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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NORTH SALEM, N.Y. - Since leaving her Upstate New York home for Switzerland seven years ago, pianist Hélène Grimaud has had new recordings, unexpected collaborators, repertoire nobody could have predicted - and a dashing German photographer often by her side. Yet the news coming back from Europe was also dire. Her long professional association with revered conductor Claudio Abbado came to a crashing halt in a disagreement over cadenzas, shelving their Mozart concerto recording. A series of Job-like health problems (chicken pox, pneumonia)
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: For several years, I've taken a vacation in the spring with three other women, to various cities in Europe. We're Internet friends who met through a hobby; none of us lives in the same town. I found out that this spring's vacation has been planned, and I'm not invited. I emailed the woman I feel closest to, and she said it was because I was worried about money right now, which is true, but not really an answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
'I'm realistic," said Ben E. King. "I've been in show business a long time. I've seen singers come and go. I've been lucky, though. It's been a good career, but it could end at any time. But I don't worry about that. If it ends for me right now, I have no complaints. It's been a wonderful ride. " That ride has included a number of hit records. One of them, a song King cowrote called "Stand By Me," was a smash in 1960 and resurfaced big-time in 1986 as the theme song of a movie with the same name.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The second woman charged in the "JihadJane" case, Jamie Paulin-Ramirez, is deeply worried about her 6-year-old son and stunned at the international attention she has received after voluntarily returning to the United States, her attorney said Wednesday. Paulin-Ramirez, 31, was ordered detained for trial at a brief federal court hearing in Philadelphia, where she shook her head to indicate a not-guilty plea rather than use her voice. She is accused of traveling to Europe in the fall with her son at the invitation of a Montgomery County woman, Colleen R. LaRose, also known as "JihadJane.
SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
REDSHIRTING is a common practice for college athletes, especially football players. Theoretically, the idea is to give freshmen a year to adjust to college life before throwing in the additional pressures of being an athlete. That they get a free year to physically develop is an important side issue. There are other reasons for redshirting, most often serious injury, and the first recognized case dates back to the University of Nebraska in 1937. Still, while redshirting is declining as more true freshmen are playing, a new phenomena involving the practice appears to be growing popularity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | zBy David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Composer Ned Rorem has always seemed to exist in his own well-furnished sphere, writing music regardless of current fashion, saying exactly what he thinks (right as he's thinking it), and striking stances that are effortlessly provocative and contrary. He may even give you an argument about his 90th birthday Wednesday. " Other people turn 90," said the Pulitzer Prize-winning Rorem, who will be celebrated at a tribute concert Wednesday at the Curtis Institute, where he was on the faculty until recent years.
SPORTS
July 1, 1997 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Overseas, it takes more than a jump shot to play basketball. It can take knowledge of Swedish tax laws, or proper locker room etiquette in Saudi Arabia. Playing overseas can mean adulation on the streets of Seoul. And learning which streets to avoid in Belfast. There ought to be a guidebook, a Fodor's, for the dozens of Philadelphia ballplayers making a living abroad - many more than end up in the NBA. Have a whatever happened to question about a onetime local star? The answer is likely to be found in a foreign basketball league.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before he walked into an honors communications course at West Chester University, Grant Hubbard's ethnic identity was the stuff of skin color and oral history. He was the white guy with European roots whose family came to the United States shortly after the Mayflower arrived. Then science took over. The swipe of a cotton swab inside his cheek and a DNA test indicated that he had ancestors from Europe, and elsewhere. "My results came back 60 percent Southeast Asian," said Hubbard, 20, of Downingtown.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a wall in Norman Constantine's room hangs a poster of Bruce Lee, that powerful character from the old martial arts movies. It seems only fitting. After all, Norm Constantine was always a pretty powerful character himself. For two years a decade ago, the handsome, 6-foot karate black belt reigned as the colorful Nittany Lion mascot at Pennsylvania State University. Off the field, his tireless array of activities instructing, coaching and bringing cheer to disabled people would make the President's schedule look leisurely.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this town, where high-rollers are routinely wooed by those who run the casinos, big spenders of a different breed began arriving late Thursday. They came to buy art, and they, too, were being pampered. Specifically, they arrived to check out the art of Donna Summer. Yes, that Donna Summer, who in 1975 became the queen of the discos with a hit titled "Love to Love You Baby. " Covering one entire side of an LP, it amounted to a marathon orgasm. But the number sure did have a beat.
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