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Eugene Ormandy

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NEWS
June 25, 2012
      1. b. 1900. 2. d. Fritz Scheel, 1900-07. 3. c. Yannick Nexet-Seguin. 4. a. London. 5. c. Eighth. 6. b. Camden. 7. d. Summer residency in Saratoga, started in 1966, under Eugene Ormandy. 8. a. The Big Broadcast of 1937. 9. b. Montreal Symphony. 10. c. 1960.  
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Samuel Barber's warmblooded Violin Concerto does not in general lack for performances or recordings. But it has not been heard at the Academy of Music since its premiere by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy in 1941, with violinist Albert Spalding. Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg performs the concerto tonight, tomorrow and Tuesday under Riccardo Muti's direction. Rounding out this weekend's subscription program are Prokofiev's "Classical" Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4. Philadelphia Orchestra, Riccardo Muti directing, at the Academy of Music, Broad & Locust Streets, tonight at 8, tomorrow and Tue. Tickets: $10-$60; $5 student tickets available with ID one-half hour before Mon-Thu subscription concerts; $2.50 unreserved amphitheater seats on sale one hour before Fri-Sat concerts.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Marilyn Costello, 72, a harp prodigy who infused Philadelphia Orchestra performances with elegance and virtuosity for more than a generation, died of cancer Monday at her Rittenhouse Square apartment. In 47 years with the orchestra, 46 of them as principal, she appeared frequently as soloist. Audiences could identify her sound without having to look at the stage, for her playing was somehow operatic. Her playing combined urgency, rich and eloquent sound, and the passion of opera, but in French repertoire, sounded through mists of atmospheric subtlety.
NEWS
May 15, 2010
For Ormandy, red roses and remembrance Once a year, on May 15, a dozen red roses appear on the grave of Eugene Ormandy in the churchyard of Old Pine Street Presbyterian. The roses are no mystery, but to the question of why the remains of the Philadelphia Orchestra's fourth music director, a Jew, reside in the cemetery of a Presbyterian church, the answer is not so clear. What happened was this: When Ormandy was dying, his physician was Edward Viner, who was friends with Bill Pindar, pastor of the church.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gretel Ormandy, 89, widow of longtime Philadelphia Orchestra music director Eugene Ormandy and the orchestra's "Queen Mother," died Sunday evening at her Rittenhouse Square home after a long illness. Mrs. Ormandy suffered a stroke in November 1993 and had been confined to a wheelchair. "She was very kind and gracious," said Silvia Mann, widow of orchestra benefactor and industrialist Fredric R. Mann and a friend of Mrs. Ormandy's for more than 50 years. "And, of course, she was a wonderful wife to him. She did everything - packed and unpacked, dressed and undressed him. He didn't have to think about anything except his music.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Joseph Lanza, 73, of Cherry Hill, a member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1958 and its longtime assistant principal second violinist, died early Saturday morning at home. He had suffered briefly from pneumonia, his wife said. Mr. Lanza, born in a South Philadelphia rowhouse and schooled at the Juilliard School in New York, was one of those orchestra musicians who hated missing work, and even last week resisted staying home despite illness. His last time playing with the orchestra was Wednesday, in rehearsal.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Mayes, 73, a former first cellist with the Philadelphia Orchestra and one of the premier cellists in the United States, died Friday at his home in Mesa, Ariz. Mr. Mayes, whose father was a St. Louis surgeon and whose mother was a musician, began playing the cello at age 4 and demonstrated extraordinary talent. At age 8, he performed as a soloist with the St. Louis Symphony. His first teacher was Bruno Steindel, the principal cellist for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Mayes entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia at age 12. In 1936, at age 18, he was named by Leopold Stokowski, the famed conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, as alternate solo cellist for the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Sentiment. That's the reason Van Cliburn gives for ending his 11-year hiatus from the concert stage. It is not a need to perform, not an unendurable ache at no longer probing the keyboard for the essence of music, not an emptiness at having given up his part of the communicative process that involves performer, composer and audience. It is sentiment, he says, and reason enough to leave his mansion in Fort Worth, Texas, to play with the Philadelphia Orchestra tomorrow at the Mann Music Center.
