies on a canopy bed with a tropical scene in the background. "But then, erectile dysfunction happens again.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband has erectile dysfunction for which he takes medication. He gets it from a friend. I have discovered that he takes the medication with him when he travels. He swears he isn't cheating on me and that he's faithful. Should I believe him? - Suspicious in Arizona DEAR SUSPICIOUS: I confess, my knee-jerk reaction after reading your letter was, "Uh-oh!" Then I called a doctor. His first words were, "That's an interesting question. " He then went on to say that if your husband has prostate problems in addition to his erectile dysfunction, you should believe him, because last October the FDA approved a low dose of one particular E.D. drug for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH)
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY MEERI KIM, For the Inquirer
Heart disease in women Does a heart attack really feel like an elephant on your chest? Not always, particularly if you are a woman. A study last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women, especially those under 45, were less likely than men to have chest pain before a heart attack. Symptoms can be more subtle: nausea, fatigue, shortness of breath, and discomfort in the neck or back. Subtlety can be dangerous: For both sexes, the absence of the classic chest ache was linked to delayed hospital trips, slower care and a higher death rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I have low testosterone treated with Androgel applied once a day to my shoulder and upper chest area. It does seem to help, but I find the gel pretty messy. I know this is the most popular way low testosterone is treated, but why couldn't I just take testosterone pills instead? Answer: If it were only that easy! The problem is that testosterone in pill form just doesn't work well to correct a low testosterone level. When swallowed, it's absorbed in the digestive tract and sent to the liver, where not only is it heavily broken down, but it also exerts a direct toxic effect on the tissues of the liver before it has a chance to exert its desired effect on the rest of the body.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Q: I'm a 25-year-old man who's tried several Internet dating sites and none of them have worked. They claim to be scientific and only match people who are compatible, but everyone I've met either had nothing in common with me, wasn't attracted to me or went off the grid after one date. I'm ready to give up, but I'm not meeting people through work or social contacts either, so I don't know what to do. STEVE: Don't take it personally. The dating failure rate is enormously high. The people who are most successful are the ones seeking the most opportunities.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
FEDERAL PROSECUTORS Thursday filed new charges against a Philadelphia man they say schemed to smuggle counterfeit Viagra and Cialis pills into the country. According to an indictment, Randy Hucks, 50, whose street address was unavailable, illegally imported 10,188 fake Viagra tablets and 3,040 fake Cialis tablets from factories in China between November 2010 and March 2011. Hucks was initially indicted last June on charges of trafficking the fake Viagra. The new charges added smuggling and mail fraud for the fake Viagra, and smuggling, trafficking and mail fraud for the fake Cialis.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Men of a certain need must spend more money for more years after a federal judge sided with drugmaker Pfizer Inc. as it tried to fend off a generic version of its erectile-dysfunction drug Viagra in a patent-protection lawsuit. The suit pitted two of the world's biggest drugmakers - Pfizer and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., both of which have local operations - against each other. Pfizer is the global leader in pharmaceutical sales, and Teva leads the pack in generic drugs, which now account for about 75 percent of the market.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patent protection and product pipelines are top priorities for every pharmaceutical manufacturer, which is why Pfizer Inc. and Teva Pharmaceuticals International Ltd. will be in federal court in Norfolk, Va., starting Wednesday as Pfizer fights to keep exclusive rights to Viagra through 2019. Pfizer sells about $1 billion worth of the little blue pills per year in the United States to help men with erectile dysfunction, amounting to about 2 1/2 percent of the company's sales. Along with other pharmaceutical companies, Pfizer has been fretting because some top-selling drugs are nearing the dates at which generic-pharmaceutical firms can produce and sell similar products for less money.
NEWS
November 4, 2009
Talk about hard bargaining. In 2001, the Transport Workers Union Local 234 was up against stiff opposition, trying to get Viagra and other drugs covered for erectile dysfunction. The sticking point was the number of pills allowed under the prescription program. Well, the 10-pills-per-month program that was offered aroused such interest that the issue turned up again in these talks, but this time under cost containment. Some members wanted the pills every day. So, the E.D. sideletter was replaced in this year's labor contract - before any strike was discussed - to allow daily doses, with a caveat: "The prescription plan will cover daily doses of the drug to the extent that the monthly cost does not now or in the future exceed the monthly cost of the 10-pill prescription.
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