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Eskimos

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NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The Inuits - or Eskimos - have a myth to explain the origin of the sun and the moon. Walter Vail of Pitman was delighted to tell the legend. "The sun and moon were sister and brother. But the brother made love to the sister in an igloo one dark night. She got so embarrassed she glowed red and melted the igloo and ran into the sky. The moon chased her - still chases her - but can never catch her. " Vail, 61, chuckled. "If you like that one, I'll tell you how the Inuits believed thunderstorms were made.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When archaeologists dug up the 800-year-old body of a tiny Eskimo girl last year, they needed an autopsy to figure out why she had died. It was a perfect case for pathologist Michael Zimmerman, a sort of Quincy for mummies. After months of puzzling over misleading clues, Zimmerman, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, says he discovered that a rare illness killed the girl, whose body remained frozen near Alaska's desolate northern coast. When erosion exposed the body last year, its skin, hair and face were remarkably well preserved.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For 11 years, Robin Heller has drawn what is arguably the world's only Eskimo comic strip. Mukluk and Honisukle, which chronicles the adventures of an Eskimo couple, their son Tobi and dog Hood and a handful of Alaskan neighbors, runs in about 25 newspapers, primarily in the 49th state and Canada. Heller, however, lives thousands of miles away from the tundra he animates using only black felt-tip pens and his vivid imagination. The 55-year-old artist is a resident of Perkasie.
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Interior Department's planned auction tomorrow of offshore oil-leasing rights in shallow Bristol Bay, the nation's richest salmon-fishing waters, was temporarily blocked yesterday by a federal judge. U.S. District Judge James A. von der Heydt, acting on suits filed by an unusual coalition of Eskimos, environmentalists and the state of Alaska, said the Interior Department had failed to adequately evaluate the effects that oil exploration and drilling would have on the subsistence lifestyle of Eskimos who live around the bay. A typical Eskimo household consumes about 600 pounds of the fish each year, according to surveys, and Eskimos also sell salmon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many Americans, Eskimos conjure up an image of a primitive people who huddle in igloos to stay warm, chew on seal blubber for sustenance and eke out a desperate living in the frozen wastelands of the far North. A new exhibit at the University Museum, "Raven's Journey: The World of Alaska's Native People," challenges those Hollywood images. The permanent exhibit, which opens tomorrow in honor of the museum's centennial, presents to the public more than 400 rare artifacts - many never before displayed - as well as large blowups of rare Alaskan photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | By ROSEMARY ANDALORA, Special to the Daily News
Among native Alaskans, the shiny, black-plumaged raven held an important mythological role. This large croaking bird was used to explain such phenomena as the creation of the world, the arrival of mosquitoes, and the ability to cook smoked salmon. The raven is a major figure in "Raven's Journey: the World of Alaska's Native People," which opens tomorrow at the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania. The collection includes nearly 400 art works that present a fascinating look into the culture and creativity of turn-of-the- century native Alaskans.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Christine M. Flowers, Philadelphia Daily News
I REMEMBER WHEN President Obama went on what some conservatives (including this one) called the "apology tour. "It was shortly after he took office three years ago, and provided his critics with a lot of snarky material. Karl Rove wrote in the Wall Street Journal that "A superstar, not a statesman, today leads our country. " He was referring to the fact that foreign audiences loved the image of an American president distributing mea culpas for what the vast majority of his compatriots viewed as making the world a safer and more-prosperous place.
SPORTS
December 12, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Late on Thursday afternoon, two old men named Hank and Jerry were having their customary sit on a bench on the boardwalk in Ventnor, N.J., when they encountered something unexpected. In the fading light of a beautiful late-fall day, a very tall and very skinny man, dressed in the style of an astronaut and carrying something over his head, passed before the two men. "Is that a boat?" Hank asked. "No," said the tall and skinny man, who was wearing two hats and whose name was Steve Burkardt.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | By MIM SWARTZ, Special to the Daily News
Skeptics thought the Russians put one over on Secretary of State William Seward in 1867 when he bought Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million. They thought the region was a wasteland of ice and snow, calling the purchase "Seward's Folly" and "Seward's Icebox. " They were wrong. Alaska proved to be rich in fish, minerals, timber and potential water power. The value of resources taken from the region has paid back the purchase price - which worked out to less than 2 cents an acre - hundreds of times.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The caller on the language hotline of the International Visitors Center of Philadelphia sounded plaintive. "How do you say 'Happy Birthday' in Inuit?" she asked the staffer who took the call. "I have to put it on a birthday cake. " It wasn't Mission Impossible, as Ella Russell Torrey remembers, but it was close enough. Inuit is what some Eskimos call themselves and their language - and how frequently do you see it written or spoken in these parts? "Our people got right on it," Torrey was saying yesterday at the International Visitors Center office in the Civic Center, Civic Center Boulevard at 34th Street.
