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Ernest Hemingway

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NEWS
August 28, 1998
How long is testosterone's half-life? At least 38 years. Ernest Hemingway died during the Kennedy administration, but the final emanation of his macho spirit won't be published until the century's penultimate year. True at First Light is a 400-page "fictional memoir" culled by Papa's middle son, Patrick, from an 850-page manuscript. The draft was rescued from communist Cuba by the author's fourth wife and kept mostly under wraps for two decades at the John F. Kennedy Library.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | New York Daily News
Margaux Hemingway battled depression, family woes and other demons in the days before her sudden, mysterious death - even as her flagging career was on the upswing. "She was trying her best to get on with her life," said the Rev. Bill Minson, a longtime friend who counseled the statuesque ex-model. The Los Angeles coroners office yesterday said that the 41-year-old granddaughter of legendary writer Ernest Hemingway appears to have died of natural causes, possibly related to her epilepsy, for which she took medication.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Actress-model Margaux Hemingway, a granddaughter of famed writer Ernest Hemingway, was found dead in her studio apartment by the sea yesterday, police said. The identity of the body was confirmed through dental records, said Santa Monica Police Sgt. Gary Gallinot. An autopsy was scheduled this week to determine the cause of death. "There was no sign of forced entry and no obvious foul play," Gallinot added. "No guns or illegal substances were found in the apartment. " He also said it didn't appear to be a suicide.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | BY DAVE BARRY
Our topic today, in "The Sportsperson's Corner," is: Fishing Tips. Call me a masculine stud hombre if you wish, but fishing is in my bloodstream. This was also true of Ernest Hemingway, who wrote the masterpiece fishing novel "The Old Man and the Sea," later released as the major motion picture "Jaws. " It's the gripping story of an old man in a tiny boat who hooks a giant fish and fights it for days on the open ocean, surrounded by increasing literary tension, until finally, in a shocking and unforgettable ending, something happens that unfortunately I am not aware of because I never finished the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody needs a Papa to spin a story, and you can hardly do better than Ernest Hemingway. This rugged macho-man of a writer won both the Pulitzer Prize - for The Old Man and the Sea in 1953 - and the Nobel, which was awarded in 1954 and cited his "powerful, style-forming mastery of the art of narration. " Since tomorrow is the 90th anniversary of Hemingway's birth, it's a good time to dust off college lit memories and return to his world of fishing, drinking and, above all, loving life.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Speiser Katz, 80, an early principal of the Philadelphia School, a progressive private institution, died Sunday, Jan. 25, of Parkinson's disease at her Rittenhouse Square apartment. She was the principal and head of school from 1975 to 1982, first when the school was in a rented space at Rodeph Shalom Congregation on North Broad Street, and then when it moved to its current home at 25th and Lombard Streets. Mrs. Katz previously worked as a public-school teacher, first at South Philadelphia High School and then at Philadelphia High School for Girls, where she was dean of students.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Martha Gellhorn, 89, a pioneering American woman war correspondent and the third wife of Ernest Hemingway, has died in London, her family said yesterday. Ms. Gellhorn, who began her career during the Spanish civil war and went on to cover Vietnam and the Arab-Israeli wars, had been suffering from cancer and other ailments. "She had been quite ill for some time, but her mind was sharp to the end. I had dinner with her a few weeks ago," said journalist Marie Colvin, a close friend of Ms. Gellhorn's.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard L. Hannum, 86, of Upper Gwynedd, a professor of English literature at La Salle University for 40 years who wrote a compelling memoir about his combat experiences in World War II, died of cancer Friday, Dec. 2, at home. Dr. Hannum grew up in Germantown and graduated from La Salle College High School. In the summer of 1943, he was sports editor at the Germantown Courier before enlisting in the Army. On Dec. 8, 1944, he landed at Marseilles, and by Dec. 14, he was fighting with an antitank unit in the Ardennes in what would become known as the Battle of the Bulge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
You know that old party game. You gather in a circle. Someone whispers an anecdote or a presumed fact into the ear of the person next to him/her. The listener passes the tale to the person next to him/her. And so on around the circle. Then you compare how the tale began with how it ends up. The True Gen: An Intimate Portrait of Hemingway by Those Who Knew Him by Denis Brian (Delta, $10.95) is a bit like that game. Those who knew Ernest Hemingway sure disagree about him. Some say he was a coward, others that he was the bravest of men. Consider the famous episode when young Ernest, a volunteer ambulance driver for the Red Cross during World War I, was wounded severely, his right kneecap blown off. Somehow, he carried a wounded soldier 100 yards to safety, even though he remembered nothing of the incident.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Television Critic
There's an appealing moment tucked away deep within the six hours of the mini-series, "Hemingway" (Sunday through Tuesday at 8 p.m. on Channel 57). It's when Stacy Keach as Papa is about to receive a Bronze Star for all the stuff he did during World War II. As the U.S. ambassador to Cuba is reading the citation, Hemingway is, at first, standing at attention. Then, as the reading drones on, Hemingway slides his hands into his pockets, barely avoiding the impulse to fidget. By the time the medal is actually awarded, he has slipped back into something resembling attention.
