CollectionsEurope
IN THE NEWS

Europe

NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John A. Quinn, 83, of Merion, a chemical engineer and professor known fondly to students as "Dr. Q," died Monday, Feb. 8, at Lankenau Hospital, where he had been taken after collapsing at home. Dr. Quinn had a long and distinguished career. He joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in the early 1970s and never really retired. He was given the university's S. Reid Warren Jr. Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1974 and the Robert D. Bent Professorship in 1978. He was chairman of the department of chemical and biochemical engineering from 1980 to 1985.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before he walked into an honors communications course at West Chester University, Grant Hubbard's ethnic identity was the stuff of skin color and oral history. He was the white guy with European roots whose family came to the United States shortly after the Mayflower arrived. Then science took over. The swipe of a cotton swab inside his cheek and a DNA test indicated that he had ancestors from Europe, and elsewhere. "My results came back 60 percent Southeast Asian," said Hubbard, 20, of Downingtown.
TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Erica Lamberg, For The Inquirer
It's been more than 16 years since we took a vacation alone with just one of our children, not counting an overnight college visit or baseball tournament. My husband and I are blessed with a daughter, Hannah, 18, and a son, Jared, 15. We always traveled as a family, and those vacations were among our happiest days together as I reflect on my motherhood years. My daughter leaves in August for the University of Florida in Gainesville. For the last seven summers, both of our children went to overnight camp.
NEWS
January 10, 1996
Tomorrow, Francois Mitterrand, the son of a railroad stationmaster and France's longest-serving modern president, will be buried in a family tomb in Jarnac, the town in southwestern France where he was born. His nation will put to rest one of its most complex and accomplished politicians; Europe and the West will bid adieu to one of the 20th century's last great leaders. Mr. Mitterrand, who died Monday after a long bout with cancer, leaves a complicated legacy. He brought the socialist left into mainstream politics, but was unable to make its economic theories stick.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NORTH SALEM, N.Y. - Since leaving her Upstate New York home for Switzerland seven years ago, pianist Hélène Grimaud has had new recordings, unexpected collaborators, repertoire nobody could have predicted - and a dashing German photographer often by her side. Yet the news coming back from Europe was also dire. Her long professional association with revered conductor Claudio Abbado came to a crashing halt in a disagreement over cadenzas, shelving their Mozart concerto recording. A series of Job-like health problems (chicken pox, pneumonia)
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley
Data backup and protection provider PHD Virtual Technologies, of Philadelphia, said it raised $4 million in funding. The company said it secured $2 million in funding from existing investors, Insight Venture Partners and Citrix. Another $2 million in venture debt financing came from Wellington Financial L.P. The money will be used, in part, for expansion into Europe, and for product development.  
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | By JAMES McCARTNEY
A controversy is brewing in Congress over the huge American investment in troops overseas at a time of monumental U.S. budget deficits and a worldwide Soviet peace offensive. Both conservatives and liberals are eyeing the numbers and wondering why it is necessary, in a time of easing tensions, to maintain about 460,000 military personnel in foreign countries. It is one of those slumbering issues just below the political surface that is almost certain to catch fire before the current session of Congress ends.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2013 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Small was beautiful this week. The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 15,000 for the first time Tuesday, then held above that milestone for the next three days. But an index of small-company stocks put the blue-chip gauge to shame for the week. On Friday, the Russell 2000 closed the week up 2.2 percent, more than double the Dow's gain. Small stocks stand a greater chance of surging than those of global companies do if the U.S. economy continues to fare better than those of Europe and Asia.
NEWS
September 14, 2015
U.S. must do its part for fleeing masses The United States should offer asylum to at least 250,000 of the migrants flooding into Europe from the Middle East, giving top priority to Iraqis and Afghans, whose countries we invaded. Additionally, our failure to thwart Bashar al-Assad's criminal government makes us responsible for the thousands of Syrians fleeing in fear. The "migrant problem" is every bit as much an American as a European problem, and we must do our share to take in people who are fleeing for their very lives.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States has many more medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe than previously acknowledged, the Washington Post and the Boston Globe reported today. In a related report, the Los Angeles Times reported that the Soviets had told U.S. officials that about 200 of their medium-range missiles, earlier described as operational, were really just training missiles and that many were filled with concrete. Many of the those missiles apparently were built to deceive U.S. spy satellites, the newspaper said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|