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BUSINESS
August 10, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - Europe's biggest economies are showing weakness, a sign that the struggles of their heavily indebted neighbors are spreading. The central banks of France and Britain, Europe's second- and third-largest economies, made grim forecasts on Wednesday, while data from Germany, its largest economy, showed a weakening in manufacturing. Europe - including the 17 countries that use the euro - has struggled for three years as economies face deepening recessions. Spain and Italy are threatened with a financial collapse and could soon join Greece, Portugal, Ireland, and Cyprus in seeking financial assistance.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Worries about Europe's economic and debt problems yesterday sent stocks to their first loss in four days. The major indexes bounced up and down in another volatile day. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 120 points in the first half-hour of trading after a report showed that Germany's economy stalled last quarter and dragged down growth for Europe. The Dow recovered and had a slight advance at midday, but resumed its drop after the leaders of France and Germany tried to calm worries about Europe's debt problems by pushing for long-term political solutions.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
PENN, TEMPLE and Saint Joseph's could have a mini City Series round-robin this summer in Europe, if NCAA rules allowed such things. The basketball teams of all three schools will be taking a European tour before heading home for the fall semester. Penn's team will be in Italy from Aug. 15 to 23. The Quakers will be in Venice, Florence and Rome. They have four games scheduled. "It is one thing to compete in a foreign setting," Penn coach Jerome Allen said. "However, the larger piece of this trip involves showing our players that, especially in this day and age, we are all citizens of the world.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What a strange time the 1930s must have been. The world was hurtling toward a cataclysm of unimaginable proportions, yet there was a stunning flowering of the arts, of hope and of new ideas in the West as painters and philosophers, poets, and musicians congregated in New York and London, in Paris and Berlin. That's the world so vividly captured by the brilliant British playwright and screenwriter Stephen Poliakoff ( The Lost Prince ) in Dancing on the Edge , a grand ensemble drama with a stunning cast that includes Chiwetel Ejiofor, Janet Montgomery, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Head, John Goodman, Matthew Goode, and Angel Coulby.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Everything I Like, a restless and pictorially ravishing feature by Martin Sulik, our Slovakian hero, Thomas, has recently separated from his wife much in the way his country has separated from the Czech Republic. His first instinct is to flirt with the West - in the form of his English teacher. A parable of man and nation struggling for identity, Everything I Like follows Thomas through tense encounters with his ex-wife, guilt-ridden episodes with his son, and sexual adventures with his mistress, finally revealing how his odd odyssey adds up to a world view.
TRAVEL
July 29, 2013 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
When I was 18, I wrote a postcard to my grandmother from Austria, describing how I slept for free on the porch of a hostel in Innsbruck. While I wouldn't do that now, it's fun to reminisce about my backpacking days. Bars were inundated with smoke, currency changes were required after each border crossing, and it took about nine hours to travel from London to Paris. Despite the changes, the adventure and thrills of good old-fashioned vagabonding survive. One of the most amazing changes over the last decade is the speed and ease with which you can get around.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
US Airways is adding flights to Europe from Philadelphia for the busy summer travel season, the airline said Wednesday. Seasonal flights will operate to Barcelona, Frankfurt, Venice, Lisbon, Athens, Glasgow and, for two weeks in July, to Dublin. Additional seasonal flights are also being added from Charlotte, the airline said. — Paul Nussbaum
SPORTS
August 1, 2014
TWO FORMER Villanova guards have signed to play for teams in Europe. For Roman Catholic High's Maalik Wayns, this will be the first time he's taking his game overseas. Allan Ray, who as a senior was part of the Wildcats' 2005-06 Final Eight run, is making his eighth stop in six seasons (he sat out in 2009-10 with a knee injury). Wayns, who left college a year early and spent part of the last two seasons in the NBA with the Sixers and Los Angeles Clippers, will be suiting up for EuroLeague power BC Zalgiris, which is based in Kaunas, Lithuania.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2011 | Associated Press
A deal to forge stronger ties among most of Europe's economies sent stocks sharply higher Friday as hopes grew that the region was close to resolving its debt crisis. The Dow closed up 186.56 points, or 1.6 percent, at 12,184.26. It is up 1.4 percent for the week. Bank stocks led the market higher, reflecting traders' optimism about Europe's progress toward solving its crisis. Citigroup Inc. rose 3.7 percent, Morgan Stanley 3.2 percent and JPMorgan Chase & Co. 3 percent. Banks have been weighed down for months by fears about their exposure to Europe.
