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NEWS
December 20, 2002
The European Union formally invited 10 mostly Eastern European nations into the club recently. . . . But the event was overshadowed by the invitation pointedly not issued. . . . Turkey will have to wait, said the EU. Yes, Europe said, Turkey has made progress in reforming its economy and by outlawing the death penalty, but more needs to be done. . . . The EU is entitled to insist that Turkey be measured by the same criteria as any other potential member. But Turkey then is entitled to an invitation.
NEWS
June 20, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When former French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing toasted the European Union's draft constitution with Bollinger champagne and Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" last week after chairing the EU constitutional convention, he crowed that the much-debated document would last the next 50 years. By then, will the dream of a powerful and united Europe be any closer? As EU leaders meet in Greece today to consider the new constitution, intended to help revamp the organization as it enlarges from 15 to 25 members, Europe is suffering the pain of growth.
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
It's time to focus laserlike attention on the meaning of a Donald Trump presidency for America's security. Until now, the presumption that Trump wouldn't win or doesn't really mean what he says has led to insufficient scrutiny of how his presidency would threaten our safety. Many security experts - including leading Republicans - have raised concerns, but their protests haven't risen to the level of the danger. The time for such complacency is past. The Donald brags he will make America "great again," but the policies he promotes would do exactly the opposite: emboldening our enemies, undercutting our allies, and destroying America's clout in the world.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In the early 1990s, after the collapse of the Soviet empire, most Western nations basked in the illusion that liberal democracy had triumphed. Many thought NATO had become an anachronism in an era of permanent European peace. Some countries freed from Kremlin control, including tiny Estonia, knew better. Only 21/2 decades later, the European Union teeters and populism thrives - on both sides of the Atlantic. A revanchist Russia bent on restoring past glory makes nuclear threats against members of the NATO alliance.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
The greatest threat to American security is something most Americans never think of. President Obama touched on it in his speech to the European people on Monday in Germany. I'm not referring to ISIS, although Obama called the terrorist group "the most urgent threat to our nations" in his remarks. I'm talking about a more existential threat to Europe (and America): a diminishing faith in democracy as a political system. On the continent, this is manifested by the widening cracks in the European Union and the rise of radical right-wing parties.
NEWS
August 10, 2016
By Pete Hoekstra Last month, a Syrian asylum-seeker who was set to be deported detonated a nail-filled suicide bomb outside of a concert in southern Germany. German Chancellor Angela Merkel admitted that members of the Islamic State were among the more than 1 million migrants from destabilized areas of the Middle East and Africa whom she invited into her country. In the days prior to the Bastille Day massacre in Nice, France's intelligence chief warned that another attack on French soil or a mass sexual assault by migrants - similar to the one that occurred in Germany on New Year's Eve - could result in a "civil war. " The Dutch are investigating a possible jihadist cell in a refugee center in the Netherlands, and Norwegian police arrested a former Syrian al-Qaeda fighter seeking asylum in Europe.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For many trade specialists and economists, the huge unknown underlying Great Britain's possible departure from the European Union is what impact it would have on the British economy, and what that would mean for Americans who do business there. It is Andrew Hood's job to advise hedge funds, investment banks, manufacturers, and others on the potential fallout if British voters decide in a June 23 referendum that it is time to leave. What that means essentially is getting clients ready to get ready.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In this sour campaign season, where the immigration issue has turned so ugly, it's instructive to watch the European debate over migrants. That debate should make Americans realize how lucky we are. As an immigration country, we have a proven ability to absorb newcomers, including those from Muslim countries. (And we could resolve the problem of illegals from south of the border if both parties cooperated.) Europe, on the other hand, has failed to integrate generations of Muslim guest workers, many of whom still live in ghettos and are preyed on by radical Islamists.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
Three cheers for President Bush's plan to start bringing American troops home from bases in Europe and Asia ("70,000 overseas troops to leave," Aug. 17). This action is long overdue. There is no question that after World War II and at the start of the Cold War we needed troops in Germany as a first line of defense against Soviet attack. Now that the Cold War has ended and the European Union has been ratified, we need not continue our presence there. Since 1945, we have poured trillions into foreign economies while closing bases and reducing troop strength in the United States.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
PARIS - After Brussels, President Obama's strategy of gradually degrading ISIS looks terribly risky. And much too slow. Yes, ISIS has lost around 40 percent of the territory it seized in Syria and Iraq, much of it retaken by Kurdish forces with U.S. air support. But it still holds the cities at the heart of its so-called Islamic State: Raqqa in eastern Syria and the major urban area of Mosul in northern Iraq. Right now, it appears unlikely that either will be liberated anytime soon.
