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Eternal City

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TRAVEL
August 7, 2011 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
It's my third visit to Rome, and the second time that the cobblestone streets of this ancient metropolis serve as my bed. I'm not alone under the dark Roman sky. Thousands in sleeping bags, on cardboard, on thin blankets, transform the area along the Tiber River into a makeshift urban campground. But for many of us, sleep is elusive - not because of the uneven stones, but from ardent anticipation. At this moment, the Eternal City could be described as the "city that never sleeps.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
If Steve Riedell's abstract paintings speak of time, process and memory, it's because they literally embody these things. They've been built, painted, scraped, rejiggered, and repainted, but the basic template remains. They look contemporary but move us in the way that distinguished old buildings do when we catch them in a certain light. Riedell's latest body of work, "Rome Paintings," at Larry Becker Contemporary Art, was inspired by the light he saw while visiting that city. Beneath Riedell's final monochromatic coats of white, gray, and pale aqua, streaky evidence of deeper, previously applied colors can be seen, as if revealed by the ravages of time.
LIVING
June 11, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alan Epstein is taking his own advice - doing as the Romans do by living la dolce vita. And now, five years after moving to Rome, Epstein has collected his impressions of his adopted city in a charming new book, As the Romans Do: The Delights, Dramas, and Daily Diversions of Life in the Eternal City (William Morrow, $20). In the book, Epstein not only covers all the things one would expect in a book about the Eternal City, but also such topics as the sexiness of Romans, being a Jew in Rome, tasty trattorias and hidden bakeries, and two of his favorites, a chapter on anarchy and another on hanging the wash and other joys.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I am in the Eternal City facing the traveler's eternal dilemma - how to balance cost with comfort in accommodations. I read in a guidebook that an increasing number of Rome's convents are renting out rooms. Yes, it turns out, even to good Jewish girls like me. For centuries, convents have put up pilgrims in guest rooms. But during the Holy Year celebration of the millennium, 20 million tourists - religious and otherwise - are expected to visit Rome. To meet that demand, the Italian government is offering low-cost mortgages and home-improvement loans to convents willing to reopen their doors to the tourist trade.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia commuter traffic may seem hellish to us, but to someone from the Eternal City, it's heaven. "Yes, it's heaven compared with Rome," said Maurizio Tomassini, and he should know. He's head of the systems and innovation directorate for the Rome Transportation Authority. Tomassini and dozens of other transportation experts were in Philadelphia yesterday to take part in "Impacts '98," an annual three-day workshop of policy- makers brought here this year by Denise Goren, the city's deputy mayor for transportation.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest patient for a former Philadelphia surgeon is the City of Rome. Last week, Ignazio Marino won 64 percent of the votes in the Italian capital's mayoral race. He resectioned Rome's ties to incumbent Mayor Gianni Alemanno, promising to suture the Eternal City with a more transparent government. Marino, 58, worked extensively in Philadelphia before his foray into politics. From 2002 to 2006, he did nearly 200 organ transplants at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In his last year, he headed the transplant division.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Lea Zamiecka clung to a red support pole as the bus, fondly known as the "pickpocket express," bumped - in stops and starts - toward Vatican City. Her eyelids drooped from lack of sleep, and her shoulders slumped under the weight of the backpack the 27-year-old student had stuffed at the last minute in Germany. Under one arm, she carried a foam mat for sleeping. Her zip-up sweatshirt was all she had for warmth. "I cannot describe what happened," she said of her sudden decision to come to Rome.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So OK, Rome's a pretty neat place, what with the Colosseum and the Vatican and all that historical stuff. But does it have Amish? Does it have soft pretzels? Does it have an Independence Hall or a Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center? Of course not. And just so Romans and other Italians truly appreciate what they are missing, Gov. Ridge and Mayor Rendell and a Pennsylvania delegation of about 20 public and private officials are making a personal visit to the Eternal City this week to sell the Keystone State to Italian tourists for all it is worth.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The pilgrims have reached the Eternal City: giddy, jet-lagged and each with a story to tell. Blessed Mother Katharine Drexel, the uncommon denominator for 1,333 official pilgrims and thousands more traveling on their own, will be canonized as a Roman Catholic saint Sunday in a solemn and colorful ceremony in Piazza San Pietro at the Vatican. The outdoor ceremony, which will be televised live in Philadelphia at 4 a.m. EDT, also recognizes as saints a former slave woman from the Sudan, the founder of a Spanish religious order and 120 Chinese Christian martyrs over three centuries.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest patient for a former Philadelphia surgeon is the City of Rome. Last week, Ignazio Marino won 64 percent of the votes in the Italian capital's mayoral race. He resectioned Rome's ties to incumbent Mayor Gianni Alemanno, promising to suture the Eternal City with a more transparent government. Marino, 58, worked extensively in Philadelphia before his foray into politics. From 2002 to 2006, he did nearly 200 organ transplants at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In his last year, he headed the transplant division.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2011 | By Paula Marantz Cohen, For The Inquirer
ROME - It is still hot in Rome this time of year. That doesn't mean you shouldn't go. In fact, a little sweat seems a small price to pay for the chance, at almost every corner, to duck into a church where you can sit in the shade and stare at a lustrous virgin by Raphael or a strenuously ardent saint by Caravaggio. Still, on a recent trip to the Eternal City we happened to lodge in the ancient Trastevere section, and on one particularly sweltering day, not wishing to walk too far, we crossed the Tiber River to explore the nearby neighborhood, Rome's former Jewish ghetto.
