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NEWS
February 25, 2011
The grassroots protests taking place in North Africa and the Middle East appear related to the change that took place in the United States in 2008, when we elected Barack Obama to be our first African American president ("America's needless losses," Thursday). In a free and fair democratic election, the American people elevated a member of a racial minority to the presidency of our nation. This was a sign to the rest of the world of our great respect for people who show an ability to lead, no matter what racial or ethnic background they come from.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former old boys club on 22d Street, replete with majestic columns, marble rotunda, grand staircase, and a beaux arts exterior protected by a wrought-iron gate, is imposing but not impenetrable. At 16, Faith Konate of South Philadelphia already has a foot in the ancient oak door. An 11th grader at Masterman High, Konate is among 24 young people from "under-resourced" neighborhoods who were handpicked for a novel project at the revered College of Physicians, on South 22d Street.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
The threatened breakup of multi-ethnic Yugoslavia is a chilling reminder that the biggest danger to peace in Europe over the next decade is not Soviet invasion, but bloody civil wars. Yugoslavia, the original Balkanized country, is falling apart because, in the post-communist era, the two richest of its six ethnic republics are in a hurry to join the West. Slovenia and Croatia feel held back by the political and economic crises of the other four republics within the Balkan federation that was put together in 1945-6.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Louis Hau, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Smokers beware. A new $7.4 million, state-administered program is out to make you just another statistic. No, this is not a conspiracy to kill you (though some would argue that you are already doing that to yourselves). Instead, the program wants you to join an increasing number of smokers who are living longer - by quitting. The Washington-based National Cancer Institute (NCI) has chosen New Jersey as one of 17 states in the country to be part of an ambitious seven-year anti- smoking campaign.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
For the second straight year, the Goode administration is in trouble with ethnic groups angered by the removal of their national flags from the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Although City Council in September unanimously passed a resolution calling on the city to fly the national flags of Philadelphia's ethnic communities, representatives of some of those groups say their flags have vanished in recent days. Among the banners missing from the display of flags along the Parkway are those of the Ukraine, Armenia and the Vatican.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - As thousands paid their respects this week to a slain northern Afghanistan police commander, a top lawmaker sounded an ominous warning: He and three other minority faction leaders are on a Taliban hit list and could be next. Conflict between the Taliban - who come mostly from the biggest group, the Pashtuns - and members of its ethnic minorities is nothing new in a nation whose history is scarred by civil strife. But rising ethnic tension is jeopardizing efforts to make peace with the Taliban after nearly 10 years of war. Minorities already worry that President Hamid Karzai, a Pashtun, will make too many concessions to their Taliban enemies to shore up his Pashtun base and craft a peace deal.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Ethnic Kachin rebels in Myanmar said clashes in the country's north continued Saturday despite a government promise to cease fire, casting doubt over hopes that the bloody conflict there could end soon. Myanmar's military had declared Friday that it would stop attacks against rebels around the town of Lajayang, near Myanmar's northeastern border with China, starting Saturday morning because it had achieved its goal of securing an army outpost there that had been surrounded by insurgents.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services Daily News staff writer Scott Heimer contributed to this report
The Department of Education has decided to begin prohibiting colleges and universities that receive federal funds from offering scholarships designated for minority students, the New York Times reported today. Michael L. Williams, the Education Department's assistant secretary for civil rights, said yesterday that "race exclusive" scholarships were discriminatory and therefore illegal, the Times said. College administrators and scholarship fund directors reacted with alarm, saying the decision could reverse decades of efforts to increase the enrollment of members of racial and ethnic minorities who have been historically underrepresented in colleges, the newspaper said.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | By Lem Lloyd, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester County Commissioners, meeting in the southern end of the county, had followed their custom of introducing their senior staff to the public when a Lincoln University professor stood up in the audience. "Unless I'm blind," Robert Millette told the commissioners, "I recognized that there wasn't a single African American person" among the county government department heads introduced. Well, said the county commissioners, making our workforce more diverse is certainly one of our priorities.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | By Karin Braedt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alonso, one of the richest men in Puerto Callente, Argentina, has everything money can buy, except Victoria, the woman he loves. He is struggling to get Victoria to become his wife, but it will not be easy for him. So goes the plot of Amo Y Senor (The Lord Master), one of the telenovelas, or soap operas, aired in many Spanish-speaking countries. Now, Spanish- speaking people in Camden, Burlington and Mercer Counties can watch Amo Y Senor in their homes. In April, TKR Hamilton and TKR Shade/Gloucester Cable systems started up WTGI-TV 61, the only station in the Philadelphia area - and one of the few in the country - to air a mix of ethnic programming, including Spanish-language telenovelas, news and sports shows.
