CollectionsEunice Kennedy Shriver
IN THE NEWS

Eunice Kennedy Shriver

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Arnold Schwarzenegger holds a newly minted commemorative silver dollar bearing the likeness of his mother-in-law, Eunice Kennedy Shriver. She became the first living woman to be honored on U.S. legal tender. It was for her work with Special Olympics International. Also at the ceremony at the U.S. Mint in Center City were (from left) Schwarzenegger's wife, Maria Shriver; Eunice Kennedy Shriver; and Mark Shriver.
NEWS
January 22, 2011
There are many iconic figures associated with the 1960s. But perhaps no one played as understated yet lasting role in the idealistic times of that turbulent decade than R. Sargent Shriver. Shriver was the founding director of the Peace Corps, which was the brainchild of his brother-in-law, President John F. Kennedy. Later, Shriver became the architect of President Lyndon B. Johnson's "war on poverty. " Out of that effort came effective antipoverty programs that are still around today, including Head Start, Job Corps, Volunteers in Service to America, the Community Action Program, and the Legal Services Corp.
NEWS
August 12, 2009
Eunice Kennedy Shriver could've coasted through life on her family name, enjoying the perks and privilege that come with being the daughter of a wealthy U.S. ambassador to England, sister of one president and two senators, the wife of a vice presidential candidate and Peace Corps director, and the mother-in-law to California's governor. Instead, her inspiration and life's work came from one of the least known members of the storied Kennedy clan, her older sister Rosemary, who was born mildly retarded in 1918, about a year after John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
For a long time, a number of the organizations associated with assisting the disabled managed to avoid criticism from the recipients of their charitable good works. But times are changing, and handicapped people are questioning the motives, tactics and operations of some of the better known institutions working with the handicapped. Not too many people I know have anything negative to say about the Special Olympics. This organization, founded two decades ago by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, is one of the leading athletic exhibitions for mentally and physically disabled competitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999 | By W. Speers By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay Leno the car collector sure knows a lemon when he sees one. The Tonight Show host was presiding over a Petersen Automotive Museum auction in Los Angeles Thursday when bidding opened for the privilege of dinner with museum director Ken Gross. Leno decided that that wouldn't be much of a moneymaker. "How much will you pay not to have dinner with Ken Gross?" Leno asked the crowd of 1,300 at the museum gala. The audience immediately surged to the podium with $20 bills, which were collected by Gross himself.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer The Washington Post, USA Today and the Daily News wire services contributed to this report
When does a buck cost $35? When it's got Eunice Kennedy Shriver's face on it, drawn by Jamie Wyeth, son of Andrew. Shriver, a founder of the Special Olympics, will be the first living woman to be honored with a commemorative silver dollar. Previous female honorees included Susan B. Anthony, Queen Isabella of Spain, and Virginia and Ellinor Dare, who were on a 1937 coin commemorating the lost colony of Roanoke, N.C. While only 800,000 will be minted, with some of the proceeds benefiting the Special Olympics, not everyone in the coin world is delighted that Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin overruled a citizens advisory committee that opposed the choice of Shriver.
NEWS
March 21, 2009 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
WASHINGTON - President Obama's appearance on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno attracted the largest audience to NBC's late-night program in more than four years. Unfortunately for the president, that meant a lot of people also heard him make a wisecrack about the Special Olympics that was criticized as insensitive and prompted the White House to swiftly apologize. His gaffe came toward the end of the interview Thursday, when Leno ribbed Obama about his poor bowling skills, derided on the campaign trail.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Gordon, 67, of Bala Cynwyd, a towel boy for the Eagles in the 1960s and a champion in Special Olympics, died Tuesday, Feb. 5, of a spinal-cord ailment at his home. Mr. Gordon, who had Down syndrome, was a favorite of Eagles players and coaches. In 1966, at age 20, he was invited to be a towel boy by then-owner Jerry Wolman and team vice president Ed Snider, who at that time was Mr. Gordon's brother-in-law. He held that position for about five years, said his sister Myrna Snider Thomas.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY MAURA CASEY
During my first visit to the John F. Kennedy Library in Dorchester, Mass., a few years ago, the guide provided an unforgettable moment when he paused before a large picture of the Kennedy clan. The picture shows the Kennedys lined up, all flashing that famous smile, right down to little Ted at the end of the row. The tour guide paused, dramatically, and proceeded to name only five of the 11 people in the picture: Joe Sr., Joe Jr., John, Robert and Ted. Then he led the tour elsewhere.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside the historic red-brick church where she was baptized more than a century ago, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy was honored yesterday by family and friends as a woman of quiet strength and deeply tested faith. "Every life is a mixture of joys and sorrows. In that, her life was ordinary," said Cardinal Bernard Law, who presided at the formal Mass of Resurrection. "Few lives, however, have been so intertwined with the joys and sorrows of the nation. Her joys have been moments of triumph for millions.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Gordon, 67, of Bala Cynwyd, a towel boy for the Eagles in the 1960s and a champion in Special Olympics, died Tuesday, Feb. 5, of a spinal-cord ailment at his home. Mr. Gordon, who had Down syndrome, was a favorite of Eagles players and coaches. In 1966, at age 20, he was invited to be a towel boy by then-owner Jerry Wolman and team vice president Ed Snider, who at that time was Mr. Gordon's brother-in-law. He held that position for about five years, said his sister Myrna Snider Thomas.
