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Eugene Ormandy

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NEWS
June 25, 2012
      1. b. 1900. 2. d. Fritz Scheel, 1900-07. 3. c. Yannick Nexet-Seguin. 4. a. London. 5. c. Eighth. 6. b. Camden. 7. d. Summer residency in Saratoga, started in 1966, under Eugene Ormandy. 8. a. The Big Broadcast of 1937. 9. b. Montreal Symphony. 10. c. 1960.  
NEWS
January 18, 2016
Early one morning, David Bowie opened the gate and went out into the big world of orchestral music, and, in a single half-hour recording, bagged a triumph. Bowie's narration of Peter and the Wolf with the Philadelphia Orchestra released in 1978 hardly represents the first or last handshake over this piece between classical long-hairs and pop stars. In hopes of finding a larger following, classical music often has looked to Prokofiev's 1936 work, inviting pop culture, show business, and political names of the day to do the narration.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Marcel Farago, 92, a Philadelphia Orchestra cellist from 1955 to 1994, died Friday, April 8, in Cherry Hill. Born in Romania, he was also a composer of numerous works, several of which were performed by the orchestra. Mr. Farago reportedly suffered from cancer but chose not to discuss it, and gave an interview packed with keen observations and lively wit only weeks before his death. He proudly stated that he was born in Timisoara, near the birthplace of the great Hungarian composer Bela Bartok.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Samuel Barber's warmblooded Violin Concerto does not in general lack for performances or recordings. But it has not been heard at the Academy of Music since its premiere by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy in 1941, with violinist Albert Spalding. Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg performs the concerto tonight, tomorrow and Tuesday under Riccardo Muti's direction. Rounding out this weekend's subscription program are Prokofiev's "Classical" Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4. Philadelphia Orchestra, Riccardo Muti directing, at the Academy of Music, Broad & Locust Streets, tonight at 8, tomorrow and Tue. Tickets: $10-$60; $5 student tickets available with ID one-half hour before Mon-Thu subscription concerts; $2.50 unreserved amphitheater seats on sale one hour before Fri-Sat concerts.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Marilyn Costello, 72, a harp prodigy who infused Philadelphia Orchestra performances with elegance and virtuosity for more than a generation, died of cancer Monday at her Rittenhouse Square apartment. In 47 years with the orchestra, 46 of them as principal, she appeared frequently as soloist. Audiences could identify her sound without having to look at the stage, for her playing was somehow operatic. Her playing combined urgency, rich and eloquent sound, and the passion of opera, but in French repertoire, sounded through mists of atmospheric subtlety.
NEWS
May 15, 2010
For Ormandy, red roses and remembrance Once a year, on May 15, a dozen red roses appear on the grave of Eugene Ormandy in the churchyard of Old Pine Street Presbyterian. The roses are no mystery, but to the question of why the remains of the Philadelphia Orchestra's fourth music director, a Jew, reside in the cemetery of a Presbyterian church, the answer is not so clear. What happened was this: When Ormandy was dying, his physician was Edward Viner, who was friends with Bill Pindar, pastor of the church.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gretel Ormandy, 89, widow of longtime Philadelphia Orchestra music director Eugene Ormandy and the orchestra's "Queen Mother," died Sunday evening at her Rittenhouse Square home after a long illness. Mrs. Ormandy suffered a stroke in November 1993 and had been confined to a wheelchair. "She was very kind and gracious," said Silvia Mann, widow of orchestra benefactor and industrialist Fredric R. Mann and a friend of Mrs. Ormandy's for more than 50 years. "And, of course, she was a wonderful wife to him. She did everything - packed and unpacked, dressed and undressed him. He didn't have to think about anything except his music.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Joseph Lanza, 73, of Cherry Hill, a member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1958 and its longtime assistant principal second violinist, died early Saturday morning at home. He had suffered briefly from pneumonia, his wife said. Mr. Lanza, born in a South Philadelphia rowhouse and schooled at the Juilliard School in New York, was one of those orchestra musicians who hated missing work, and even last week resisted staying home despite illness. His last time playing with the orchestra was Wednesday, in rehearsal.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
The term Philadelphia Sound conjures for many the lush arrangements and piercing horns of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff tunes from the 1970s. For fans of classical music, however, the silky strings of the Philadelphia Orchestra define the city's namesake sound. Consider the story of the man who did much to perfect it: Eugene Ormandy. Born Jeno Blau in Budapest, Ormandy (1899-1985) was given a tiny fiddle at age 3. Two years later, he enrolled as a violinist in the Hungarian capital's Royal State Academy of Music before becoming its youngest graduate, at age 14. Ormandy arrived in the United States in 1921, lured by the prospect of a $30,000 concert tour.