TRAVEL
August 7, 2011 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
It's my third visit to Rome, and the second time that the cobblestone streets of this ancient metropolis serve as my bed. I'm not alone under the dark Roman sky. Thousands in sleeping bags, on cardboard, on thin blankets, transform the area along the Tiber River into a makeshift urban campground. But for many of us, sleep is elusive - not because of the uneven stones, but from ardent anticipation. At this moment, the Eternal City could be described as the "city that never sleeps.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
If Steve Riedell's abstract paintings speak of time, process and memory, it's because they literally embody these things. They've been built, painted, scraped, rejiggered, and repainted, but the basic template remains. They look contemporary but move us in the way that distinguished old buildings do when we catch them in a certain light. Riedell's latest body of work, "Rome Paintings," at Larry Becker Contemporary Art, was inspired by the light he saw while visiting that city. Beneath Riedell's final monochromatic coats of white, gray, and pale aqua, streaky evidence of deeper, previously applied colors can be seen, as if revealed by the ravages of time.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Lea Zamiecka clung to a red support pole as the bus, fondly known as the "pickpocket express," bumped - in stops and starts - toward Vatican City. Her eyelids drooped from lack of sleep, and her shoulders slumped under the weight of the backpack the 27-year-old student had stuffed at the last minute in Germany. Under one arm, she carried a foam mat for sleeping. Her zip-up sweatshirt was all she had for warmth. "I cannot describe what happened," she said of her sudden decision to come to Rome.
NEWS
July 20, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soon after his 1994 installation as head of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of St. Louis, Archbishop Justin Rigali decided to visit the archdiocesan seminary. Rigali - who last week was named the new archbishop of Philadelphia - had for the previous 33 years lived in Rome, where he had steeped himself in the Eternal City's culture, climbed the ranks of the Vatican hierarchy, and driven cars very fast. So when he arrived to discover that Kenrick-Glennon Seminary had a long, straight driveway, Rigali floored the gas pedal.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her giant banner has hung since midweek from the face of St. Peter's Basilica. A canopied, outdoor altar stands on the steps of the spiritual center for her canonization Mass. A sea of gray chairs fills the center of St. Peter's Square. And thousands of her friends and admirers are here in the Eternal City, scarcely able to believe "the day" is at hand. Forty-five years after Philadelphia's Mother Katharine Drexel died at 96, Pope John Paul II will formally declare her a saint of the Roman Catholic Church early today during a canonization Mass scheduled for 10 a.m. in Rome, 4 a.m. Philadelphia time.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The pilgrims have reached the Eternal City: giddy, jet-lagged and each with a story to tell. Blessed Mother Katharine Drexel, the uncommon denominator for 1,333 official pilgrims and thousands more traveling on their own, will be canonized as a Roman Catholic saint Sunday in a solemn and colorful ceremony in Piazza San Pietro at the Vatican. The outdoor ceremony, which will be televised live in Philadelphia at 4 a.m. EDT, also recognizes as saints a former slave woman from the Sudan, the founder of a Spanish religious order and 120 Chinese Christian martyrs over three centuries.
LIVING
June 11, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alan Epstein is taking his own advice - doing as the Romans do by living la dolce vita. And now, five years after moving to Rome, Epstein has collected his impressions of his adopted city in a charming new book, As the Romans Do: The Delights, Dramas, and Daily Diversions of Life in the Eternal City (William Morrow, $20). In the book, Epstein not only covers all the things one would expect in a book about the Eternal City, but also such topics as the sexiness of Romans, being a Jew in Rome, tasty trattorias and hidden bakeries, and two of his favorites, a chapter on anarchy and another on hanging the wash and other joys.
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