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Erosion

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NEWS
October 19, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Coming soon to an eroding road embankment near you: The politically correct, biodegradable "soft engineering" solution. Soft engineering - also called bioengineering - combines natural materials and plants to stop erosion along stream banks and shorelines. It's very much a part of highways in the 1990s, says the state Department of Transportation, which cites its recent success with Route 282 at Brandywine Creek in Chester County. In the heyday of trash dumps and pollution-spewing cars, a problem like the creek eating away at the road embankment would have been solved with "hard" stuff like a retaining wall or wire gabions filled with rocks.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
Severe erosion problems at the Beagle Club, the Woods and other large construction sites in Voorhees Township are causing serious environmental problems, township officials told a group of builders last night. During a meeting of Township Committee members and about 10 local builders, officials said that lakes and streams in the township were becoming overly silted and storm drains were becoming filled with sand because of a lack of proper sediment controls at the sites. In some cases, roads have become filled with sand from nearby developments, creating safety problems for motorists, officials said.
NEWS
February 24, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local conservationists contend that Tredyffrin officials are not adequately inspecting construction sites in the township or enforcing the ordinance that requires builders to guard against soil erosion. As a result, storm water laden with topsoil is pouring into local creeks and damaging the region's fragile ecosystem, they said. "There is so much development going on in our township now, it appears they can't keep up with making sure that erosion- and sedimentation-control plans are being adhered to," Mitsie Toland, president of the Open Land Conservancy of Chester County, said last week.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
The East Brandywine Township Board of Supervisors has expressed concern over soil erosion problems that might occur during winter if developers proceed with plans to break ground on Phase III of the Timberlake development before landscaping Phase II of the 58.7-acre cluster community the township. Supervisor Alan H. McCausland opposed leaving too much open ground through winter at last week's presentation of plans for Phase III and Phase IV by developers Russell Stump of Downingtown and Earl Savino of Chadds Ford.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
A representative of the company in charge of maintaining two closed Cinnaminson landfills, both cited as the main sources of contamination on a 400-acre Superfund site, said that severe erosion of a protective clay cap and drainage swale was being repaired and that no hazardous material had left the site. Frank Quirus, Superfund coordinator for Waste Management of North America, said last week that the problems were "well under way to getting resolved" and that an on-site erosion control system prevented extreme damage to the landfills.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | By Bill Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
Haddon Heights officials are blaming the state Department of Transportation for soil erosion that is chewing away the banks of Little Timber Creek and unearthing buried trash along the edge of an abandoned town dump. The state Department of Environmental Protection has asked the borough to implement erosion-control measures at the former Devon Avenue municipal dump, which lies along the banks of the meandering creek. But Mayor August A. Longo told the Borough Council last night that correcting the erosion would be a major undertaking and that the Transportation Department should "engineer, fund and implement the project.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer
Developer Richard Dilsheimer faces a fine for violations of clean-water and erosion-control laws at the Wickerton Farms development in London Grove Township. State Department of Environmental Resources officials said after a meeting Thursday that Dilsheimer's firm, General Construction Co. of Philadelphia, has agreed to correct violations at the 75-acre site within a week and pay a fine for past violations. The amount has not been agreed upon, DER attorney Louise Thompson said after the meeting with developers and state officials at the Chester County Conservation District office in West Chester.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rivers of mud cascading off the exposed hillsides of the Blue Route have become a major problem in recent months, forcing road-construction shutdowns, polluting a local stream and costing thousands of dollars in extra work, state officials say. Part of the problem is heavy rains - but part also is a contractor who did not follow the state's plans, according to Pennsylvania Department of Transportation officials. Either way, erosion has become such a problem that in recent months: The state's Department of Environmental Resources (DER)
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
As dune grass goes, sea oats has a lot going for it. It takes root quickly, covering a dune in 18 months, and is not bothered by the insects and diseases that play havoc with other dune grass. But it has a minor flaw: It can't stand the cold. Good for Florida's beaches; not so good for New Jersey's. On the other hand, Sea Isle Japanese Sedge doesn't mind the cold. Or the bugs. But the stuff takes so darn long to grow - nearly three years to cover a dune. The garden variety dune grass, Cape American, can cover the same dune in less than a year, even in cold weather.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Richard Weisman controls the waves and the tides. In a 100-foot-long tank in the middle of Bethlehem, Pa., he runs a model ocean, with wave heights and sand kept in precise scale. Underneath the tiny beach is a drainage system that he hopes can keep the sand dry and up where beach lovers want it to stay. Weisman has been testing the principle that wet sand is more likely to erode and that his drains, by keeping the sand dry, will prevent the sand from sweeping out to sea. His system consists of beach drains, pipes with holes in them, buried below the beach, parallel to the shore.