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NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
It's time to focus laserlike attention on the meaning of a Donald Trump presidency for America's security. Until now, the presumption that Trump wouldn't win or doesn't really mean what he says has led to insufficient scrutiny of how his presidency would threaten our safety. Many security experts - including leading Republicans - have raised concerns, but their protests haven't risen to the level of the danger. The time for such complacency is past. The Donald brags he will make America "great again," but the policies he promotes would do exactly the opposite: emboldening our enemies, undercutting our allies, and destroying America's clout in the world.
NEWS
August 31, 2016
Not since Barry Goldwater's 1964 campaign has there been such widespread public disavowal by Republicans of their party's nominee. The Hillary Clinton Republicans will be one of the most important legacies of the 2016 campaigns. The question is whether they will constitute the forward end of a political realignment, or just a one-time reaction to the unsuitability of Donald Trump for the presidency. Reasons for skepticism about long-term change are rooted in the differences between today's polarized politics and the more tempered partisanship surrounding the big-bang elections of 1964 and 1980.
NEWS
August 10, 2016
By John B. Quigley The recent spate of terrorist attacks in France and Germany has forced a rethinking of European immigration policy. But the violent events, however horrendous they've been, have done nothing to change the fact that millions have been displaced by broader violence, particularly in the Middle East, and are seeking refuge in the West. Until the wider circumstances change, European Union leaders will have a hard time stemming the flow of migrants crossing their borders.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of American Airlines rose Friday after the company reported second-quarter profit that beat Wall Street expectations. But on a year-over-year basis, revenue was down 4.3 percent and profits fell 44.3 percent. The bottom line was hurt by a $543 million provision for income taxes, capacity growth by competitors, continued global economic softness, and foreign currency weakness. Philadelphia's largest airline earned $950 million, or $1.68 per share, in the three months ended June 30, compared with $1.7 billion, or $2.41 per share, a year earlier.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
PARIS - These days, there is one overriding issue on the minds of the French. It isn't Brexit. Nor is it whether France will copy Britain and Frexit the European Union. Pas du tout . What is fixating the French is whether their national soccer team will beat Portugal in the final of the Euro 2016 championship tournament. Raucous celebrations for France's semifinal win over Germany went on most of Thursday night outside the Paris apartment where I'm staying. The national team, with its "Black, Blanc, Beur" (black, white, and Arab)
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Given their arrogance, pomposity, and habitual absurdities, it is hard not to feel a certain satisfaction with the comeuppance that Brexit has delivered to the unaccountable European Union bureaucrats in Brussels. Nonetheless, we would do well to refrain from smug condescension. Unity is not easy. What began in 1951 as a six-member European Coal and Steel Community was grounded in a larger conception of a united Europe born from the ashes of World War II. Seven decades into the postwar era, Britain wants out and the EU is facing an existential crisis.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Shortly before the Brexit vote, Germany's Der Spiegel magazine ran a cover story that urged the Brits: "Please don't go. " For Germans, long the most loyal supporters of the European Union, it was unthinkable that the British would leave them. After the Brexit shock, Der Spiegel has a new plea: "If we don't become more passionate about the European Union, we will lose it," writes columnist Stefan Kuzmany. There is widespread agreement that the future of a united Europe will be decided more by emotions than facts.
NEWS
July 4, 2016
Britain's vote to leave the European Union was greeted in the kingdom and its former colonies by more than a few facile comparisons to a 240-year-old revolution. "The Brexit referendum is akin to our own Declaration of Independence," former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin enthused. The leader of the far-right UK Independence Party, Nigel Farage, said the vote would "go down in history as our independence day. " Especially from a Philadelphian's perspective, such analogies, if followed to their absurd conclusion, suggest London and other major English cities had better gird for occupation.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
ISSUE | BREXIT U.S. voters can learn from Britain's fear We in the United States should take note of the reaction in Britain since its vote to withdraw from the European Union ("EU urges Britain to make quick exit," Sunday). Many who voted to leave expressed remorse. It would seem that far too many voted on an emotional rather than a rational basis. In the cold, clear light of day, "Leave" voters realized their choice had been based on emotion and xenophobia. Rational thought did not seem to factor in for these voters.
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