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NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Speiser Katz, 80, an early principal of the Philadelphia School, a progressive private institution, died Sunday, Jan. 25, of Parkinson's disease at her Rittenhouse Square apartment. She was the principal and head of school from 1975 to 1982, first when the school was in a rented space at Rodeph Shalom Congregation on North Broad Street, and then when it moved to its current home at 25th and Lombard Streets. Mrs. Katz previously worked as a public-school teacher, first at South Philadelphia High School and then at Philadelphia High School for Girls, where she was dean of students.
TRAVEL
July 29, 2013 | By Alix Gerz, For The Inquirer
Too often we overlook the suburbs for the cities in our journeys, and a recent trip to America's heartland highlighted what a mistake that travel philosophy can be. Just 20 minutes west of Chicago lies Oak Park, a Victorian village whose quiet, tree-lined sidewalks belie a curious truth: Oak Park is a serious hotbed of 20th-century artistic Americana. Not one but two American cultural giants, architect Frank Lloyd Wright and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ernest Hemingway, have some deep Oak Park roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Ellen Gray
HATFIELDS & McCOYS. 9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, History Channel. HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN. 9 p.m. Monday, HBO.   "THERE ARE wars and there are wars," muses reporter Martha Gellhorn as she looks back at her long and turbulent life in HBO's "Hemingway & Gellhorn. "   No kidding. On Memorial Day, set aside to honor Americans who've lost their lives in their country's service, HBO and the History Channel go head-to-head with less-patriotic war stories featuring combatants who could have saved themselves and everyone around them a load of trouble if they'd only had the sense to get away from each other while the getting was good.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard L. Hannum, 86, of Upper Gwynedd, a professor of English literature at La Salle University for 40 years who wrote a compelling memoir about his combat experiences in World War II, died of cancer Friday, Dec. 2, at home. Dr. Hannum grew up in Germantown and graduated from La Salle College High School. In the summer of 1943, he was sports editor at the Germantown Courier before enlisting in the Army. On Dec. 8, 1944, he landed at Marseilles, and by Dec. 14, he was fighting with an antitank unit in the Ardennes in what would become known as the Battle of the Bulge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He strides through our consciousness, the epitome of bravura and self-conscious machismo. His unadorned Anglo-Saxon prose style won him a Nobel Prize and legions of imitators. But his picaresque lifestyle and ebullient persona - the rogue-adventurer ever in search of new wars to fight and women to conquer - secured Ernest Hemingway's place in the American mind. So suggests an engrossing centennial exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly four decades ago, early on Sunday, July 2, 1961, in his Ketchum, Idaho, cabin, a physically and emotionally defeated Ernest Hemingway placed a Boss double-barreled shotgun into his mouth and fired twice. He left a widow, three sons, and several unfinished manuscripts, many of which the Nobel laureate deemed unsuitable for publication. This July, the 21st to be precise, is the centennial anniversary of Hemingway's birth, an event that is being commemorated with: a hometown celebration in Oak Park, Ill., complete with "a movable feast" at local restaurants; the Thomasville Furniture Hemingway Collection (four lines: Kenya, Ketchum, Key West and Havana)
LIVING
April 13, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
From the moment Ernest Hemingway (1899- 1961) burst upon the literary world in the late 1920s, writers have clashed over his work and influence. "Some circumstance," complained Max Eastman in a 1933 New Republic review, "seems to have laid upon Hemingway a continual sense of the obligation to put forth evidences of red-blooded masculinity. . . . A literary style, you might say, of wearing false hair on the chest. " "What they could not bear," novelist Nelson Algren countered in 1979, dismissing Hemingway's critics years after the author's 1954 Nobel Prize put them in a distinct if vocal minority, "was that he was the best writer of English prose in the world and was making big money doing it. " Now, it's the centennial year of the macho man once regarded as the most famous, style-setting writer in the world.
NEWS
August 28, 1998
How long is testosterone's half-life? At least 38 years. Ernest Hemingway died during the Kennedy administration, but the final emanation of his macho spirit won't be published until the century's penultimate year. True at First Light is a 400-page "fictional memoir" culled by Papa's middle son, Patrick, from an 850-page manuscript. The draft was rescued from communist Cuba by the author's fourth wife and kept mostly under wraps for two decades at the John F. Kennedy Library.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Martha Gellhorn, 89, a pioneering American woman war correspondent and the third wife of Ernest Hemingway, has died in London, her family said yesterday. Ms. Gellhorn, who began her career during the Spanish civil war and went on to cover Vietnam and the Arab-Israeli wars, had been suffering from cancer and other ailments. "She had been quite ill for some time, but her mind was sharp to the end. I had dinner with her a few weeks ago," said journalist Marie Colvin, a close friend of Ms. Gellhorn's.
LIVING
July 4, 1996 | By W. Speers By K. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press, the New York Post and Reuters
In her final interview, done June 7 in cyberspace, Margaux Hemingway said she had learned the secret of life. "You have to keep fighting. That's what life is all about - leading with your heart," Hemingway said. Hemingway, 41, was found dead Monday in her Santa Monica, Calif., apartment. Her observations on life and other subjects were made during a "Celebrity Spotlight" cyberchat on the Prodigy online service. She said that she had been plagued with dyslexia most of her life and that she had suffered from diabetes and epilepsy as well.
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