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Ethanol

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NEWS
June 15, 2011
WASHINGTON - The Senate yesterday refused to kill a $5 billion annual subsidy for ethanol, backing continued government aid for a Farm Belt-based industry over deficit-reduction in an era of record red ink. The 40-59 vote, far short of the 60 needed to advance the measure, reflected regional as well as partisan differences, a split among Republicans - and hardly the final word on the issue. "We continue to spend money that we don't have on things that we don't need," said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., a deficit hawk who led the bid to kill the subsidy.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Mills thinks he's found a way to use Chester County's mountains of wastepaper and make money in the process. Mills, a Fairfax, Va., consultant who specializes in economic development, wants to build a plant here that would convert paper to ethanol, which is a component of "gasohol," a motor vehicle fuel used as an alternative to pure gasoline. The plant would be the first commercial venture of its kind in the nation. It would use technology developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Virginia consultant who hopes to build a plant in Chester County that would convert paper to ethanol has received a grant from the state, a step he considers key to gaining further backing for the project. The state has awarded a $30,000 grant to George Mills of Fairfax, Va., and his proposed company, Cogent Energy. The money is from a state program designed to develop emerging energy technologies that will lessen environmental impact. The grant still must be approved by the state Attorney General's Office, but Darlene Crawford, press secretary for the state Energy Office, said there was little chance the funding would be withdrawn.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
Stephen P. Kunz's screed against hydraulic fracking ("Coal set the stage for natural-gas free-for-all," Thursday) actually worked to endorse the drilling-for-gas technique. My family has lived in and around the western Pennsylvania coal regions for 50 years, and not once in anyone's memory has long-wall mining ever been mentioned as an environmental concern. On the contrary, for decades, long-wall mining has saved thousands of coalfield jobs and helped make those jobs safer. It is interesting that in so long a piece about the environmental horrors of long-wall mining, Kunz cites not one example of such a project gone bad. Rather than publishing anybody with something bad to say about fracking - irrespective of whether any facts are adduced to support the argument - The Inquirer might want to expose the easily demonstrated environmental harm done by ethanol production and wind turbines.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2006 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While gasoline prices have been a pain to the average driver, a much smaller group is doing quite well. First, there are the big oil companies. Then there are the oil-exporting nations such as Saudi Arabia. And the folks at companies such as ATS Environmental Inc. "We're totally booked for weeks, including Saturdays and Sundays, until we catch up," said Charles Tiso, operations vice president at ATS Environmental, of Sparta, N.J. "It's like anything else. People waited until the last minute.
NEWS
September 16, 2002
New Jersey is coming late to feed at a public trough that should have been emptied long ago. A South Jersey consortium of farmers and agribusinesses wants a piece of the heavily subsidized ethanol market, a boon heretofore reserved for the Midwestern states. Ethanol is a liquid fuel made primarily from corn. Added to gasoline, it reduces carbon monoxide emissions. The N.J. consortium proposes a $60 million plant in either Gloucester or Salem County to distill 14.5 million bushels of corn a year into 40 million gallons of the additive.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An overturned tanker spilled ethanol on I-95 in Bensalem early yesterday, closing the highway in both directions for more than 12 hours and diverting about 100,000 motorists onto side streets, officials said. The truck was traveling south at 2:20 a.m. when the left front tire went flat, causing the driver to crash into the median guardrail, state police said. The truck spilled ethanol, which is highly flammable. A crew from Rohm & Haas, the chemical company, then drained the remainder of the liquid from the truck into another tanker, said Charlie Metzger, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2011
"We consider it likely that food inflation will prove to be more pernicious and durable this time than in the '70s. " - Don Coxe, of Coxe Advisors L.L.P. "The race is on to find a way of saying Greece hasn't really defaulted even though it's not making good on its interest payments. Good luck with that. " - Niall Ferguson, history professor at Harvard University. "Investors had their initial emotional flush with the stock. Then they got a strong dose of reality.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Scott Bomboy, CONSTITUTION DAILY
Bomboy is editor-in-chief of the National Constitution Center . How could the worst national drought in decades have a direct impact on the November general election? It's as simple as two words: gasoline and corn. News broke on Tuesday that prices at the pump jumped 5.1 percent in July, their biggest monthly increase in 12 years. While it may seem a stretch to connect failing crops with gas prices, changes in our national energy policy have made ethanol a key component of retail gasoline sold in the United States.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | By Jerry Knight
Some land-grant scientist long ago proved that you could turn a sow's ear into a silk purse - or at least nylon. Now, more Midwestern magic is attempting to transform withered cornstalks into Christmas trees, bedecked with multimillion-dollar gifts for the nation's richest agribusiness alchemist. At a time when drought is threatening to wipe out the nation's corn crop, some farm-state lawmakers want to give away government corn at bargain- basement prices to a company that plans to turn it into fuel.
