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NEWS
December 20, 2002
The European Union formally invited 10 mostly Eastern European nations into the club recently. . . . But the event was overshadowed by the invitation pointedly not issued. . . . Turkey will have to wait, said the EU. Yes, Europe said, Turkey has made progress in reforming its economy and by outlawing the death penalty, but more needs to be done. . . . The EU is entitled to insist that Turkey be measured by the same criteria as any other potential member. But Turkey then is entitled to an invitation.
NEWS
June 20, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When former French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing toasted the European Union's draft constitution with Bollinger champagne and Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" last week after chairing the EU constitutional convention, he crowed that the much-debated document would last the next 50 years. By then, will the dream of a powerful and united Europe be any closer? As EU leaders meet in Greece today to consider the new constitution, intended to help revamp the organization as it enlarges from 15 to 25 members, Europe is suffering the pain of growth.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Money may not buy you love, but lack of money is so rough on the psyche that it's life-threatening. A new study led by a University of Pennsylvania professor found that economic turmoil in Greece correlated with an increase in suicides for both men and women. Researchers from Penn, Greece, and Scotland analyzed month-by-month data on 11,505 suicides from 1983 through 2012. Charles Branas, a Penn epidemiologist, said previous studies had found more suicides during rough economic periods.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Most Americans born after World War II take peace and democracy in Western Europe for granted. Enfolded in the European Union, France and Germany became allies and Spain absorbed democratic values. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, former communist countries joined the fold and embraced parliamentary norms. But we forget all too easily that the 70 years since 1945 are an anomaly for Europe, whose previous 150 years of history were marked by war, ideological strife, and revolution.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
Three cheers for President Bush's plan to start bringing American troops home from bases in Europe and Asia ("70,000 overseas troops to leave," Aug. 17). This action is long overdue. There is no question that after World War II and at the start of the Cold War we needed troops in Germany as a first line of defense against Soviet attack. Now that the Cold War has ended and the European Union has been ratified, we need not continue our presence there. Since 1945, we have poured trillions into foreign economies while closing bases and reducing troop strength in the United States.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
LUXEMBOURG - Listeners probably thought they knew what they were getting at the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday opening concert of its 2015 Europe tour here. But after guest soloist Lisa Batiashvili played a hot Shostakovich Violin Concerto No. 1 , she and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin regrouped in the rear of the stage where the piano was parked. They played Tchaikovsky. The two had cooked it up in Philadelphia before leaving on tour, choosing the first of the composer's Six Romances Op. 6 ("Do Not Believe, My Friend")
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROME - Economist Mario Monti accepted the monumental task yesterday of trying to form a new government that can rescue Italy from financial ruin, expressing confidence that the nation can beat the crisis if its people pull together. His selection came a day after Silvio Berlusconi reluctantly resigned as premier, bowing out after world markets pummeled Italy's borrowing ability, reflecting a loss of faith in the 75-year-old media mogul's leadership. Berlusconi quit after the Italian parliament approved new reform measures demanded by the European Union and central bank officials - but even those are not considered enough to right Italy's ailing economy.
NEWS
July 25, 2010
Michael Burri teaches at the University of Pennsylvania In 2006, foreign-policy oddsmakers were touting the European Union. Global trends, they argued, were redistributing the balance of power, and the Europeans were on track to win. Mark Leonard summed up this thinking in his book Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century . What a difference four years makes. Today, few outside Brussels expect a fast track for Europe. Rattled by the euro crisis, boxed in by demographic challenges, and increasingly risk-averse, Europe is choosing to become, as scholar Ivan Krastev puts it, a "retired power.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
In terms of foreign aid, it felt like a bit of role reversal Friday at the University City Science Center. An audience of science center reps, scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs heard about funding opportunities, not from their own country with an eye to expanding globally, but money coming from the European Union. That's right: The 28 countries that make up the European Union have put up 70 billion euros, or more than $90 billion, to promote science and research aimed largely at bolstering Europe's position in the world but also with an eye to tackling issues of global significance as well, such as climate change.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
While both the U.S. and the European Union have begun to ratchet up economic sanctions on Russian banks and other interests following the July 17 downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine, the reaction of the Russian government so far has been muted, a panel of Dechert L.L.P. lawyers said in a conference call Thursday. Thus, the potential for a sharply escalating trade war apparently has been averted - at least for now. The conflict between the U.S. and European governments and Russia over Russian support for separatist rebels in Ukraine already has had damaging consequences for the Russian economy, said Dechert partner Laura Brank, and concern by the Russians over further harm from western sanctions has tended to weigh against retaliation.
