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NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
She's always been an autobiographical artist, using her writing and two-color illustrations to express her inner life. But Liana Finck's debut graphic novel, A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York , which captures the experience of Jewish immigrants at the beginning of the 20th century, took her entirely out of herself. Finck, 29, will discuss the book with renowned cartoonist Terry LaBan (who is also the co-creator of the Edge City comic, which appears in The Inquirer)
NEWS
June 30, 2010
Alfred Donath, 78, a Jewish activist who helped Holocaust victims and their heirs recover money from Swiss banks, died Monday in Geneva, Switzerland. Dr. Donath led the Swiss Federation of Jewish Communities (SIG) from 2000 to 2008. He was a key figure in mediations between the World Jewish Congress and Swiss banks and was the federation's vice president in 1998, when Swiss banks reached an out-of-court settlement to pay Holocaust victims and their heirs $1.25 billion. The deal followed a concerted campaign by the congress and several lawsuits.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Germans inside government and out yesterday condemned Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's dismissal of the Holocaust as a Western myth, as the world continued to denounce him and warn that his statements could have broader consequences. "I thought, My God, he's a Nazi," said Thilo Meyn, 43, as he stood in a bitter wind whistling through the gray, tombstonelike pillars that make up Germany's Holocaust-inspired Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. "I couldn't believe that again the world was faced with a Nazi as a head of state.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 89-year-old Northeast Philadelphia man facing extradition to Germany to face Nazi war-crimes charges was hospitalized over the weekend, throwing into doubt the future of U.S. efforts to quickly remove him. Johann Breyer, a retired tool and die maker, who immigrated to Philadelphia in 1952, has been in federal custody since last month, when the U.S. Department of Justice initiated extradition proceedings against him. The department's efforts...
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | BY RICHARD COHEN
Back in 1990, I wrote a column that, in certain circles, did nothing to enhance my reputation. I suggested that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, then under construction, should not be located on the Mall in Washington, but in Berlin. Since then the Holocaust Museum opened anyway and quickly established itself as one of Washington's most popular - if that word has any meaning in this context - tourist sites. In two years, about four million people have visited it. I stand rebuffed, but not chastened.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Rafael Medoff
Sixty years ago this month, many Philadelphians became aware of the Holocaust for the first time, thanks to a dramatic pageant staged at Convention Hall by an alliance of Jewish activists and Hollywood celebrities. The pageant, We Will Never Die, was the brainchild of Ben Hecht, an Academy Award-winning screenwriter. Hecht was involved with a small Jewish activist group led by Peter Bergson, a Zionist emissary from Palestine who was determined to bring Allied action to rescue Jews from Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | By Jerry Abejo INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an emotional yet restrained ceremony at the Capitol, President Bush paid homage yesterday to the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust and told those gathered: "Our country stands on watch for the rise of tyranny. " "This Day of Remembrance marks more than a single historic tragedy, but six million important lives - all the possibilities, all the dreams, and all the innocence that died with them," said Bush, who was the keynote speaker at the annual event commemorating those who died at the hands of the Nazis.
NEWS
March 21, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elie Wiesel, who at age 15 emerged from Nazi death camps at Auschwitz and Buchenwald without his family and who went on to write of his nightmare, to teach and, last year, to win the Nobel Peace Prize, received an honorary degree Thursday night from Villanova University. Wiesel, 58, who lives in New York, received a doctorate in humane letters during a ceremony attended by 1,150 people at the duPont Pavilion. Barbara E. Wall, an assistant professor of philosophy, called Wiesel "the conscience of the 20th century" and praised him for "addressing the reality of violence so we may never forget what we are capable of. " In an interview before the ceremony, Daniel Regan, a professor of philosophy who had helped in arranging for Wiesel to come to the campus, said some of his students were unaware of the Holocaust, in which more than six million European Jews were killed by the Nazis before and during World War II. "To them," Regan said, "it's ancient history, like you and I worrying about Attila the Hun. There is definitely a problem in terms of global awareness and historical reflection.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Fifty years ago, Nazi leaders gathered in a fashionable Berlin suburb to plot the eradication of European Jews. Yesterday, Philadelphia-area survivors of the Holocaust told a House subcommittee of their experiences during that terrible time. Rep. Peter Kostmayer, D-Pa., said he held the hearing because there are several generations that have not been touched by the Holocaust and he thinks people need to be reminded. Edith Millman, of Willow Grove, Montgomery County, was 15 when the Nazis began bombing Warsaw, Poland.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | by Gloria Campisi and Ron Goldwyn Daily News Staff Writers
It is with torn emotions that they scan "the list. " Leopold Goldberger's name is not there, although it should be, says his grandson, Ari, of Cherry Hill. Neither are the three Steinberger brothers, horse and cattle dealers in prewar Germany and the uncles of suburban Philadelphia resident Ruth Bank. Another woman from South Jersey does find the name of her dead father, a wealthy businessman from Budapest, on the list of nearly 2,000 long-dormant accounts released Wednesday by Swiss banks under pressure from Holocaust survivors and their families.