NEWS
July 25, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Ah, that's more like it. Such was the reaction in the opening moments of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 4 Wednesday at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. The problematic concerto seemed curiously stillborn last season, when the Philadelphia Orchestra hosted guest pianist Horacio Gutierrez. You even had to doubt the concerto's value. However, Garrick Ohlsson, Wednesday's soloist, has made a specialty of the 1941 piece, and you immediately knew why. No matter how interpreted, the music might always seem to be an uneasy update of the composer's vocabulary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The program could easily be titled Tortured Beginnings. Khachaturian's Piano Concerto went so badly that the composer was found after the premiere hugging a birch tree while weeping. Rachmaninoff fled from the badly played premiere of his Symphony No. 1 with plugged ears. When both works arrived Wednesday in the Philadelphia Orchestra's Kimmel Center concert, you could understand how awful things happen to such good pieces. Rachmaninoff didn't yet know how best to sequence his musical ideas.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
To help lead the increasingly populist aspects of its repertoire, guest artists, and collaborations, the Philadelphia Orchestra is restocking its roster of conductors. Stéphane Denève, the ebullient French conductor of the corkscrew locks who has been a frequent visitor to the orchestra's podium, will become principal guest conductor in the fall. Romanian-born Cristian Macelaru, the orchestra's associate conductor, will take the upgraded title of conductor in residence. Denève, under the terms of a contract running through 2016-17, will conduct at least two weeks during the main subscription season, as well as family concerts, dates at the orchestra's summer spots in Vail, Colo., and Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and, possibly, on tour.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. BEIJING - The two concertmasters bowed together Thursday, the Philadelphia Orchestra's David Kim ceding the first-desk seat to the China National Symphony's Yunzhi Liu. Though the collaboration at the National Center for the Performing Arts (known as the Egg, a reference to its glass and titanium dome)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If notes on staves were New Year's greetings, the Philadelphia Orchestra would have sailed a sheaf of good wishes out into Verizon Hall Monday night. At what he told a sold-out crowd was "the biggest party in town," Yannick Nézet-Séguin led a program that, Janus-like, glanced back at a year of "great moments and maybe not-so-great moments," but looked forward, too. Everyone knew what he meant. Never uttered was the word bankruptcy , but by forming a first half of the program with Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and music from Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier , the orchestra's music director put sound to his aspirations, and, it's hoped, the city's as well.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
      1. b. 1900. 2. d. Fritz Scheel, 1900-07. 3. c. Yannick Nexet-Seguin. 4. a. London. 5. c. Eighth. 6. b. Camden. 7. d. Summer residency in Saratoga, started in 1966, under Eugene Ormandy. 8. a. The Big Broadcast of 1937. 9. b. Montreal Symphony. 10. c. 1960.  
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Eugene Ormandy may be fidgeting in his grave. He spent 41 years in front of the Philadelphia Orchestra cultivating a lush, voluptuous standard of Rachmaninoff performances, and now guest conductor Jaap van Zweden arrives this week to conduct Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 with polar-opposite ideas. His past performance (with Chicago) had lean sonorities, nervous rhythms, and a conspicuous lack of emotional extravagance - all qualities that have made van Zweden a bracing breath of Dutch air among the numerous American orchestras he now conducts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - Conductors at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center apparently hold titanic powers in their hands. Eugene Ormandy, bothered by the overenthusiastic obbligato of a stream not far from the stage where he was leading his Philadelphia Orchestra, once ordered the waters dammed up for his Beethoven and Bartók. Charles Dutoit, who exited this venue Thursday night after 21 years as chief of all things orchestral, never exhibited the power to quell nature. But his tenure exceeded Ormandy's by years.
NEWS
May 15, 2010
For Ormandy, red roses and remembrance Once a year, on May 15, a dozen red roses appear on the grave of Eugene Ormandy in the churchyard of Old Pine Street Presbyterian. The roses are no mystery, but to the question of why the remains of the Philadelphia Orchestra's fourth music director, a Jew, reside in the cemetery of a Presbyterian church, the answer is not so clear. What happened was this: When Ormandy was dying, his physician was Edward Viner, who was friends with Bill Pindar, pastor of the church.
NEWS
January 3, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Murphy, 74, an educator and a singer whom Eugene Ormandy called "Philadelphia's greatest bass-baritone," died of cancer Dec. 24 at Willow Valley Manor in Lancaster. In the early 1960s, Mr. Murphy seemed destined for international opera stardom. He studied voice in New York with famed instructor Beverly Johnson and received rave reviews for his Papageno in the Washington National Opera's production of The Magic Flute. He worked with Igor Stravinsky and recorded two works with the composer, Renard and The Nightingale.
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