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Espionage

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
A father advises his young son Charles, "You don't in any circumstances whatever let anyone, even someone young and friendly, get himself alone with you. The people you get to know you meet at home or at school. It just isn't worth it, Charles. The risk is too great. In a nutshell, to use the old cliche, you don't talk to strange men. " The novel is called Talking to Strange Men by Ruth Rendell (Ballantine, $3.95) and you know bloody well that Charles is going to talk to a strange man. But how he does so and under what circumstances make for ingenious novel- writing.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He has committed murder, betrayed men who counted him as a friend, even burned down his own house. There seems very little Abe Woodhull (Jamie Bell), wouldn't do to serve the Patriot cause. Played with great control, impressive nuance and wit by Bell, Abe is the hero of Turn: Washington's Spies, AMC's spy thriller about the American Revolution, which returns for its second season with a feature-length installment at 9 p.m. on Monday. Abe's greatest sin, however, is to embark on a career despised by all men of breeding as illegitimate, dishonorable and sleazy: espionage.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Jerry Abejo INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A federal grand jury indicted former FBI agent Robert Hanssen yesterday on 21 counts of spying. In one of the most serious such cases in U.S. history, Hanssen faces one count of conspiracy to commit espionage, 19 counts of espionage, and one count of attempted espionage. He could get the death penalty or life in prison for disclosing the names of Soviet spies for the United States who subsequently were executed. Hanssen, 57, a father of six who was arrested Feb. 18, was indicted in Alexandria, Va., after plea negotiations between his lawyers and the Justice Department broke down.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | By Susan Bennett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher yesterday gave French leaders "an earful" about French government-sponsored industrial spying in the United States, according to a senior official traveling with the secretary. "He made it clear in plain language that the United States was pursuing this matter," the official said. In an interview on the plane carrying him from Paris to Moscow, Christopher confirmed that industrial spying by France "was discussed between the foreign minister and me. " He would not make "any further comment on that intelligence matter.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF Inquirer staff writer Donna Shaw contributed to this article
Prompted by the threat of industrial espionage, Montgomery County authorities have arrested two men and a woman in connection with the theft of 46 computers from a Lansdale warehouse of the pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co. One of the men had sought money from Merck in exchange for the information on the computers' whereabouts and the return of one of them, authorities said. In announcing the arrests yesterday, First Assistant District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said investigators were still trying to determine whether the trio ever intended to share information, possibly contained on the computers' hard drives, with any of Merck's competitors.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Carol Pollard walked into Rabbi Allan Tuffs' office at Temple Shalom on Friday wheeling a suitcase behind her - a suitcase she's been living out of for almost three years. "I think of myself as a robot," she declared. "I see 4,000 people a week. " Pollard, who spoke to the congregation during a Friday night Shabbat service, travels all over the world to rally support for her brother, Jonathan Pollard, who was convicted in 1986 of passing classified information to Israel when he served as a civilian analyst for U.S. Naval Intelligence.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1989 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A Canadian accused of trying to sell his company's computer trade secrets to a Unisys Corp. executive at a Monday meeting in Blue Bell, Montgomery County, was released on a $100,000 bond yesterday. U.S. Magistrate William F. Hall Jr. refused to accept a federal prosecutor's contention that the defendant, Anthony S. Latchoo, 28, of Rexdale, Ontario, Canada, might fail to appear in court because the government probably lacks the authority to extradite him under existing treaties.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The word from the shadowy world of private espionage is that a tape of President Clinton's video grand jury testimony tomorrow afternoon will probably be in someone's hands by tomorrow night. The only foolproof way to avoid this, private investigators said, is to do exactly what the President doesn't want to: be in the same room as the grand jury. "I have no doubt that five minutes after his testimony is finished a video copy of it will be made somewhere. The question is, by who?"
