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Eternal Life

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NEWS
September 18, 1997 | By Msgr. S.J. Adamo
Are we done with dying? Are the funerals over? Can we forget the obsequies? Let us now rejoice in living! Yes, it is good to be alive! And yes, eternity can wait! The preachers say there is nothing like the joys of eternity, and yet most if not all of us studiously avoid death! Who is really eager to rush into eternity? How many times have I seen dying people fend off death with all the power that remained in them. It is an instinctive revulsion at the primeval enemy.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dale Drews believes that when a person dies, there is no spiritual encore. There is no coming back as someone else, no eternal home in heaven or hell. For him, life after death is about as likely as the prospect of Madalyn Murray O'Hair waiting in line for a face-to-face with St. Peter. Simply put, not a prayer. There is hope after death, he says. It's just not one that has anything to do with individual immortality. Drews, a retired professor who lives in Center City, is a "religious humanist" and an atheist.
NEWS
May 14, 2007
DESPITE ALL the verbal cheerleading about this city, the reality is that it will always be in decline because of a cultural legacy of neglect of its citizenry and parochialism, both of which have left Philadelphia with low human capital. In other words, you are stuck with a disproportionate number of uneducated citizens, with much of the city's leadership included. Administratively, Philly is more like Transylvania in its vampiric thirst for sucking money from its residents via fines, fees and taxes, promising in return only an eternal life of incompetence in the delivery of basic services.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
We will defend to the death your right to believe that you can buy eternal life in a bottle at the health store. We do not, however, believe that the manufacturer of the product has the right to promote the stuff as providing eternal life, whether it's made of papaya enzyme or the finest and purest desiccated elk droppings. That is the basic issue in the battle over the Hatch-Richardson legislation that has thrown the quack industry into a tizzy. People who use dietary supplements, as well as more exotic products, are told the government wants to take their goodies away.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
RE THE letter from Kevin Flanagan titled "Abortion: Maybe It's God's Will": I can most assuredly tell you from reading the Bible that it is not God's will that people who call themselves doctors kill innocent human beings. God has no penchant for destruction. If anyone deserves destruction it is not innocent unborn human beings - it is Americans who have allowed abortion to continue in this nation for more than 30 years. We have innocent blood on our hands. Maybe it's the U.S. who is next to be disciplined.
NEWS
August 7, 2010 | By BENNY HINN
ARE MIRACLES for today? In a word, yes! The scriptures are clear: Jesus not only died to take away our sins, but he died to take away our sicknesses. By his stripes and sacrifice, we are healed: "He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5). God's divine touch upon a broken body or mind is not merely a phenomenon from bygone days. His ability to perform the miraculous has never been restricted to a certain time frame in church history.
NEWS
April 2, 2010 | By B.G. Kelley
Easter time is a reminder of our mortality - that we will die. But 70 percent of Americans believe religion can lead to eternal life, according to a study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. In the secular age we live in, spirituality seems to loom larger when we are about to die. Once we stare death square in the face, most of us will want to believe it is not a separation, but a transformation - not termination, but transcendence. As Rousseau wrote, "He who pretends to look on death without fear lies.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Superior Court Judge Paul A. Lowengrub yesterday appointed a medical guardian to determine whether a blood transfusion is needed for a critically ill 15-year-old girl who, like her parents, opposes the transfusion for religious reasons. Suzanne Koerner of Monroeville, Gloucester County, a Jehovah's Witness, was hit by a car as she waited for a school bus early Thursday morning, injuring her left arm and leg. After emergency surgery Thursday, the leg wound remained open and the girl continued to lose blood, according to testimony yesterday by Dr. Christine Rehm of Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Last fall, Paul Overstreet, suddenly successful writer of two Randy Travis hits and member of the fast-rising pop-country recording trio SKO, was sitting in a Bible-study class hearing a comparison of the temporal and the eternal. It was a comparison, Overstreet says, between what will live forever and what will "burn. " "As a Christian believing in Jesus, I believe that I have eternal life after I die in this life," the Mississippi minister's son explains, "so all the things I do on this earth that bear spiritual fruit will live eternally after I die - they will be my treasures forever - and everything else will burn.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | by JACK NOLAN
Hilary's last spring at the University of Vermont, she took us out on a fire escape to watch the sunset. It was her solitary communion with nature and she shared it with us. We never felt closer to my stepdaughter. A month later, Hilary disappeared. A single terse letter followed. Hilary assured us she was well. She had found peace and we should not worry about her. What did we do? We worried. A month later, Hilary's backpack was found by Burlington, Vt., police, and returned to us. We feared the worst - that Hilary was the victim of foul play.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By David Goldfield
We are marking the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War. So what? Most Americans seem indifferent.   That's a pity. The Civil War can tell us a great deal about ourselves, then and now. We have an unfortunate history of plunging into wars for God and democracy that have often made a mockery of both. If we can use this anniversary to learn more about why we rush to war, it will be an exercise worth undertaking. More than 750,000 men died in the Civil War. Extrapolated to today's population, the death toll would be close to 10 million.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't be surprised if the Rev. Thomas W. Logan smiles during next Sunday's Gospel reading. It will be on eternal life - a topic about which he seems to know a thing or two. And don't be surprised if the friends, family, congregants, and bishops packed into St. Thomas African Episcopal Church in Overbrook applaud his sermon. Logan turns 100 next week, and the historic parish, where he is an active associate priest, is celebrating the life of the oldest African American cleric in the Episcopal Church.