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NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Ethnic Kachin rebels in Myanmar said clashes in the country's north continued Saturday despite a government promise to cease fire, casting doubt over hopes that the bloody conflict there could end soon. Myanmar's military had declared Friday that it would stop attacks against rebels around the town of Lajayang, near Myanmar's northeastern border with China, starting Saturday morning because it had achieved its goal of securing an army outpost there that had been surrounded by insurgents.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - As thousands paid their respects this week to a slain northern Afghanistan police commander, a top lawmaker sounded an ominous warning: He and three other minority faction leaders are on a Taliban hit list and could be next. Conflict between the Taliban - who come mostly from the biggest group, the Pashtuns - and members of its ethnic minorities is nothing new in a nation whose history is scarred by civil strife. But rising ethnic tension is jeopardizing efforts to make peace with the Taliban after nearly 10 years of war. Minorities already worry that President Hamid Karzai, a Pashtun, will make too many concessions to their Taliban enemies to shore up his Pashtun base and craft a peace deal.
NEWS
February 25, 2011
The grassroots protests taking place in North Africa and the Middle East appear related to the change that took place in the United States in 2008, when we elected Barack Obama to be our first African American president ("America's needless losses," Thursday). In a free and fair democratic election, the American people elevated a member of a racial minority to the presidency of our nation. This was a sign to the rest of the world of our great respect for people who show an ability to lead, no matter what racial or ethnic background they come from.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former old boys club on 22d Street, replete with majestic columns, marble rotunda, grand staircase, and a beaux arts exterior protected by a wrought-iron gate, is imposing but not impenetrable. At 16, Faith Konate of South Philadelphia already has a foot in the ancient oak door. An 11th grader at Masterman High, Konate is among 24 young people from "under-resourced" neighborhoods who were handpicked for a novel project at the revered College of Physicians, on South 22d Street.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The needs of African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and other minorities are overlooked when it comes to planning for public-health emergencies, a new report has found. The national study, issued by a team of Drexel University researchers, said that in the last 30 years, racial and ethnic minorities figured in programs and materials related to disaster planning just 10 percent of the time. If unaddressed, this lapse could have a profound effect on the Philadelphia suburbs, where diverse populations live and work in increasing numbers, the study's lead author says.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
A report on the CIA's failings before the Sept. 11 attacks has ignited a new round of finger-pointing. But that shouldn't be allowed to sidetrack its counterterrorism efforts. The report, completed in 2005 but released this week, is mostly aimed at former CIA Director George J. Tenet. The spy agency's inspector general said Tenet didn't have a comprehensive plan to combat al-Qaeda and could have done more to prevent the attacks. Tenet, who stepped down in 2004, has countered that the report is "flat wrong.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE NEW African and African-American history requirement in Philadelphia public high schools will almost certainly end up on "The Daily Show. " The effort lends itself to parody and bears the burden of foolish precedents. But at the risk of being parodied myself in all the obvious ways, I'm for the requirement. First the disclosure. My children go to private school and will not be subject to it. But, as I've said before in this column, democracy is all about speaking on other people's issues - it's unavoidable.
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They walked two miles under the midday sun - past Rita's Water Ice, past pizza and hoagie shops, through a landscape of brick houses, tamed front yards, and street signs in a foreign script. "Rhawn. " A right here. "I need my car," joked Alibek Lomidze, who had just been turned away from the first day of classes at Northeast High. "Bradford. " A left here. It was not the first time the 18-year-old, his family or his ancestors had had to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
NEWS
September 16, 2004 | By Nancy Merle
For Americans, access to adequate health care, preventive or otherwise, often is directly related to economic status, race or ethnicity, gender, education, disability, geographic location or sexual orientation. To eliminate disparities, the health-care community must make a more concerted effort to increase awareness of these differences - and increase cultural sensitivity - among the general public, health-care providers, insurance companies and policymakers. Unfortunately, racial and ethnic minorities tend to receive lower-quality health care even when insurance, income, age, and severity of conditions are considered.
NEWS
May 12, 2004 | By Pamela Bryer
Over the last century, advances in medical science have led to substantial improvements in the nation's health. Despite this, the health of minorities still lags behind that of white residents. African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives are more likely to have poor health and to die prematurely. Minorities suffer disproportionately from many illnesses, even when differences in income are removed. This is especially significant because minorities now compose about 28 percent of the nation's population, a figure that is expected to grow to 40 percent by 2030.
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