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NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
She's always been an autobiographical artist, using her writing and two-color illustrations to express her inner life. But Liana Finck's debut graphic novel, A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York , which captures the experience of Jewish immigrants at the beginning of the 20th century, took her entirely out of herself. Finck, 29, will discuss the book with renowned cartoonist Terry LaBan (who is also the co-creator of the Edge City comic, which appears in The Inquirer)
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 89-year-old Northeast Philadelphia man facing extradition to Germany to face Nazi war-crimes charges was hospitalized over the weekend, throwing into doubt the future of U.S. efforts to quickly remove him. Johann Breyer, a retired tool and die maker, who immigrated to Philadelphia in 1952, has been in federal custody since last month, when the U.S. Department of Justice initiated extradition proceedings against him. The department's efforts...
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - His garden stroll with Adolf Hitler left Alfred Rosenberg invigorated. Rosenberg was already one of the most notorious and powerful Nazis, chief architect of ethnic cleansing policies and the man responsible for plundering billions of dollars of art from European Jews. At the meeting in April 1941, Hitler spoke of a larger role. "Your hour has come," he said, according to an account Rosenberg scrawled in his diary. For nearly 70 years, the infamous diary, an unprecedented insider's glimpse of the Third Reich, was lost or hidden.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
Alfred Donath, 78, a Jewish activist who helped Holocaust victims and their heirs recover money from Swiss banks, died Monday in Geneva, Switzerland. Dr. Donath led the Swiss Federation of Jewish Communities (SIG) from 2000 to 2008. He was a key figure in mediations between the World Jewish Congress and Swiss banks and was the federation's vice president in 1998, when Swiss banks reached an out-of-court settlement to pay Holocaust victims and their heirs $1.25 billion. The deal followed a concerted campaign by the congress and several lawsuits.
NEWS
January 11, 2007 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
'IF WE REALLY want to know the truth about history, we need to allow freedom of speech. " So I was told by David Duke in an interview three weeks ago via a scratchy connection from Tehran. He was in Iran to participate in Mahmoud Admadinejad's Holocaust conference. I've followed Duke's career and find his repeated condemnation of Israel and its supporters to be abhorrent. And I knew that accepting an invitation to interview the former Klan Imperial Wizard would cause a stir.
NEWS
May 8, 2006 | By Charles Krauthammer
When something happens for the first time in 1,871 years, it is worth noting. In A.D. 70, and again in 135, the Roman empire brutally put down Jewish revolts in Judea, destroying Jerusalem, killing hundreds of thousands of Jews, and sending hundreds of thousands more into slavery and exile. For nearly two millennia, the Jews wandered the world. And now, in 2006, for the first time since then, there are once again more Jews living in Israel - the successor state to Judea - than in any other place on Earth.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Germans inside government and out yesterday condemned Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's dismissal of the Holocaust as a Western myth, as the world continued to denounce him and warn that his statements could have broader consequences. "I thought, My God, he's a Nazi," said Thilo Meyn, 43, as he stood in a bitter wind whistling through the gray, tombstonelike pillars that make up Germany's Holocaust-inspired Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. "I couldn't believe that again the world was faced with a Nazi as a head of state.
NEWS
December 4, 2005 | By Ophir Lehavy Busel FOR THE INQUIRER
The sun shone brightly as my husband and I boarded a train at the Tel Aviv railroad station. During the Ottoman Empire, the Turks built train tracks that brought passengers from the ancient seaport of Jaffa to Jerusalem. We were on our way to Jerusalem on that historic route to connect to our past. Our train moved out slowly as we sat back in our seats and looked out of the large windows at the view that surrounded us. The route wrapped around the history and beauty that the words "route to Jerusalem" suggests.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Rafael Medoff
Sixty years ago this month, many Philadelphians became aware of the Holocaust for the first time, thanks to a dramatic pageant staged at Convention Hall by an alliance of Jewish activists and Hollywood celebrities. The pageant, We Will Never Die, was the brainchild of Ben Hecht, an Academy Award-winning screenwriter. Hecht was involved with a small Jewish activist group led by Peter Bergson, a Zionist emissary from Palestine who was determined to bring Allied action to rescue Jews from Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | By Jerry Abejo INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an emotional yet restrained ceremony at the Capitol, President Bush paid homage yesterday to the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust and told those gathered: "Our country stands on watch for the rise of tyranny. " "This Day of Remembrance marks more than a single historic tragedy, but six million important lives - all the possibilities, all the dreams, and all the innocence that died with them," said Bush, who was the keynote speaker at the annual event commemorating those who died at the hands of the Nazis.
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