CollectionsErin Brockovich
IN THE NEWS

Erin Brockovich

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | By Michelle Malkin
A good way to commemorate Earth Day 2000 would have been to skip "Erin Brockovich" and buy a good science textbook instead. Audiences and critics have fallen hard for Julia Roberts' low-cut, high-heeled portrayal of the real-life Brockovich. She's a foul-mouthed file clerk who took on an evil utility company that allegedly poisoned residents in the desert town of Hinkley, Calif. Brockovich scored $2 million in legal bonuses. Roberts made $20 million playing "Pretty Woman" meets "A Civil Action.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Erin Brockovich, a true-life Cinderella story, is about a plucky blue-collar babe (Julia Roberts) who uses her Wonderbra as a slingshot and fells a utility company that has contaminated groundwater. The film builds up to an epochal showdown between Erin and the Stepmom/Goliath, then denies it to us. Instead, we see Erin's endless legwork (and her endless legs!) as she deploys gams and cleavage in pursuit of evidence against Pacific Gas & Electric, and as she collects each of 634 names needed to bring off a direct-action lawsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A plane carrying Oscar-winning actor and philanthropist Paul Newman made an unscheduled landing earlier this week after it developed a minor electrical problem. Newman, 75, was flying from the Glens Falls, N.Y., airport late Monday afternoon after visiting a camp for seriously ill children he co-founded called Double H Hole in the Woods camp in Lake Luzerne. The electrical problem forced the pilot to land the private jet about 45 miles to the south at Albany International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
There comes a turning point in some actors' careers (if they're lucky) that signals the emergence of a major talent. Cary Grant came of age with "The Awful Truth"; Rock Hudson proved he was more than just beefcake in "Giant"; Julia Roberts? "Erin Brockovich. " With his superb performance last year in "About a Boy" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $26.99), new this week to video, we can add Hugh Grant's name to the list. The actor - he of the cutesy stammer and seductive grin - gives a gimmick-free performance to create a sympathetic though truthful portrait of a wayward, self-centered ne'er-do-well who quite unexpectedly finds his direction in life.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
They're supposed to say anything at the Golden Globe Awards, which have a reputation as an impromptu, drink-filled, celebrity free-for-all. That's why we watch, after all. But apparently they don't wear just anything. Stars at last night's presentation of the annual entertainment awards were, with few exceptions, drearily tasteful. Black gowns and suits abounded. Jennifer Lopez, in white satin, looked ready to party with Republicans. Even Angelina Jolie, who can usually be counted on to show up in Goth makeup, or rubber, with a leering sibling on her arm, looked as if a Hollywood stylist had finally gotten his mitts on her. Wearing a strapless golden gown, with her dark hair pulled back in a knot, Jolie sported only one accessory that hinted at her usual dangerous look - a "Billy Bob" tattoo on her left arm. Of course, Erin Brockovich - the real Erin Brockovich - wore a tacky blue dress, showing too much cleavage, but that's why Julia Roberts wanted to play her, right?
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Hugh Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
When most of the country last saw Erin Brockovich, she was savoring a $3.4 million check, part of a $333 million settlement she'd helped win against corporate polluter Pacific Gas & Electric. Of course, that was not the real Brockovich. Three years after Julia Roberts' Oscar-winning portrayal made the woman a household name, Brockovich is just emerging from another campaign, which began when the dream house she'd bought with her windfall turned out to be infested with toxic mold.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
Julia Roberts is in New York for the release of her latest film, "Erin Brockovich," opening Friday. Dressed in a knit wool purple dress that accentuates every curve of her tall, willowy figure, she's just given an uproarious performance at a press conference. Joking, cursing, referring to questioners as "Hon," speaking straight-forwardly and with intelligence on a variety of topics, Roberts seems like a younger version of Ann Richards, the hugely entertaining former governor of Texas.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | By Geneva Overholser
People say the darndest things about feminism. I was reminded of that by the review of Julia Roberts' latest flick, Erin Brockovich, in the New Yorker. You're reading along about what a terrific movie this is when this sentence comes out of nowhere: "At the very least, Erin Brockovich drives the last nail into the coffin of feminist sanctimoniousness. " Feminist sanctimoniousness? In case you haven't seen Erin Brockovich, Roberts plays a poor, very incorrectly dressed and foul-mouthed woman who - well, she vanquishes evil powers and helps the deserving.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2001 | by Gary Thompson Daily News Movie Critic
Five entered the Oscar arena, one came out - "Gladiator," a little bloodied, but unbowed. The epic of gladiatorial combat in ancient Rome won Best Picture and four other Academy Awards last night, eking out a victory over "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and "Traffic," which scored four Oscars apiece. "Gladiator" producer David Franzoni thanked "gentleman genius Ridley Scott, who transported us back in time so effortlessly and so beautifully" - perhaps small consolation to a director who saw his picture win, but who watched the Best Director prize go to "Traffic" and Steven Soderbergh.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | By Robert W. Tracinski
Is it possible to take a moral inventory of our culture - to see, in a single event, what, if anything, the most influential parts of our culture hold as the good? We take such a moral inventory every year at this time and broadcast it to the entire world: the Academy Awards, in which Hollywood names the films it regards as its best, most important, most uplifting products. For the purposes of this inventory, it does not matter which film wins; it is an honor, as they say, just to be nominated.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Erika Bolstad, Barbara Barrett and Lesley Clark, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Activists urged the government Tuesday to let people post and track cancer cases across communities, a public-health effort that they say could lead to discoveries of new chemical-related cancer clusters throughout the United States as well as insights into disease management. A doctor, a cancer survivor, and high-wattage environmental advocate Erin Brockovich told a Senate panel that no federal agency effectively tracks cancers in a way that easily allows scientists to determine the existence of cancer clusters.