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A 38-year-old retired Air Force sergeant who worked on U.S. spy satellites was charged yesterday with conspiring to sell secret satellite images and computer codes. Authorities declined to name the prospective buyer or buyers of that information, but two U.S. officials familiar with the case told the Inquirer Washington Bureau on condition of anonymity that Libya was one of them. A third U.S. official, who also asked not to be identified, said the suspect, Brian P. Regan of Bowie, Md., had been "offering his services" to more than one foreign government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is something deeply perverse about Manhattan , cable channel WGN's well-executed, edge-of-your-seat drama that returns for its second season at 9 p.m. Tuesday. Writer-producer Sam Shaw's series is an espionage thriller/domestic melodrama posing as historical epic. It's a fictionalized story of the scientists at Los Alamos, N.M., who developed the A-bomb during WWII. Manhattan is an overwrought, overripe piece of pulp fiction stuffed with overboiled intrigue.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - On any weeknight five months ago, Xiaoxing Xi could have been working in a laboratory at Temple University, the mild-mannered professor mentoring the dozen graduate students who flocked to the campus last year to work alongside the world-renowned researcher. Wednesday, however, a soft-spoken Xi sat before an audience in Washington to speak about the last four months - a time he said has been defined by "tremendous" amounts of suffering as he fell under suspicion as an economic spy in a case that has since been withdrawn.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He has committed murder, betrayed men who counted him as a friend, even burned down his own house. There seems very little Abe Woodhull (Jamie Bell), wouldn't do to serve the Patriot cause. Played with great control, impressive nuance and wit by Bell, Abe is the hero of Turn: Washington's Spies, AMC's spy thriller about the American Revolution, which returns for its second season with a feature-length installment at 9 p.m. on Monday. Abe's greatest sin, however, is to embark on a career despised by all men of breeding as illegitimate, dishonorable and sleazy: espionage.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just when you thought every kind of spy story had been told, here comes AMC's new espionage drama, Turn , which tells the story of the spies who played a key part in the birth of our nation. An uneven, if promising, period drama set during the American Revolution, the series premieres at 9 p.m. on Sunday. Based on historian Alexander Rose's 2006 book, Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy , the drama chronicles the key role a group of covert agents on Long Island called the Culper Ring played in helping George Washington formulate his strategy against the British.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Given recent revelations of wholesale surveillance at odds with the Constitution and even the broad latitude granted to authorities after 9/11, President Obama's newly proposed espionage reforms are remarkably grudging. Obama's speech on the subject last week reaffirmed the suspicion that if there is going to be leadership on reining in our rampant surveillance state, it's not likely to come from him. Obama did offer a few significant concessions to Americans' justified alarm at some of the National Security Agency programs revealed by rogue contractor Edward Snowden, particularly in proposing changes to the agency's mass collection of telephone data.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner and Sharaf al-Hourani, Washington Post
CAIRO - Egyptian authorities escalated their battle against ousted leader Mohammed Morsi and his supporters Friday, launching an investigation into espionage and murder allegations against him as millions took to the streets in rival demonstrations across the country. The allegations marked the state's first legal steps against Morsi, who has been held incommunicado since he was deposed as president earlier this month in a military coup. The steps were taken as the military supervised mass rallies in Cairo that it had called to back its "mandate" to confront violence and "terrorism" - terms that Morsi's supporters and rights groups interpreted as signaling an imminent crackdown.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Peter Finn and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Federal prosecutors have filed a sealed criminal complaint against Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked a trove of documents about top-secret surveillance programs, and the United States has asked Hong Kong to detain him on a provisional arrest warrant, according to U.S. officials. Snowden was charged with espionage, theft and conversion of government property, the officials said. The complaint was filed in the Eastern District of Virginia, a jurisdiction where Snowden's former employer, Booz Allen Hamilton, is headquartered and a district with a long track record of prosecuting cases with national security implications.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The actress and writer Brit Marling, virtually unknown only a few years ago, has now starred in three modest but memorable indies: Another Earth , an eerie sci-fi tale; Sound of My Voice , an eerie suspenser about a cult and its enigmatic leader; and now The East , a taut espionage drama that pits global corporations against a radical band of ecoterrorists. It's more than a little eerie, too. In The East , Marling - piercing, perceptive, charismatic in an un-movie-star-like way - is Sarah Moss, an ex-FBI agent who lives with her boyfriend (Jason Ritter)
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Dinesh Ramde and M.L. Johnson, Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - When three vials of a possible cancer-fighting compound disappeared recently from a professor's desk at the Medical College of Wisconsin, suspicion quickly fell on a research assistant who had been working in the scientist's lab. Security video showed Hua Jun Zhao, who studied in China and whose wife lives there, was the only person who entered the professor's office that day. Investigators later found research results from another fellow...
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