NEWS
January 22, 2011
There are many iconic figures associated with the 1960s. But perhaps no one played as understated yet lasting role in the idealistic times of that turbulent decade than R. Sargent Shriver. Shriver was the founding director of the Peace Corps, which was the brainchild of his brother-in-law, President John F. Kennedy. Later, Shriver became the architect of President Lyndon B. Johnson's "war on poverty. " Out of that effort came effective antipoverty programs that are still around today, including Head Start, Job Corps, Volunteers in Service to America, the Community Action Program, and the Legal Services Corp.
NEWS
August 12, 2009
Eunice Kennedy Shriver could've coasted through life on her family name, enjoying the perks and privilege that come with being the daughter of a wealthy U.S. ambassador to England, sister of one president and two senators, the wife of a vice presidential candidate and Peace Corps director, and the mother-in-law to California's governor. Instead, her inspiration and life's work came from one of the least known members of the storied Kennedy clan, her older sister Rosemary, who was born mildly retarded in 1918, about a year after John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
March 21, 2009 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
WASHINGTON - President Obama's appearance on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno attracted the largest audience to NBC's late-night program in more than four years. Unfortunately for the president, that meant a lot of people also heard him make a wisecrack about the Special Olympics that was criticized as insensitive and prompted the White House to swiftly apologize. His gaffe came toward the end of the interview Thursday, when Leno ribbed Obama about his poor bowling skills, derided on the campaign trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999 | By W. Speers By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay Leno the car collector sure knows a lemon when he sees one. The Tonight Show host was presiding over a Petersen Automotive Museum auction in Los Angeles Thursday when bidding opened for the privilege of dinner with museum director Ken Gross. Leno decided that that wouldn't be much of a moneymaker. "How much will you pay not to have dinner with Ken Gross?" Leno asked the crowd of 1,300 at the museum gala. The audience immediately surged to the podium with $20 bills, which were collected by Gross himself.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Arnold Schwarzenegger holds a newly minted commemorative silver dollar bearing the likeness of his mother-in-law, Eunice Kennedy Shriver. She became the first living woman to be honored on U.S. legal tender. It was for her work with Special Olympics International. Also at the ceremony at the U.S. Mint in Center City were (from left) Schwarzenegger's wife, Maria Shriver; Eunice Kennedy Shriver; and Mark Shriver.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer The Washington Post, USA Today and the Daily News wire services contributed to this report
When does a buck cost $35? When it's got Eunice Kennedy Shriver's face on it, drawn by Jamie Wyeth, son of Andrew. Shriver, a founder of the Special Olympics, will be the first living woman to be honored with a commemorative silver dollar. Previous female honorees included Susan B. Anthony, Queen Isabella of Spain, and Virginia and Ellinor Dare, who were on a 1937 coin commemorating the lost colony of Roanoke, N.C. While only 800,000 will be minted, with some of the proceeds benefiting the Special Olympics, not everyone in the coin world is delighted that Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin overruled a citizens advisory committee that opposed the choice of Shriver.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY MAURA CASEY
During my first visit to the John F. Kennedy Library in Dorchester, Mass., a few years ago, the guide provided an unforgettable moment when he paused before a large picture of the Kennedy clan. The picture shows the Kennedys lined up, all flashing that famous smile, right down to little Ted at the end of the row. The tour guide paused, dramatically, and proceeded to name only five of the 11 people in the picture: Joe Sr., Joe Jr., John, Robert and Ted. Then he led the tour elsewhere.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside the historic red-brick church where she was baptized more than a century ago, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy was honored yesterday by family and friends as a woman of quiet strength and deeply tested faith. "Every life is a mixture of joys and sorrows. In that, her life was ordinary," said Cardinal Bernard Law, who presided at the formal Mass of Resurrection. "Few lives, however, have been so intertwined with the joys and sorrows of the nation. Her joys have been moments of triumph for millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Children?" Maria Shriver giggles. "You sound like my mother. " OK, OK. So the question is not the kind a serious newsman asks a serious newswoman. But so what? All the truly serious stuff has already been asked and answered. And since Shriver doesn't have to catch a plane for home (Los Angeles) and husband (Arnold Schwarzenegger) for another half-hour, why not pry into her personal life? Thirty minutes ago, Shriver was wearing the pleasant veneer of the anchorwoman you see each week on NBC's Sunday Today show (Channel 3, 8-9:30 a.m.)
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|