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NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
As his wife, Pat, watched anxiously, Jack Monaghan climbed the slatted dune fence that once separated their Strathmere home from a state park, and pointed down at the crashing sea. "There used to be a beach out there," he said last week. Now, exposed black boulders and a slender, 10-foot cliff are about all that remain of Corson's Inlet State Park's southern shoreline. In just a month, the Monaghans and state officials say, ocean waves have carried away most of the 98 acres of sand dunes where park visitors strolled or fished or beached their boats, and where endangered piping plovers, black skimmers, and least terns scampered and nested.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Golden opportunity for city It was a pleasure to see Jane Golden, the executive director of the Mural Arts Program, receive such well-deserved recognition ("For Phila.'s next mayor, consider a broader canvas," Sunday). While her work and words present her as an admirable woman of enviable achievement, the accompanying photographs give you an even better sense of her character: vital and vivacious, intelligent and engaging, not someone posing for a media moment. Anyone who has had even a brief interaction with her would know this to be true.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Reviewed by David Kairys
Rights at Risk The Limits of Liberty in Modern America By David K. Shipler Alfred A. Knopf. 400 pp. $28.95 Best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler believes America has "lost its way" since 9/11. "Constitutional rights are routinely overwhelmed," he says in his new book, Rights at Risk, "largely out of sight in criminal courts and interrogation rooms, in offices of prosecutors and immigration bureaucrats, and in schools. " While we talk about freedom and liberty a lot, there has been little opposition as the Patriot Act empowered the federal government to ask store owners what books we buy and what videos we rent, and to compile these and our political preferences in government files.
SPORTS
January 23, 2012 | By Evan Burgos, For The Inquirer
When the National Federation of State High School Associations announced in late April the most sweeping changes in wrestling weight classes since 1988, many in the sport's local community were left scratching their heads. Ten of the 14 high school divisions were increased in weight. The most glaring change was the subtraction of a middle weight class and the addition of an upper weight - the 195-pound division. And though four weight classes were retained - including 145, 152, and 160 - they effectively represent a shift to a heavier overall lineup.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By HOPE YEN, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Squeezed by rising living costs, a record number of Americans - nearly one in two - have fallen into poverty or are scraping by on earnings that classify them as low income. The latest census data depict a middle class that's shrinking as unemployment stays high and the government's safety net frays. The new numbers follow years of stagnating wages for the middle class that have hurt millions of workers and families. "Safety-net programs such as food stamps and tax credits kept poverty from rising even higher in 2010, but for many low-income families with work-related and medical expenses, they are considered too 'rich' to qualify," said Sheldon Danziger, a University of Michigan public-policy professor who specializes in poverty.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
Christopher DeMuth is D.C. Searle Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, and was AEI's president from 1986 to 2008 Competition is a fact of life - the driving force of biological evolution and a constant presence in all human interactions. It is also a method of organization, used to promote efficiency and excellence and to resolve conflict peaceably. Competition is the key to the success of private-market economies and is used in many other areas; for example, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes spur competition in the sciences and in journalism.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - The spiritual mentor of Iran's president has harshly criticized him for his role in an internal power struggle that has split the country's hard-liners, indicating that Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's own support base is badly fraying. The cleric is the latest high-profile figure to censure Ahmadinejad, who set off the spiraling political confrontation last month by firing the intelligence minister without consulting the country's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who quickly reinstated him in a public slap to the president.
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Newton Lake has a problem. The weeds around it are too damn high . A fringe of underbrush, bushes, and saplings is flourishing at the water's edge in this 103-acre Camden County park in Haddon Township, Collingswood, and Oaklyn. The "riparian buffer" of greenery, now fading to autumn brown, filters pollutants, inhibits erosion, provides habitats - and obscures many views of Newton Lake and Creek. "Why does it have to be six feet high?" asks longtime lake neighbor Bob Gauld, who has organized a petition drive (300-plus signatures so far)
NEWS
December 21, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jorge Cavenas insisted there was a car under there somewhere. The New York City man had left his family's minivan in an Atlantic Avenue parking lot overnight, only to return yesterday to find that snow from Saturday's massive storm had covered the vehicle so that only a small section of the rooftop luggage rack was visible. "I think I'm going to be here awhile," laughed Cavenas, 37, using a broom and a small ice scraper to remove the snow. "Maybe all day. " Over in Ocean City's Gardens section, where winding streets through neighborhoods of snow-covered vacation homes made the place look like a winter wonderland, year-rounder Kim Raymond had resigned herself to the fact that digging out her car and driveway would take all day. "I put some chili in the crock pot this morning, and by the time I'm finished out here, it'll be ready," said the 37-year-old ER nurse.
NEWS
November 14, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood and Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Kim Corbi, a lifelong resident of Ocean City, N.J., is accustomed to seeing dunes. But not where she saw them yesterday. Some of the dunes designed to protect the town from the anger and caprice of the Atlantic Ocean had been transported to residents' front yards. The sand was driven landward by relentless howling wind, rain, and crashing waves from the worst coastal storm to pound the Jersey Shore in more than a decade. "It's the first time I've seen anything like this in a while," said Corbi, who works at a Wawa store on 34th Street.
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