FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters and the New York Daily News.)
Bob Geldof, who raised $140 million for hunger relief through Band Aid and Live Aid, plans to go to Ethiopia Monday to help head off a new wave of mass hunger there, his organization said yesterday in London. The Irish rocker will spend 10 days in the African nation conferring with experts. "Band Aid still has about $20 million left, and if Geldof feels there's a need for it to be sent to Ethiopia, it will be sent to relief groups there," said a spokeswoman for the singer. Ethiopia, which had a catastrophic famine in 1984-85, could face another one after a severe crop failure this year.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
The unexpected death of Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi provides the United States with an opportunity to put greater pressure on his successor to give that nation more than the token democracy its people have had to satisfy themselves with for 21 years. Meles, 57, died Monday in a Belgian hospital of an unknown illness. He had not been seen in his own country for weeks. Deputy Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn was expected to be sworn in Thursday to replace Meles. Military leaders have pledged to defend the constitution as the country makes the transition to new leadership.
TRAVEL
April 28, 2014 | By Kelly J. Collins, For The Inquirer
Twenty-nine years ago, in 1985, I traveled to Mekele, Ethiopia, for a six-month stay under the auspices of an African relief agency to participate in famine relief. It proved to be my most life-changing experience. We lived in Haile Selassie's empty summer castle, commuted by truck to the famine camps, and worked alongside other international groups inoculating, feeding, and hydrating the thousands displaced and affected by the ongoing drought. Life-changing, heartwarming, moving. rewarding only begin to express the experience.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanessa Berhe, 19, is on a mission. It is personal and it is international, involving a country that most Americans know little about. Berhe, a freshman at Villanova University, has been campaigning for years to draw attention to the plight of her uncle, Seyoum Tsehaye, an Eritrean journalist. At age 5, she tried collecting money on his behalf. She knows he was jailed 14 years ago, but isn't even sure that he's still alive. She has produced an online video; founded an organization, One Day Seyoum, seeking Tsehaye's freedom; started a petition drive and website; put the word out on social media; contacted lawyers; filed a writ of habeas corpus with an Eritrean court; demonstrated at the U.N. She has appealed even to the Vatican, and said she received a personal assurance from Pope Francis.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An idea that started in the back of a car in Ethiopia 21/2 years ago culminated Wednesday with a $45 million gift to Drexel University's public health school and a new name: the Dana and David Dornsife School of Public Health. The donation, one of the largest in the university's history and by far the biggest for the public health school, will strengthen Drexel's long-standing commitment to Philadelphia neighborhoods and broaden its global work in urban health. Wednesday's announcement brings the California couple's Drexel gifts to $58 million.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | Inquirer photos by Larry C. Price
Though the hunger emergency continues in Africa, help is arriving at camps in Ethiopia and the Sudan - food and medicine, doctors and nurses - and people are being helped back from the ravages of starvation and disease. Yet a possible resurgence of drought has relief workers worried, and food and water still is being rationed.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, the Washington Post and the New York Times.)
Bob Hope will make his first Christmas trip in four years to entertain U.S. troops when he goes later this month to the Persian Gulf, where American forces are protecting oil shipping. Harry Flynn, a friend of Hope's, said the comedian had suggested the trip Monday "because there's guys out there and far from home. " All he had to do was drop the word. The Pentagon said arrangements are under way. Hope, 84, has made more than 40 such Christmas trips since 1942. The last was to Beirut in 1983.
FOOD
July 27, 2012
Go all coffee geek by roasting your own beans. Fante's sells a variety of unroasted (green) beans from such locales as Costa Rica, Ethiopia, and Brazil. Pop them into a 425-degree oven; 12 minutes results in a medium roast. Let rest overnight, grind, and drink, or make your own blends. - Ashley Primis Brazil Santos unroasted beans, $6.29 per pound at Fante's Kitchen Shop, 1006 S. 9th St., 215-922-5557, fantes.com .
NEWS
March 12, 2009
RE Ms. Melfi's letter on Cole Hamel's plans to adopt a child from Ethiopia: Just wondering how many of these unwanted American babies she's adopted? Why judge someone who chooses to give a child a home and the benefit of having a mother and father? My husband and I are most certainly not celebrities, and we also chose to adopt internationally. Our son Cole (after our favorite left-handed pitcher) is a living miracle and the light of our lives. Stop judging and be supportive and happy for couples who decide to adopt a child - any child.
