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NEWS
March 30, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
As a teenager growing up on a Blackfoot Indian reservation in Browning, Mont., during the Great Depression, Armund E. Foley yearned to take to the woods alone and hunt. Sometimes, in the early morning, he'd peer through his bedroom window into the gorges and passes of the Rocky Mountains that encircled his six-street town. The panoramic view of the emerald, tree-covered slopes would turn his thoughts to a day of hunting and stalking wild animals, such as rabbits, deer, elk and pheasants.
SPORTS
June 25, 2008
Position: Small forward Age: 22 Height/weight: 6-10, 210 Hometown: Casselberry, Fla. Relevant stats: Calathes led the Hawks in points (17.5), rebounds (7.5), blocks (42) and was second in assists (92) and third in steals (42). Breakdown: As can be seen by his stats, Calathes is as versatile as they come. He is intriguing in that he can handle and pass the ball so well for a player with his height . . . He did well for himself in NBA workout camps in Portsmouth, Va., and Orlando, Fla. . . . He knows the game extremely well, which often overrides his lack of athleticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NORTH SALEM, N.Y. - Since leaving her Upstate New York home for Switzerland seven years ago, pianist Hélène Grimaud has had new recordings, unexpected collaborators, repertoire nobody could have predicted - and a dashing German photographer often by her side. Yet the news coming back from Europe was also dire. Her long professional association with revered conductor Claudio Abbado came to a crashing halt in a disagreement over cadenzas, shelving their Mozart concerto recording. A series of Job-like health problems (chicken pox, pneumonia)
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: For several years, I've taken a vacation in the spring with three other women, to various cities in Europe. We're Internet friends who met through a hobby; none of us lives in the same town. I found out that this spring's vacation has been planned, and I'm not invited. I emailed the woman I feel closest to, and she said it was because I was worried about money right now, which is true, but not really an answer.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John A. Quinn, 83, of Merion, a chemical engineer and professor known fondly to students as "Dr. Q," died Monday, Feb. 8, at Lankenau Hospital, where he had been taken after collapsing at home. Dr. Quinn had a long and distinguished career. He joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in the early 1970s and never really retired. He was given the university's S. Reid Warren Jr. Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1974 and the Robert D. Bent Professorship in 1978. He was chairman of the department of chemical and biochemical engineering from 1980 to 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
'I'm realistic," said Ben E. King. "I've been in show business a long time. I've seen singers come and go. I've been lucky, though. It's been a good career, but it could end at any time. But I don't worry about that. If it ends for me right now, I have no complaints. It's been a wonderful ride. " That ride has included a number of hit records. One of them, a song King cowrote called "Stand By Me," was a smash in 1960 and resurfaced big-time in 1986 as the theme song of a movie with the same name.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The second woman charged in the "JihadJane" case, Jamie Paulin-Ramirez, is deeply worried about her 6-year-old son and stunned at the international attention she has received after voluntarily returning to the United States, her attorney said Wednesday. Paulin-Ramirez, 31, was ordered detained for trial at a brief federal court hearing in Philadelphia, where she shook her head to indicate a not-guilty plea rather than use her voice. She is accused of traveling to Europe in the fall with her son at the invitation of a Montgomery County woman, Colleen R. LaRose, also known as "JihadJane.
SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
REDSHIRTING is a common practice for college athletes, especially football players. Theoretically, the idea is to give freshmen a year to adjust to college life before throwing in the additional pressures of being an athlete. That they get a free year to physically develop is an important side issue. There are other reasons for redshirting, most often serious injury, and the first recognized case dates back to the University of Nebraska in 1937. Still, while redshirting is declining as more true freshmen are playing, a new phenomena involving the practice appears to be growing popularity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | zBy David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Composer Ned Rorem has always seemed to exist in his own well-furnished sphere, writing music regardless of current fashion, saying exactly what he thinks (right as he's thinking it), and striking stances that are effortlessly provocative and contrary. He may even give you an argument about his 90th birthday Wednesday. " Other people turn 90," said the Pulitzer Prize-winning Rorem, who will be celebrated at a tribute concert Wednesday at the Curtis Institute, where he was on the faculty until recent years.
SPORTS
July 1, 1997 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Overseas, it takes more than a jump shot to play basketball. It can take knowledge of Swedish tax laws, or proper locker room etiquette in Saudi Arabia. Playing overseas can mean adulation on the streets of Seoul. And learning which streets to avoid in Belfast. There ought to be a guidebook, a Fodor's, for the dozens of Philadelphia ballplayers making a living abroad - many more than end up in the NBA. Have a whatever happened to question about a onetime local star? The answer is likely to be found in a foreign basketball league.
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