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Estate Planning

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NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Pamela Yip, DALLAS MORNING NEWS
Estate planning may be the last thing on the minds of many single people, but it really should be at the top of their list. "If you're single, you're kind of out there by yourself," said Norm Lofgren, estate planning attorney at Looper, Reed & McGraw in Dallas. "The thing that people have to understand is that people do die when they're young. If you don't have your affairs together, you add the trauma on top of the tragedy. " Planning ahead simplifies things for your loved ones.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, a man knocked on the door of Harry Hildebrand's Pottstown home. Hildebrand, now 80, remembers the fellow as "a nice man and a real good talker. " The stranger was pushing something called a living trust, a document that essentially replaces a will and supposedly saves much of the delay and expense of probate - the process of settling an estate. Hildebrand said he had listened for an hour and liked what he heard. "So I said I'd take one," he said. Hildebrand paid $3,995 for the package of papers.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For people approaching retirement or senior status, take a bit of advice from those already there: Don't expect all of life's complications to automatically go away. There will be new financial and legal issues, along with long-term care concerns and the task of navigating through the maze of health insurance and government benefits. Add to this the need to protect against predators who seek to deceive, exploit or defraud the elderly, and one can appreciate the effort put forth by the Montgomery County Bar Association to help seniors make appropriate choices.
NEWS
May 24, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Byron R. Prusky, 72, of Penn Valley, a lawyer and certified public accountant, died of cancer yesterday at home. For more than 40 years, Mr. Prusky practiced law in the areas of tax planning, estate planning and employee benefits, and he was responsible for incorporating more than 500 small and medium-sized businesses. He participated in seminars on living trusts and estate planning, was a guest on the former WWDB-FM radio program Legal Perspectives, lectured extensively, and wrote articles in legal journals.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
WASHINGTON - At first, when I heard Prince didn't have a will, I was sad. After all, the iconic singer, whose full name was Prince Rogers Nelson, was ferociously protective of his music and his image. He once wrote "slave" on his face to protest a music deal that left him without ownership of his work. During the dispute, you'll recall, we had to refer to him as "the Artist Formerly Known as Prince. " I came to respect the symbol that he used as his name for a while because he was fighting for his legacy.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondents Julie Blair and Stephanie Stanley contributed to this story
A federal grand jury yesterday indicted a Bucks County man on charges of bilking dozens of people, most of them elderly, out of $1.4 million in a Ponzi-type scheme. Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary E. Crawley said William Palmer, 51, was charged in a 28-count indictment with billing himself as an investment adviser, encouraging people to invest money with him and lend money to his company, promising them returns of 12 to 25 percent a year. Instead, says the indictment, Palmer used the money to pay off earlier investors and for his personal and company expenses.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Ed Polisher goes to work each morning with a pocketful of reminders, little one or two-word notes he scribbles to himself and stuffs into his shirt pocket. The important ones he highlights with a red arrow: Advil, Hearing Aid, Newsletter . . . "What the hell is this one? I can't read my own writing. " Hey, when you reach the big 9-6, count your blessings you can still write. Polisher counts a lot. The 96-year-old attorney has been going to the office now for 75 years - longer than any practicing attorney in the city.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Will robo-advisers fully replace human financial advisers, because they're cheaper and more efficient? No way. And those who think so misunderstand what financial advisers do. "My clients pay me for advice, a holistic financial and retirement plan," as well as referrals to experts in trust and estate planning, said Michael Kitces, who runs a financial planning firm and follows the robo-adviser field. He's a huge fan of robos, which offer automated portfolio management, as well as automatic saving and investing and cutting-edge adviser software.