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NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - Talk about juice. Bruce Rastetter, a multimillionaire agribusiness baron and the largest GOP donor in Iowa, got almost all of the potential 2016 Republican presidential candidates - at least 11 of them - to agree to come to the Iowa State Fairgrounds on Saturday for a forum on agriculture issues. They were to sit down on stage for one-on-one, 20-minute interviews with Rastetter, discussing their positions on labeling for genetically modified food, proposed federal regulation of groundwater, foreign trade agreements - and, perhaps above all, the future of Iowa's important corn-based ethanol industry.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The struggle of oil vs. biofuels has split the industrial and political elites in Philadelphia, as it has elsewhere. Delaware River oil refiners and their energetic new owners - Carlyle Group, Delta Airlines, PBF Energy - are doing their part to process the output of the vast, new North American energy fields. Oil arrives here by train, pipe, and barge to fuel what they hope will be an industrial renaissance and a projection of renewed American economic power overseas. Together, these oilmen prevailed on Philadelphia Democrat U.S. Rep. Bob Brady to urge Vice President Biden to help delay Environmental Protection Agency guidelines mandating the use of more ethanol (corn-based alcohol)
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pour a few handfuls of chopped-up corn stalks or switchgrass into a hopper. Heat rapidly. Funnel the resulting mixture through an intricate network of metal pipes and canisters. Out the other end - drip, drip - comes a thick brown liquid that looks an awful lot like oil. Called bio oil, it is not quite the same as what comes out of a well. But it is close enough that government scientists think the process, called fast pyrolysis, is a promising way for farmers to enhance energy security.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2013 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency is overestimating the amount of fuel that can be produced from grasses, wood, and other nonfood plants in an effort to promote a fledgling biofuels industry. At issue is a 2007 renewable fuels law that requires a certain amount of those types of fuels, called cellulosic biofuels, to be mixed in with gasoline each year. Despite annual EPA projections that the industry would produce small amounts of the biofuels, none of that production materialized.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Scott Bomboy, CONSTITUTION DAILY
Bomboy is editor-in-chief of the National Constitution Center . How could the worst national drought in decades have a direct impact on the November general election? It's as simple as two words: gasoline and corn. News broke on Tuesday that prices at the pump jumped 5.1 percent in July, their biggest monthly increase in 12 years. While it may seem a stretch to connect failing crops with gas prices, changes in our national energy policy have made ethanol a key component of retail gasoline sold in the United States.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oil-industry experts told a congressional panel on Thursday that regulations requiring more ethanol in motor fuel and setting stricter federal emission standards have driven some refineries out of business. A Joint Economic Committee hearing in Washington on the effect of the closure of Philadelphia area refineries turned into a broad-spectrum denunciation of federal environmental mandates. U.S. Sen. Robert Casey (D., Pa.), the committee's chairman, called the hearing in response to moves by ConocoPhillips and Sunoco Inc. to sell or shut down their Philadelphia area refineries.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2012 | Andy Maykuth
A $270 million bankrupt Western Pennsylvania ethanol plant, Bionol Clearfield L.L.C., which opened in 2009 and shut down last year, has been sold to a Michigan agricultural company for $9.35 million, according to a filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware. Pennsylvania Grain Processing L.L.C., an affiliate of Zeeland Farm Services Inc., announced Monday that the court had approved the purchase. The Clearfield plant can process up to 40 million bushels of grain per year into 110 million gallons of ethanol and 330,000 tons of dry distiller's grain, a livestock feed.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARFIELD, Pa. - Five years ago, officials of Getty Petroleum Marketing Inc. enlisted then-Gov. Ed Rendell to help build Pennsylvania's first ethanol plant in this borough of 6,100 people, a badly needed investment in a community battered by coal's long decline. The state agreed to support the $270 million project with $27 million in grants and loans and by issuing $67 million in tax-free bonds. Getty agreed to buy the ethanol to blend into its gasoline. But by the time the plant began converting corn into ethanol in December 2009, the market for the additive had soured.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2011
"We consider it likely that food inflation will prove to be more pernicious and durable this time than in the '70s. " - Don Coxe, of Coxe Advisors L.L.P. "The race is on to find a way of saying Greece hasn't really defaulted even though it's not making good on its interest payments. Good luck with that. " - Niall Ferguson, history professor at Harvard University. "Investors had their initial emotional flush with the stock. Then they got a strong dose of reality.
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