NEWS
August 8, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 66 years, a revered piece of Ethiopia's cultural heritage sat unmarked in a traffic-clogged Roman plaza. The plundered obelisk of Aksum was a symbol of Italy's failure to make amends with the country it conquered with poison gas and mass killings in an ill-fated effort to build a Fascist colonial empire. And then, in November, after decades of pleading by Ethiopians, the Italian government finally took steps to return the roughly 80-foot-high, 1,700-year-old granite monument to its rightful owners.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanessa Berhe, 19, is on a mission. It is personal and it is international, involving a country that most Americans know little about. Berhe, a freshman at Villanova University, has been campaigning for years to draw attention to the plight of her uncle, Seyoum Tsehaye, an Eritrean journalist. At age 5, she tried collecting money on his behalf. She knows he was jailed 14 years ago, but isn't even sure that he's still alive. She has produced an online video; founded an organization, One Day Seyoum, seeking Tsehaye's freedom; started a petition drive and website; put the word out on social media; contacted lawyers; filed a writ of habeas corpus with an Eritrean court; demonstrated at the U.N. She has appealed even to the Vatican, and said she received a personal assurance from Pope Francis.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1991, the Cape May County freeholders presented the Alice Stokes Paul Award to Maria M. DiGiacomo of Sea Isle City, niece Rita Hill said. Alice Paul, who grew up in Mount Laurel, advocated for the right of women to vote, as enacted in the 19th Amendment. The award recognizes those who have helped raise the status of women in Cape May County. Ms. DiGiacomo was honored for, among her other work, being the first director in 1982 of the Coalition of Women Against Rape and Abuse in Cape May Court House, Hill said.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An idea that started in the back of a car in Ethiopia 21/2 years ago culminated Wednesday with a $45 million gift to Drexel University's public health school and a new name: the Dana and David Dornsife School of Public Health. The donation, one of the largest in the university's history and by far the biggest for the public health school, will strengthen Drexel's long-standing commitment to Philadelphia neighborhoods and broaden its global work in urban health. Wednesday's announcement brings the California couple's Drexel gifts to $58 million.
NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a refugee working to oppose one of the world's most repressive regimes tried to leave, the Eritrean government found him and held him in an underground prison for six years until he escaped. His job at the jail had been to sell the kerosene that inmates buy for cooking. He said he saw some use it to set themselves on fire. "That was one of the first stories we heard," said Chris Cotter, an aspiring filmmaker in West Chester. "It was tough. " Cotter, a 37-year-old musician, is almost done making a documentary - Refugee: The Eritrean Exodus - to share people's stories and raise awareness about human rights abuses in Eritrea, a country slightly larger than Pennsylvania on the Horn of Africa.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Paul Rozin was growing up, his parent thought food waste was terrible, telling him to "finish your food. Think of the starving children in Europe. " The psychology worked. "I would eat my food," he said. Now, Rozin is a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and one of his research areas is food attitudes. He spoke recently at the Last Food Mile, a national conference on food waste sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Food waste happens all along the supply chain, from farms to stores to restaurants, but waste in the American home is the single largest component, with the average family of four discarding an estimated 1,164 pounds of food a year - about three pounds a day. A third of that is inedibles, such as chicken bones and orange peels.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK LUTZ didn't know how to quit. After serving as an educator all over the world - Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Poland - he was teaching cartooning at an adult learning center. In fact, he was preparing a lesson plan for the course when he died June 29 at age 92. He lived in Mount Laurel, N.J. "He would exhaust you and me and five other people," said his son, Barry Lutz. "He didn't sleep. " After 30 years in Africa, and pushing 70, Jack decided to join the Peace Corps and taught college in Poland for several more years.
SPORTS
May 6, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was only last month when Mourad Marofit moved from New York to Philadelphia with some of his Moroccan countrymen to carry out their training at Wissahickon Valley Park. He fell in love with the park's scenery and tree-lined paths almost immediately. Marofit found that same satisfaction Sunday on Broad Street, and despite a record field of 40,000 runners and thousands who lined Philadelphia's main thoroughfare, he turned it into his own solitary path, dominating the 35th annual Blue Cross Broad Street Run for a convincing 45-second victory.
TRAVEL
April 28, 2014 | By Kelly J. Collins, For The Inquirer
Twenty-nine years ago, in 1985, I traveled to Mekele, Ethiopia, for a six-month stay under the auspices of an African relief agency to participate in famine relief. It proved to be my most life-changing experience. We lived in Haile Selassie's empty summer castle, commuted by truck to the famine camps, and worked alongside other international groups inoculating, feeding, and hydrating the thousands displaced and affected by the ongoing drought. Life-changing, heartwarming, moving. rewarding only begin to express the experience.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HENRY PRINCE Murphy was a man of many talents and accomplishments, with a major focus on serving his fellow human being. He was an auditor and accountant by trade, but you wouldn't have wanted to tell him he had condemned himself to a life without adventure, not when he was boarding a plane for Ethiopia to help the Rev. Leon Sullivan set up development projects for Third World countries. And not when he was teaching business courses at local schools, or painting portraits of family members, or working in various civic enterprises to help minority businesses, abused women or any number of other programs of benefit to the underserved.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Kevin L. Carter, For The Inquirer
Hard-driving African music held court Saturday night at World Cafe Live. And though rhythms of Africa and its diaspora dominated the proceedings, drums had very little to do with this domination. Debo Band, from Boston, has gone all in on the Ethiopian pop music of the 1970s, a veritable golden age of creativity in that venerable land. Though other groups, including Either/Orchestra, Debo's Hub homeboys, have done homage to this music, none is as adventurous or unabashedly traditional as Debo.
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