NEWS
August 29, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Few people like to think about their eventual demise, but ignoring the inevitable could financially harm the ones left behind. Financial experts agree that it's important to take some time to leave clear instructions that provide for your loved ones. If you don't, the courts will decide what will happen to your money and possessions, or you may leave your family and friends with difficult decisions to make. A new free set of publications is available from the Federal Citizen Information Center, the MetLife Consumer Education Center, the American Bar Association and the Legal Services Corp.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors are wondering if self-styled financial consultant William R. Palmer went to church only to prey on others. Palmer, 51, of Washington Crossing, Bucks County, was indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury on a variety of fraud charges in an alleged four-year, $1.4 million swindle of 32 elderly investors, including four members of the New Life Christian Church, in Newtown, the church he attended. According to the indictment, Palmer gained the trust of church members and others by advertising "estate planning from a Biblical perspective" in religious publications.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Will robo-advisers fully replace human financial advisers, because they're cheaper and more efficient? No way. And those who think so misunderstand what financial advisers do. "My clients pay me for advice, a holistic financial and retirement plan," as well as referrals to experts in trust and estate planning, said Michael Kitces, who runs a financial planning firm and follows the robo-adviser field. He's a huge fan of robos, which offer automated portfolio management, as well as automatic saving and investing and cutting-edge adviser software.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
WASHINGTON - At first, when I heard Prince didn't have a will, I was sad. After all, the iconic singer, whose full name was Prince Rogers Nelson, was ferociously protective of his music and his image. He once wrote "slave" on his face to protest a music deal that left him without ownership of his work. During the dispute, you'll recall, we had to refer to him as "the Artist Formerly Known as Prince. " I came to respect the symbol that he used as his name for a while because he was fighting for his legacy.
NEWS
October 23, 2015
IT HAS BEEN 18 months since my mother died, and we are finally close to settling her estate. It hasn't been easy. My mother had refused to get a will and so, in addition to dealing with her death, my sister and I had to sort through the financial chaos she left behind. I don't think my mother, had she understood the toll it would take on us, would have wanted to leave things as she did. But our story isn't unusual. Recently I received another cautionary tale about the lack of estate planning from a reader who called herself a "disinherited daughter.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My wife and I were asked by family members whether we would take their kids should they die. We said we wanted to think about it, and, after a few days, came back to them and said we would, but we first wanted to know a few things, like the details of their life insurance policies, whether they have savings set aside for their kids' college, etc. The family members' response was, "You...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Single parents, listen up: A few pen strokes now can save you thousands of dollars later and leave your children more financially secure, too. Estate and retirement planning is crucially important for single parents, both men and women. Many think their assets and retirement income will automatically pass directly to their children. Not so. If you, the single parent, die early, without the right legal documents signed, a huge chunk of your assets can end up with an ex-spouse or with the government.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
College season is upon us, so we thought it would be helpful to look at some overlooked advantages of 529 college savings plans. These 529 plans "come with a number of important advantages beyond just tax credits, as compared to other savings vehicles," said Steven D. Brett, president of Marcum Financial Services in New York. "Many people don't realize how much flexibility a 529 plan gives them or the role it can play in planning for future generations, once their own children complete their educations.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
THROUGH the years, I've shared a lot of personal stories. I do so because I hope to spare others from making financial mistakes. I want to tell you about something I'm going through that I hope will lead you to take action - today. My mother was in a house fire and is in critical condition in a burn center. She's on a ventilator. As we work with the health professionals, we are coming up against a lot of roadblocks that have created a lot of stress. My mother was fiercely protective of her personal information.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The U.S. equity market is on a tear and has now gone 82 weeks without a three-week losing streak - one of the longest rallies in the past 40 years. Will the streak end? Possibly, but in any case, you've probably made some serious profits in stocks in 2013, and now is the time to rebalance - meaning, sell some equities, take some money off the table. But do so in a tax-efficient way, advises Donald DiCarlo, managing director of wealth advisory services for Wilmington Trust in Villanova.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER DUBLIN In 1912, Richard V. Mattison transformed his Upper Dublin mansion into a castle, befitting a man who could be called a baron of industry. Mattison, a pharmacist and founder of an Ambler company that was once a leading asbestos manufacturer, created what became a stone monument to the area's history and a backdrop in the 1966 movie The Trouble With Angels . But decades later, the majestic structure once known as Lindenwold Castle and its 45 acres of rustic surroundings are slated to be sold to developers who want to build more than 350 houses marketed primarily to seniors and empty-nesters.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial South Jersey developer narrowly avoided incarceration Monday afternoon when he paid $41,400, per a judge's orders, toward the upgrade of a potentially dangerous Medford dam he previously owned. In May 2004, the state Department of Environmental Protection sued Joseph Samost's former development company for failing to repair the Centennial Lake Dam, saying a breach could result in deaths and significant property damage. After several rounds of litigation and appeals, a judge appointed a receiver to oversee improvements to the earthen dam, which the DEP cited for having inadequate spillways as early as 1979.
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