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NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Like internet-based companies whose central headquarters are little more than a mailing address, classical music ensembles increasingly exist in many places at once. And that raises the question: What makes an ensemble authentically "local"? Are the early-music groups Tempesta di Mare and Piffaro the Renaissance Band less local because some of their regular members don't live here? Is the choral group Seraphic Fire, based in Florida, "local" now that it performs periodically in Philadelphia?
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Marcel Farago, 92, a Philadelphia Orchestra cellist from 1955 to 1994, died Friday, April 8, in Cherry Hill. Born in Romania, he was also a composer of numerous works, several of which were performed by the orchestra. Mr. Farago reportedly suffered from cancer but chose not to discuss it, and gave an interview packed with keen observations and lively wit only weeks before his death. He proudly stated that he was born in Timisoara, near the birthplace of the great Hungarian composer Bela Bartok.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
The term Philadelphia Sound conjures for many the lush arrangements and piercing horns of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff tunes from the 1970s. For fans of classical music, however, the silky strings of the Philadelphia Orchestra define the city's namesake sound. Consider the story of the man who did much to perfect it: Eugene Ormandy. Born Jeno Blau in Budapest, Ormandy (1899-1985) was given a tiny fiddle at age 3. Two years later, he enrolled as a violinist in the Hungarian capital's Royal State Academy of Music before becoming its youngest graduate, at age 14. Ormandy arrived in the United States in 1921, lured by the prospect of a $30,000 concert tour.
NEWS
January 18, 2016
Early one morning, David Bowie opened the gate and went out into the big world of orchestral music, and, in a single half-hour recording, bagged a triumph. Bowie's narration of Peter and the Wolf with the Philadelphia Orchestra released in 1978 hardly represents the first or last handshake over this piece between classical long-hairs and pop stars. In hopes of finding a larger following, classical music often has looked to Prokofiev's 1936 work, inviting pop culture, show business, and political names of the day to do the narration.
NEWS
September 29, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
All else seemed but an earthly prologue by Sunday afternoon's massive outdoor papal Mass on the Parkway. The logistical hurdles, pope tchotchkes silly and sincere, the queasy police-state feeling that gripped the city starting Friday - all was set aside as the Philadelphia Orchestra and a chorus of about 500 laid down a soundtrack of contemplation and triumph for an in-person and online audience of perhaps a million or more. The orchestra, led by music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, played Beethoven and Brahms as the papal motorcade arrived at Eakins Oval with the Philadelphia Museum of Art the backdrop, and a canopy of cool gray skies over the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The program could easily be titled Tortured Beginnings. Khachaturian's Piano Concerto went so badly that the composer was found after the premiere hugging a birch tree while weeping. Rachmaninoff fled from the badly played premiere of his Symphony No. 1 with plugged ears. When both works arrived Wednesday in the Philadelphia Orchestra's Kimmel Center concert, you could understand how awful things happen to such good pieces. Rachmaninoff didn't yet know how best to sequence his musical ideas.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
To help lead the increasingly populist aspects of its repertoire, guest artists, and collaborations, the Philadelphia Orchestra is restocking its roster of conductors. Stéphane Denève, the ebullient French conductor of the corkscrew locks who has been a frequent visitor to the orchestra's podium, will become principal guest conductor in the fall. Romanian-born Cristian Macelaru, the orchestra's associate conductor, will take the upgraded title of conductor in residence. Denève, under the terms of a contract running through 2016-17, will conduct at least two weeks during the main subscription season, as well as family concerts, dates at the orchestra's summer spots in Vail, Colo., and Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and, possibly, on tour.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. BEIJING - The two concertmasters bowed together Thursday, the Philadelphia Orchestra's David Kim ceding the first-desk seat to the China National Symphony's Yunzhi Liu. Though the collaboration at the National Center for the Performing Arts (known as the Egg, a reference to its glass and titanium dome)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If notes on staves were New Year's greetings, the Philadelphia Orchestra would have sailed a sheaf of good wishes out into Verizon Hall Monday night. At what he told a sold-out crowd was "the biggest party in town," Yannick Nézet-Séguin led a program that, Janus-like, glanced back at a year of "great moments and maybe not-so-great moments," but looked forward, too. Everyone knew what he meant. Never uttered was the word bankruptcy , but by forming a first half of the program with Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and music from Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier , the orchestra's music director put sound to his aspirations, and, it's hoped, the city's as well.
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