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SPORTS
August 17, 1994 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He's 27 now, searching for a place to play. At the Media Boys Club last night, Rodney Blake convinced many in the stands, at least, that his talents are still marketable. Blake, who played at St. Joseph's and led Monsignor Bonner to back-to-back Catholic League titles in the early 1980s, proved to be the difference in leading Radano & Associates to a 91-87 overtime victory over Shorter AME in the championship of the Media Men's League. Blake was selected the MVP of the championship after leading Radano with 24 points.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
Mary Stevenson Cassatt was one of the first American-born Impressionist painters. Though we often associate her with Philadelphia, she was born in 1844 in Allegheny City, Pa. (now part of Pittsburgh), and lived most of her life in Paris. Cassatt spent much of her youth in Europe. Her Philadelphia connection began in the 1860s, when she studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She was one of a group of female students who helped to introduce "life" classes - those dedicated to drawing from live models - by posing for one another.
NEWS
September 2, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lester Alfred Waters, 89, whose World War II service in Europe sparked an appreciation of cultural and ethnic diversity that he brought home to his job, his civil-rights work, and his seven children, died Wednesday of the effects of a stroke. Mr. Waters, a longtime resident of West Philadelphia, died at the Penn Center for Rehabilitation and Care after suffering a massive stroke Aug. 16. Though he dropped out of high school, Mr. Waters never stopped learning and impressed his value of education on his family, recalled Bertha Waters, his wife of 59 years.
TRAVEL
March 1, 2015 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
In my work throughout Europe, I struggle almost daily with this issue: When is a tourist experience actually a unique slice of a culture, and when is it a tired cliché kept alive by the travel industry? Amped-up Spanish flamenco bars, dirndl skirts in Germany, ape tours of the Rock of Gibraltar - when does something slip from authentic to cheesy? When you've traveled for several decades, as I have, you witness genuine customs giving way to rising commercialization ("gladiators" charging exorbitant fees for photo-ops at the Roman Colosseum comes to mind)
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Matt Breen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trainer Naazim Richardson shouted down from the ring apron toward his fighter: "You're not in Europe anymore, baby. " The crowd, he said, will be behind West Philadelphia's Steve "U.S.S. " Cunningham on April 20 when he fights heavyweight Tyson Fury in a 12-round afternoon bout at Madison Square Garden. And Livvy Cunningham, Steve's wife, prays that Richardson is right. Too many times, Cunningham sat alone in European stadiums cheering for her husband as he fought European fighters.
NEWS
February 2, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Next year when Jill Hanley is asked about what she did during summer vacation, she will be able to give her teacher a detailed presentation on her travels to England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. The sixth-grade student at Mullica Hill Friends School and 40 other students from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware plan to travel to Europe from July 6 to 19 as representatives of the People to People Student Ambassador Programs. People to People, founded in 1956 by former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, promotes international understanding through education and friendship.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Paper Paging Through History By Mark Kurlansky W.W. Norton. 416 pp. $27.95. Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mark Kurlansky has created a niche writing about things that we take for granted. Cod , his briny and brainy "biography of the fish that changed the world," won a James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing in 1999. He has written about salt and oysters and frozen food, all with a flair that can make the mundane mesmerizing.
SPORTS
June 8, 2006 | By FRANK BERTUCCI For the Daily News
THE NEWS BROKE about 3:15 yesterday afternoon. Or was it not news? The English Football Association's Web site reported that Wayne Rooney was headed back to Germany from England. No official announcement was made, but the three-paragraph brief said that "Rooney's smiles as he left the building" [the BUPA Hospital in Manchester], must mean that he was cleared to play. So with that, let's begin playing those 64 games. The most undramatic pre-World Cup buildup in memory culminated with that expected end to the Wayne Rooney broken right foot saga.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | BY MCGEORGE BUNDY, From the New York Times
Mikhail S. Gorbachev's speech to the United Nations, in its announcement of a dramatic reduction and redirection of Soviet conventional forces, is an event of high importance, and the first response of our own Government is excellent: President Reagan heartily approves and President-elect Bush agrees with him. It is to Vice President Bush's advantage, in this situation, that Gorbachev's announcement comes at a time when everyone knows that the...
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | By Linda Chavez
The news that California has become the first majority minority state was bound to cause anxiety in some quarters, but who could imagine that the loudest voices would come from across the Atlantic? Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that non-Hispanic whites now make up only 49.8 percent of the California population, a story that generated headlines across the nation but only the mildest concern from most U.S. experts or ordinary Americans. But in England and elsewhere in Europe, the reaction of many bordered on the hysterical.
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