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Players from the United States and Canada took a 3-1 lead against Europe in the seventh Senior Women's Invitation Match yesterday on the East Course of Merion Golf Club. The competition was four match-play foursomes (alternate drive and alternate stroke), and the North America team won three of the four matches. The event concludes today with eight match-play singles. The North America team has been victorious in all six previous meetings. Yesterday, Dottie Porter, of Riverton Country Club and U.S. Amateur champion in 1949, teamed with Marlene Streit of Canada, former Canadian Open and British Ladies Amateur champion, for a 2 and 1 victory in the No. 2 match against Belle Robertson of Scotland and Claudine Rubin-Chatrier of France.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Howard Gensler, Daily News Staff Writer
Art of Dixie? The  Dixie Chicks , Tattle's favorite country trio, is returning to Europe for their first headlining tour since lead singer and Texan  Natalie Maines  said during the  George W. Bush  administration, "We're ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas. " The line went over well in London, but the Chicks got hammered on American country radio, they took flak for being un-American, CDs were destroyed, concert dates were canceled and the threesome made only one more (albeit great)
SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
REDSHIRTING is a common practice for college athletes, especially football players. Theoretically, the idea is to give freshmen a year to adjust to college life before throwing in the additional pressures of being an athlete. That they get a free year to physically develop is an important side issue. There are other reasons for redshirting, most often serious injury, and the first recognized case dates back to the University of Nebraska in 1937. Still, while redshirting is declining as more true freshmen are playing, a new phenomena involving the practice appears to be growing popularity.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
After Asia, the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2015 Tour of Europe might seem easy. In contrast to last year's 1,800-mile Macau-to-Tokyo hop, the orchestra's Tuesday to June 7 tour's longest stretch is 714 miles between Vienna and Amsterdam, and involves venues that have been hosting orchestras for decades, even centuries. Yet music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin laughs indulgently at the suggestion that 14 concerts in 17 days will be a breeze. "It's a totally different challenge.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2015 | By Sean Carney, For The Inquirer
On my second day in Paris, and the beginning of my 32d year, I stood among six or seven million skeletons as strangers sang "Happy Birthday" to me. There in the catacombs, 65 feet and 130 stone steps below the 14th arrondissement , I began my journey. It was last October, and Paris was the jumping-off point. From Gare L'Est, one of the city's oldest stations, I was to board the first of a series of trains that would take me across the waistline of Europe, tracing the original Orient Express through Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, and Turkey.
TRAVEL
March 15, 2015 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
Eastern Europe has experienced more change in the last generation than any other corner of Europe. With war-era grandpas now gone, across the former Warsaw Pact zone new museums and memorials deal candidly with the dark side of communism - and fascism before that. Here's the latest: In Prague, the National Museum on Wenceslas Square is wrapping up a long renovation. By mid-2015, visitors should be able to see its interior, decorated in the Czech Revival style that heralded the 19th-century rebirth of the Czech nation.
TRAVEL
March 1, 2015 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
In my work throughout Europe, I struggle almost daily with this issue: When is a tourist experience actually a unique slice of a culture, and when is it a tired cliché kept alive by the travel industry? Amped-up Spanish flamenco bars, dirndl skirts in Germany, ape tours of the Rock of Gibraltar - when does something slip from authentic to cheesy? When you've traveled for several decades, as I have, you witness genuine customs giving way to rising commercialization ("gladiators" charging exorbitant fees for photo-ops at the Roman Colosseum comes to mind)
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Most Americans born after World War II take peace and democracy in Western Europe for granted. Enfolded in the European Union, France and Germany became allies and Spain absorbed democratic values. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, former communist countries joined the fold and embraced parliamentary norms. But we forget all too easily that the 70 years since 1945 are an anomaly for Europe, whose previous 150 years of history were marked by war, ideological strife, and revolution.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Europe is far off, but the European Central Bank's decision to infuse money into the Eurozone via so-called quantitative easing will hit us all in the pocketbook, one way or another. Here's how: "Even if you don't live in Europe, this matters," says this post and video clip at Money.CNN.com. The markets' initial reactions were positive. Among other things, "the ECB's announcement showed investors that Europe may finally be serious about repairing its many economic problems. That should help contain the negative spillover to the U.S.," the post says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra last toured Europe in 2011 in deeply uncertain circumstances: The orchestra was still in bankruptcy and entering contract negotiations amid fears about the future. Yannick Nézet-Séguin had been appointed, but would not become music director until the next year. The orchestra was led by chief conductor Charles Dutoit. In contrast, the 2015 Tour of Europe, announced Tuesday, promises to be a consolidation of more successful times for the Philadelphia Orchestra, and under the leadership of Nézet-Séguin, already a well-known figure there.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s WiFi ambitions are going global. The Philadelphia cable company and Europe's Liberty Global say they have formed a partnership to offer Internet subscribers more than 10 million WiFi hotspots on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Xfinity Internet customers who travel to Europe can use Liberty's Global's WiFi for free, while Liberty Global subscribers who travel to the United States can use Comcast WiFi for free, the two companies said on Thursday. The Liberty Global partnership is the latest expansion of Comcast's fast-growing WiFi network that Wall Street analysts view as a potential asset and possible threat to Verizon Communications Inc., AT&T Inc. and other traditional wireless carriers.
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