NEWS
May 18, 2004
Nominee could shine a spotlight on S. Jersey I think it's great that State Sen. John Adler's wife, Shelley Levitan Adler, may soon serve on the New Jersey Motion Picture and Television Commission. Her nomination should be approved; South Jersey needs representation on the panel. If Mrs. Adler has connections in Hollywood and is willing to give freely of her time to help bring more film and television productions to New Jersey, then her presence is needed on the commission.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Margaret Mead, Gore Vidal and Ralph Nader have spoken there. So have the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Basil Rathbone, John Updike and Beverly Sills. Joyce Carol Oates was there last season, and Calvin Trillin will be there next April. This cast of world-renowned speakers did not have the World Affairs Council, or even an auditorium at the University of Pennsylvania, as their common podium. Their venue was Cheltenham High School, where the Five Star Forum has hosted discourse on politics, current events, science, the arts, history and the media since 1962.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
There comes a turning point in some actors' careers (if they're lucky) that signals the emergence of a major talent. Cary Grant came of age with "The Awful Truth"; Rock Hudson proved he was more than just beefcake in "Giant"; Julia Roberts? "Erin Brockovich. " With his superb performance last year in "About a Boy" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $26.99), new this week to video, we can add Hugh Grant's name to the list. The actor - he of the cutesy stammer and seductive grin - gives a gimmick-free performance to create a sympathetic though truthful portrait of a wayward, self-centered ne'er-do-well who quite unexpectedly finds his direction in life.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Hugh Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
When most of the country last saw Erin Brockovich, she was savoring a $3.4 million check, part of a $333 million settlement she'd helped win against corporate polluter Pacific Gas & Electric. Of course, that was not the real Brockovich. Three years after Julia Roberts' Oscar-winning portrayal made the woman a household name, Brockovich is just emerging from another campaign, which began when the dream house she'd bought with her windfall turned out to be infested with toxic mold.
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bruce Springsteen must have grabbed a nap after his early-morning performance on NBC's Today on Tuesday. Nine hours later, Bruce and the E Street Band were rested and rockin' at the Asbury Park Convention Hall, where they performed a sweaty two-hour, 40-minute dress rehearsal for their tour, which begins next Thursday in East Rutherford, N.J. In return for purchasing items from three Asbury Park merchants, fans qualified to buy $20 tickets to...
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | By Robert W. Tracinski
Is it possible to take a moral inventory of our culture - to see, in a single event, what, if anything, the most influential parts of our culture hold as the good? We take such a moral inventory every year at this time and broadcast it to the entire world: the Academy Awards, in which Hollywood names the films it regards as its best, most important, most uplifting products. For the purposes of this inventory, it does not matter which film wins; it is an honor, as they say, just to be nominated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2001 | by Gary Thompson Daily News Movie Critic
Five entered the Oscar arena, one came out - "Gladiator," a little bloodied, but unbowed. The epic of gladiatorial combat in ancient Rome won Best Picture and four other Academy Awards last night, eking out a victory over "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and "Traffic," which scored four Oscars apiece. "Gladiator" producer David Franzoni thanked "gentleman genius Ridley Scott, who transported us back in time so effortlessly and so beautifully" - perhaps small consolation to a director who saw his picture win, but who watched the Best Director prize go to "Traffic" and Steven Soderbergh.
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It was broadsword vs. broadsword in the Oscars arena, but in the end Gladiator vanquished Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, taking a total of five statuettes, including best picture and actor, for star Russell Crowe, at the 73d Academy Awards in Los Angeles last night. Julia Roberts added another man to her trophy shelf, winning the actress honor for her portrayal of an indefatigable legal secretary in Erin Brockovich. And in the evening's biggest surprise, Marcia Gay Harden took the supporting-actress prize for her ferocious performance as artist Lee Krasner in Pollock, the biography of painter Jackson Pollock.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
If you thought the musical offerings of the Backstreet Boys were hard on the ears, wait'll you hear them croon about their political pet causes. One member of the famous pop singing group, Backstreet Boy Kevin Richardson, has established an environmental foundation allied with the left-wing Sierra Club and Natural Resources Defense Council. The Seattle Times reports that the "teen star" visited the renowned Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center this week to promote environmental-health education.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|