NEWS
August 7, 2010 | By BENNY HINN
ARE MIRACLES for today? In a word, yes! The scriptures are clear: Jesus not only died to take away our sins, but he died to take away our sicknesses. By his stripes and sacrifice, we are healed: "He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5). God's divine touch upon a broken body or mind is not merely a phenomenon from bygone days. His ability to perform the miraculous has never been restricted to a certain time frame in church history.
NEWS
April 2, 2010 | By B.G. Kelley
Easter time is a reminder of our mortality - that we will die. But 70 percent of Americans believe religion can lead to eternal life, according to a study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. In the secular age we live in, spirituality seems to loom larger when we are about to die. Once we stare death square in the face, most of us will want to believe it is not a separation, but a transformation - not termination, but transcendence. As Rousseau wrote, "He who pretends to look on death without fear lies.
NEWS
July 18, 2007 | CAROL TOWARNICKY
GOD WORKS in mysterious ways. Consider: A Catholic girl who 45 years ago prayed on Good Friday for the conversion of the Jews is now a middle-aged convert to Judaism trying to explain why Jews feel threatened by the possible return of that very same Good Friday prayer. That girl, that Jew, would be me. Last week, Pope Benedict XVI, in a move widely interpreted as an attempt to reconnect disgruntled Catholic traditionalists with the church, gave his OK to use the Latin mass that was forcibly retired in the 1960s.
NEWS
May 14, 2007
DESPITE ALL the verbal cheerleading about this city, the reality is that it will always be in decline because of a cultural legacy of neglect of its citizenry and parochialism, both of which have left Philadelphia with low human capital. In other words, you are stuck with a disproportionate number of uneducated citizens, with much of the city's leadership included. Administratively, Philly is more like Transylvania in its vampiric thirst for sucking money from its residents via fines, fees and taxes, promising in return only an eternal life of incompetence in the delivery of basic services.
NEWS
July 14, 2006 | By Nannette Croce
If you haven't heard the predictions of baby boomers bleeding Social Security and Medicare dry, then you've probably been sharing Osama bin Laden's cave. According to a May 2004 project by the National Center for Policy Analysis "in just 15 years, the federal government will have to raise taxes, reduce other spending, or borrow $761 billion to keep its promises to America's senior citizens. " However, this outcome is not inevitable. Due to our numbers, we boomers have set trends for every era we've passed through, and old age need be no exception.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
RE THE letter from Kevin Flanagan titled "Abortion: Maybe It's God's Will": I can most assuredly tell you from reading the Bible that it is not God's will that people who call themselves doctors kill innocent human beings. God has no penchant for destruction. If anyone deserves destruction it is not innocent unborn human beings - it is Americans who have allowed abortion to continue in this nation for more than 30 years. We have innocent blood on our hands. Maybe it's the U.S. who is next to be disciplined.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dale Drews believes that when a person dies, there is no spiritual encore. There is no coming back as someone else, no eternal home in heaven or hell. For him, life after death is about as likely as the prospect of Madalyn Murray O'Hair waiting in line for a face-to-face with St. Peter. Simply put, not a prayer. There is hope after death, he says. It's just not one that has anything to do with individual immortality. Drews, a retired professor who lives in Center City, is a "religious humanist" and an atheist.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
Choosing a belief system to guide one's life It was interesting to read such a variety of beliefs concerning the source and meaning of life (Letters, Jan. 6). Since there is no compelling answer to this question, it seems that we are free to believe whatever we want. We can believe that it all came to be by itself, with no particular purpose. And so life is like a dead-end street that goes on for so many years and stops. There is no reward or punishment for anything you do, except what you get in this world.
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