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NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
LUXEMBOURG - Listeners probably thought they knew what they were getting at the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday opening concert of its 2015 Europe tour here. But after guest soloist Lisa Batiashvili played a hot Shostakovich Violin Concerto No. 1 , she and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin regrouped in the rear of the stage where the piano was parked. They played Tchaikovsky. The two had cooked it up in Philadelphia before leaving on tour, choosing the first of the composer's Six Romances Op. 6 ("Do Not Believe, My Friend")
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Money may not buy you love, but lack of money is so rough on the psyche that it's life-threatening. A new study led by a University of Pennsylvania professor found that economic turmoil in Greece correlated with an increase in suicides for both men and women. Researchers from Penn, Greece, and Scotland analyzed month-by-month data on 11,505 suicides from 1983 through 2012. Charles Branas, a Penn epidemiologist, said previous studies had found more suicides during rough economic periods.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Most Americans born after World War II take peace and democracy in Western Europe for granted. Enfolded in the European Union, France and Germany became allies and Spain absorbed democratic values. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, former communist countries joined the fold and embraced parliamentary norms. But we forget all too easily that the 70 years since 1945 are an anomaly for Europe, whose previous 150 years of history were marked by war, ideological strife, and revolution.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
While both the U.S. and the European Union have begun to ratchet up economic sanctions on Russian banks and other interests following the July 17 downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine, the reaction of the Russian government so far has been muted, a panel of Dechert L.L.P. lawyers said in a conference call Thursday. Thus, the potential for a sharply escalating trade war apparently has been averted - at least for now. The conflict between the U.S. and European governments and Russia over Russian support for separatist rebels in Ukraine already has had damaging consequences for the Russian economy, said Dechert partner Laura Brank, and concern by the Russians over further harm from western sanctions has tended to weigh against retaliation.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I've got some foreign policy good news. Really. Never mind that U.S. foreign policy appears irrelevant in Gaza, spineless in Syria, irresponsible in Iraq, and grossly stupid in Germany (whoever OKd our dumb spy efforts there should be fired). There is one important country where U.S. efforts may yet achieve a positive outcome. I'm talking about Ukraine, where Russia's Vladimir Putin has just blinked in his efforts to dismantle the country - in large part because Western sanctions (even mild ones)
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
KIEV, Ukraine - The crowds are gone from Independence Square, known as the Maidan, where massive demonstrations unseated a Ukrainian president. Yet the signs of struggle remain, sprawling across the Maidan and the surrounding streets: the tents and soup kitchens, the piles of black tires and debris, and the posters of the youthful dead on walls and makeshift shrines that are adorned daily with fresh flowers. Pay attention to this revolution. The Kremlin has tried to crush it by dismembering Ukraine and mounting a fierce propaganda campaign that falsely labels the uprising "fascist.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
George Santayana famously said, "Those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it. " But when it comes to Russia and Ukraine, Western leaders can't seem to decide which century's lessons they should take to heart. When Vladimir Putin's forces invaded Crimea, a stunned Secretary of State John Kerry initially opined: "It's a 19th-century act in the 21st century. " In other words, 21st-century rules of an interconnected world barred anything as atavistic as forceful seizure of European territory.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, I wrote that the Ukraine crisis did not mean the return of the Cold War. Since then, I've received e-mails from readers confused about what it does mean and why it should matter to Americans. Their confusion is warranted. The Ukraine crisis is far more complex than a simple matter of East vs. West or Obama vs. Putin. So here are some answers to a few of the queries I've received. If the Cold War is over - meaning the end of an existential and global conflict between two superpowers armed with nukes - why should the United States involve itself with Ukraine?
BUSINESS
September 22, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
In terms of foreign aid, it felt like a bit of role reversal Friday at the University City Science Center. An audience of science center reps, scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs heard about funding opportunities, not from their own country with an eye to expanding globally, but money coming from the European Union. That's right: The 28 countries that make up the European Union have put up 70 billion euros, or more than $90 billion, to promote science and research aimed largely at bolstering Europe's position in the world but also with an eye to tackling issues of global significance as well, such as climate change.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | BY DOYLE MCMANUS
  YOU THINK we have it bad, caught between a stagnant economy and gridlocked politics? Then take a trip to Europe, where the economy is going not sideways, but backward - and the politics are, too. In the United States, President Obama's much-derided stimulus package helped end our recession in 2009; in Europe, with no comparable stimulus, the recession isn't over. Unemployment in the 17 countries that share the euro is higher than 11 percent, and it's still heading up. Since 2008, Italy's gross domestic product has shrunk by almost 10 percent after inflation; by some estimates, Southern Europe is experiencing its worst drop in living standards since World War II. It all makes the U.S. recovery look positively healthy, even though our 2 percent growth rate and 7.6 percent unemployment feel anemic by modern standards.
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