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NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Christine M. Flowers, Philadelphia Daily News
I REMEMBER WHEN President Obama went on what some conservatives (including this one) called the "apology tour. "It was shortly after he took office three years ago, and provided his critics with a lot of snarky material. Karl Rove wrote in the Wall Street Journal that "A superstar, not a statesman, today leads our country. " He was referring to the fact that foreign audiences loved the image of an American president distributing mea culpas for what the vast majority of his compatriots viewed as making the world a safer and more-prosperous place.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
THIS IS the time of year when millions of men eagerly await the arrival on newsstands of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. Indeed, SI sells more of this issue at newsstands than any other issue by far. The nightly news will have features on which model made the cover. ESPN will bring us the making of the SI Swimsuit issue. And what is causing all of this commotion? Pretty girls, in bathing suits. SI is selling tap water and millions of men are buying it. Think about it - you can see these same models dressed in less in a Victoria's Secret catalogue, for free.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During much of the 19th century, many in the western world were obsessed with the idea of finding a path through the Arctic Ocean to the North Pole. "The men that sought the Pole were neither saints nor supermen, but ordinary creatures subject to human strengths and frailties . . . [and] remarkably passionate," writes Canadian historian Pierre Berton in his book The Arctic Grail. One man who fits that definition is Isaac I. Hayes, a physician from Chester County. In July 1860, Hayes sailed north in command of an Arctic expedition in search of the legendary Open Polar Sea, according to Berton.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For 11 years, Robin Heller has drawn what is arguably the world's only Eskimo comic strip. Mukluk and Honisukle, which chronicles the adventures of an Eskimo couple, their son Tobi and dog Hood and a handful of Alaskan neighbors, runs in about 25 newspapers, primarily in the 49th state and Canada. Heller, however, lives thousands of miles away from the tundra he animates using only black felt-tip pens and his vivid imagination. The 55-year-old artist is a resident of Perkasie.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | By Tony Pugh, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Ignoring minus-40-degree wind chill, a dozen villagers knelt over narrow holes cut through five feet of ice, and prepared to harvest a meal from the frigid waters below. Within an hour, using only wooden sticks, 10-foot lines and basic lures, the group had jigged more than 250 smelt from the Unalakleet River. Not one fish measured longer than a foot, but the effort showed that even in the dead of winter, this harsh, subarctic region is teeming with life, both wild and human. About 800 people live in Unalakleet - and the U.S. government is coming to count them.
FOOD
June 11, 1997 | by Peter F. Stevens, For the Daily News
A small, freckle-faced boy was standing inside Christian Nelson's store in Onawa, Iowa, taking his sweet time deciding between an ice cream sandwich and a chocolate bar. Frustrated, Nelson tried to slap a scoop of ice cream between two sugar wafers. He missed, and the ice cream splashed into a vat of simmering chocolate. He quickly rescued the scoop of vanilla from its syrupy bath and saw that some of the chocolate had hardened on the ice cream. "Can't make up your mind what you want?"
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When archaeologists dug up the 800-year-old body of a tiny Eskimo girl last year, they needed an autopsy to figure out why she had died. It was a perfect case for pathologist Michael Zimmerman, a sort of Quincy for mummies. After months of puzzling over misleading clues, Zimmerman, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, says he discovered that a rare illness killed the girl, whose body remained frozen near Alaska's desolate northern coast. When erosion exposed the body last year, its skin, hair and face were remarkably well preserved.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A string of 16 one-pound lead weights hung from Robert Okpeaha's left ear as he skuttled around the Big Dipper Arena. Hunched over, his hands folded behind his back, Okpeaha circled the floor once, twice, then five times. His head trembled from the weight. The crowd screamed encouragement. Finally, after Okpeaha had gone 1,241 feet - six times farther than any other contestant - the string of weights slipped off his ear and hit the floor with a thud. The spectators roared their approval.
SPORTS
December 12, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Late on Thursday afternoon, two old men named Hank and Jerry were having their customary sit on a bench on the boardwalk in Ventnor, N.J., when they encountered something unexpected. In the fading light of a beautiful late-fall day, a very tall and very skinny man, dressed in the style of an astronaut and carrying something over his head, passed before the two men. "Is that a boat?" Hank asked. "No," said the tall and skinny man, who was wearing two hats and whose name was Steve Burkardt.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For hundreds of years the Inuit people, early inhabitants of arctic Quebec, have seen visions in soapstone. Slick young seals playing in the water, a large, long-tusked walrus tilting back on its rear, polar bears at rest and on the attack, Eskimo men and women ice fishing, a beaver on a rock, spiral-tusked narwhals, giant owls and other birds of prey. It is the size and form of raggy soapstone blocks, found in the many quarries surrounding their settlements, that shape those visions, according to Inuit culture.
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