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SPORTS
July 1, 1997 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Overseas, it takes more than a jump shot to play basketball. It can take knowledge of Swedish tax laws, or proper locker room etiquette in Saudi Arabia. Playing overseas can mean adulation on the streets of Seoul. And learning which streets to avoid in Belfast. There ought to be a guidebook, a Fodor's, for the dozens of Philadelphia ballplayers making a living abroad - many more than end up in the NBA. Have a whatever happened to question about a onetime local star? The answer is likely to be found in a foreign basketball league.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before he walked into an honors communications course at West Chester University, Grant Hubbard's ethnic identity was the stuff of skin color and oral history. He was the white guy with European roots whose family came to the United States shortly after the Mayflower arrived. Then science took over. The swipe of a cotton swab inside his cheek and a DNA test indicated that he had ancestors from Europe, and elsewhere. "My results came back 60 percent Southeast Asian," said Hubbard, 20, of Downingtown.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
STRASBURG, Pa. - Weeks after his birth in 2001, Benjamin Glick was stricken with a mysterious illness. He would vomit and pass out. He wouldn't eat and lost weight. Over five agonizing months, his parents took him to 12 doctors at six hospitals in the Philadelphia area. "He was fading out, we were going to lose him," said his father, Amos Glick, who is Old Order Amish and runs a foundry in Chester County. It took a clinic in a Lancaster County cornfield to save the boy. Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia sent the family to the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a wall in Norman Constantine's room hangs a poster of Bruce Lee, that powerful character from the old martial arts movies. It seems only fitting. After all, Norm Constantine was always a pretty powerful character himself. For two years a decade ago, the handsome, 6-foot karate black belt reigned as the colorful Nittany Lion mascot at Pennsylvania State University. Off the field, his tireless array of activities instructing, coaching and bringing cheer to disabled people would make the President's schedule look leisurely.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this town, where high-rollers are routinely wooed by those who run the casinos, big spenders of a different breed began arriving late Thursday. They came to buy art, and they, too, were being pampered. Specifically, they arrived to check out the art of Donna Summer. Yes, that Donna Summer, who in 1975 became the queen of the discos with a hit titled "Love to Love You Baby. " Covering one entire side of an LP, it amounted to a marathon orgasm. But the number sure did have a beat.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
An early death is almost commonplace among pop stars, but there is surely no more unusual epitaph associated with all of rock's tragedies than the one written on Ritchie Valens' headstone in Los Angeles. His stage name, Ritchie Valens, and his given name, Richard Valenzuela, share equal space on the marker. Beneath them are the title and music to the opening bars of his first hit, "Come On Let's Go. " "That's just the way Connie (Valens' mother) wanted it," said Luis Valdez.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The roads are closed. Most players are here. And on Monday morning, the U.S. Open will officially be underway. After years of planning, months of anticipation, and an explosion of recent construction, the area around Merion Golf Club appeared ready Sunday to host the nation's golf championship. There were new, electronic signs along Haverford Road and Ardmore Avenue, which surround the course, telling drivers to head elsewhere for the week. Police officers blocked road entrances, as well, directing cars to detours.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outraged by the School Reform Commission's decision to cancel its collective bargaining agreement with Philadelphia public school teachers, city labor leaders contemplated calling for a general strike. In two meetings, last Thursday and Sunday, labor leaders debated the wisdom of asking members of all area unions - laborers, electricians, communications workers, janitors, nurses, bus drivers, city employees - to walk off their jobs to protest the SRC's decision. "If there is going to be a fight, we have to fight about the future, and the kids are the future," said Henry Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, headquartered in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
August 1, 1989 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long before the closing ceremonies drew a record crowd of 48,571, it had become obvious that the 1989 U.S. Olympic Festival rated A-OK with a lot of folks in Oklahoma. The most recent edition of the nation's largest amateur sports event generated $3,028,043.50 - a ticket revenue record - and the 13-day attendance of 423,039 left the state's total second only to North Carolina's 464,423, set in 1987. Like its most recent predecessors, the '89 Olympic Festival succeeded best in preparing athletes for the Olympic experience.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In June 1917, corn grew on the land that would soon sprout Camp Dix. Three months later, nearly 50,000 young men were there training and living in barracks built so quickly that they had no indoor plumbing. Large stoves were used for heat, and the electricity was carried by two lone wires running down the center of each building. "They were training in the clothes they arrived in," historian Daniel W. Zimmerman, curator of the Fort Dix Museum, told a crowd Tuesday at Barnes & Noble Bookseller at the East Gate Square shopping center.
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