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BUSINESS
January 11, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Next month, the first shipment of Marcellus Shale ethane will set sail from Marcus Hook to Norway, launching a new export trade for the Delaware River port that is being hailed as a boost to the gas industry, local maritime interests, and European manufacturing. Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. has committed $2.5 billion to the Mariner East pipeline network to transport ethane and other liquid fuels, such as propane and butane, across Pennsylvania from the Marcellus fields to that Marcus Hook terminal, erected on the site of a former oil refinery.
NEWS
December 23, 2015
EUROPE In '15, over a million refugees entered More than one million people driven out of their countries by war, poverty, and persecution entered Europe in 2015, the Swiss-based International Organization for Migration said Tuesday. With just days left in 2015, IOM said 1,005,504 people had entered Europe as of Monday, more than four times as many as last year. Almost all came by sea, while 3,692 others drowned trying to make the crossing. Another 11 people, including three children, drowned Tuesday after their boat capsized while crossing the Aegean Sea, according to Turkish media.
TRAVEL
September 14, 2015 | By Mary Mooney, For The Inquirer
Fixed income? I had no idea what those words really meant until we retired and were there. Like many baby boomers, we've taken our share of financial hits. We've also made a few "great decisions at the time" that have come back to bite us in our fixed incomes. Neither of us got the 30-year handshake, which would have given us the financial freedom to play in Europe like many of our friends. We play anyway. The other day, we went on a European road trip . . . in Bucks County and New Jersey.
NEWS
September 14, 2015
U.S. must do its part for fleeing masses The United States should offer asylum to at least 250,000 of the migrants flooding into Europe from the Middle East, giving top priority to Iraqis and Afghans, whose countries we invaded. Additionally, our failure to thwart Bashar al-Assad's criminal government makes us responsible for the thousands of Syrians fleeing in fear. The "migrant problem" is every bit as much an American as a European problem, and we must do our share to take in people who are fleeing for their very lives.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: For several years, I've taken a vacation in the spring with three other women, to various cities in Europe. We're Internet friends who met through a hobby; none of us lives in the same town. I found out that this spring's vacation has been planned, and I'm not invited. I emailed the woman I feel closest to, and she said it was because I was worried about money right now, which is true, but not really an answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My ailing-for-several-years grandmother has just been admitted to the hospital with what sounds like a serious health problem, and I leave on a European trip tomorrow afternoon. Am I a bad grandchild for not even considering a postponement? I saw her a few weeks ago, and she barely seems to know who I am anymore. Answer: This is your conscience! Sorry, I can neither take you off this hook nor put you on it. You want to go to Europe but are afraid others will judge you for it, right?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Howard Gensler, Daily News Staff Writer
Art of Dixie? The  Dixie Chicks , Tattle's favorite country trio, is returning to Europe for their first headlining tour since lead singer and Texan  Natalie Maines  said during the  George W. Bush  administration, "We're ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas. " The line went over well in London, but the Chicks got hammered on American country radio, they took flak for being un-American, CDs were destroyed, concert dates were canceled and the threesome made only one more (albeit great)
SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
REDSHIRTING is a common practice for college athletes, especially football players. Theoretically, the idea is to give freshmen a year to adjust to college life before throwing in the additional pressures of being an athlete. That they get a free year to physically develop is an important side issue. There are other reasons for redshirting, most often serious injury, and the first recognized case dates back to the University of Nebraska in 1937. Still, while redshirting is declining as more true freshmen are playing, a new phenomena involving the practice appears to be growing popularity.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
After Asia, the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2015 Tour of Europe might seem easy. In contrast to last year's 1,800-mile Macau-to-Tokyo hop, the orchestra's Tuesday to June 7 tour's longest stretch is 714 miles between Vienna and Amsterdam, and involves venues that have been hosting orchestras for decades, even centuries. Yet music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin laughs indulgently at the suggestion that 14 concerts in 17 days will be a breeze. "It's a totally different challenge.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2015 | By Sean Carney, For The Inquirer
On my second day in Paris, and the beginning of my 32d year, I stood among six or seven million skeletons as strangers sang "Happy Birthday" to me. There in the catacombs, 65 feet and 130 stone steps below the 14th arrondissement , I began my journey. It was last October, and Paris was the jumping-off point. From Gare L'Est, one of the city's oldest stations, I was to board the first of a series of trains that would take me across the waistline of Europe, tracing the original Orient Express through Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, and Turkey.
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