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SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | By Frank Lawlor FOR THE INQUIRER
A couple of weeks ago, the major independent European basketball publication ran a headline heralding the first triple-double this season in the Euroleague, the elite professional competition that has been the source of starters for several playoff-bound NBA teams. The triple-double came as a surprise to me, the editor of the official Euroleague Web site, until I read more closely. The player in question indeed had scored 27 points and pulled down 10 rebounds, but his numbers after that were clearly single-digit.
NEWS
February 16, 1996 | By Trudy Rubin
A couple of weeks ago, Greece and Turkey nearly went to war over a 10-acre bunch of rocks in the Aegean inhabited by feral goats. The only thing that stopped the warships of these two NATO allies from opening fire - on each other - was a rescue mission by Assistant Secretary of State Richard C. Holbrooke, the same man who rescued the Europeans from their Bosnia mess by negotiating a Balkan peace. But Holbrooke is retiring from public service next week to rejoin the private sector.
SPORTS
October 9, 1993 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Players from the United States and Canada prevailed by 6 1/2-5 1/2 over Europe in the wrap-up of the two-day Seventh Senior Women's Invitation Match yesterday on the East Course of Merion Golf Club. North America now has won all seven meetings with Europe in the series. This year's victory was made possible by the 3-1 lead established by North America in Thursday's foursome matches (alternate drive and alternate stroke). Yesterday, Europe won four of the eight singles matches and halved one. Dorothy Porter of Riverton won the No. 4 singles match for North America by 2 and 1 over Emma Villacieros De Garcia-Ogara of Spain.
SPORTS
September 11, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
The NHL is importing too many European players and will be unable to call itself a North American league for much longer, says the president of the International Ice Hockey Federation. IIHF president Rene Fasel said he wants to see the NHL become more selective in pursuit of Europeans. "Almost half of the NHL is composed of European players," Fasel said in a telephone interview with the Associated Press. "The NHL is losing its North American identity, and at the same time, Europe is losing all its great talent.
SPORTS
November 2, 1992 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
They never had a chance. We invited the Europeans to the Breeders' Cup a decade ago and a trickle became a flood by Saturday's ninth Breeders' Cup at Gulfstream Park. The Europeans were winning and threatening to dominate America's greatest day of racing. But they had no chance Saturday. The Europeans encountered conditions that are uniquely American, surfaces with which they were not familiar. The main track was rock hard; it produced two Cup speed records, tied two more and favored horses with early speed with few exceptions.
SPORTS
September 25, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
No way. Europe couldn't win the Ryder Cup. Most everyone said so. The British bookmakers made them 5-2 underdogs. The Europeans hadn't won this biennial competition since 1987, which was also the only time they had been victorious on United States soil. They didn't have one of their best players, Jose Maria Olazabal, who was a late withdrawal because of a toe injury. And one of their giants in the last decade, Seve Ballesteros, has been a shell of his once-imposing self.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
The Bush administration yesterday began an investigation that could lead to trade retaliation against the 12-nation European Community in a dispute over the sanitary conditions of U.S. meatpacking plants. The trade inquiry had been expected as a way for the U.S. government to bring pressure on the Europeans to reach some sort of agreement on American demands that Europeans slash the huge subsidies they pay to farmers. That dispute has stalled a four-year effort to overhaul the global trading system.
SPORTS
April 7, 2011 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  AUGUSTA, Ga. - Led by some of the greatest players of their day, such as Nick Faldo, Seve Ballesteros, Bernhard Langer, and Jose Maria Olazabal, Europeans used to win the Masters fairly regularly, a remarkable feat considering that they made up a low percentage of the field. From 1980 through 1999, European players captured the year's first major 11 times in 20 tries, with people theorizing about everything from short game to course management at Augusta National to the influence of the Ryder Cup as the reasons.
SPORTS
September 26, 1997 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
Watch the 17th. The hole could win or lose the Ryder Cup. It is the 511-yard par 5 redesigned four years ago by Seve Ballesteros, the European captain. And it is a killer. The Americans were complaining about it after two days of practice. Ballesteros shook off criticism of his man-made monster. "If you don't like it," he said of the 17th, "it's only because you don't know how to play it. You should have your match won before you get to 17, and you won't have to worry about it. " Even a perfect tee shot can get golfers in trouble.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | By Bill Robinson, KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE
Two University of South Carolina researchers have unearthed on Parris Island what appears to be the oldest European-style pottery kiln in North America. If the discovery holds up under scrutiny - and experts believe it will - archaeologists who study the colonization of the Americas might have to re- evaluate their theories about the role of Spanish settlements in the Southeast. Until now, historians and archaeologists had believed much of the 16th- century pottery found in North America had come from Europe or sites in Central and South America.
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NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Should anyone require further proof that the promises of populists are worthless, they need only watch the latest psychodrama in London. Boris Johnson, the ex-London mayor and mop-haired Donald Trump clone who led the Conservative Party's "Leave" faction, just dropped his bid to become Britain's next prime minister. This was almost as shocking as the voters' decision to leave the European Union, since Johnson was the face of the Brexit campaign. But every glowing promise Johnson made before the Brexit vote has been walked back since by leading Brexiteers.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
The greatest threat to American security is something most Americans never think of. President Obama touched on it in his speech to the European people on Monday in Germany. I'm not referring to ISIS, although Obama called the terrorist group "the most urgent threat to our nations" in his remarks. I'm talking about a more existential threat to Europe (and America): a diminishing faith in democracy as a political system. On the continent, this is manifested by the widening cracks in the European Union and the rise of radical right-wing parties.
NEWS
October 28, 2015
WORDS HAVE POWER to make you believe, but also to deceive. In 1984 , his brilliant "Big Brother" novel (that in some ways has achieved reality), George Orwell invented Newspeak, a language in which words don't mean what they say. In real life, Orwell fought against opaque, meaningless words he thought discouraged clear thought. If you are pushing your point of view, you want it to sound smart and nice. You want the other guy's position to seem dumb and nasty. That's why abortion activists on both sides frame their positions as being positive: " pro -choice" or " pro -life.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
For anyone living or owning property on the East Coast, the message was ominous. "A significant adjustment to the forecast has been made this afternoon," the National Hurricane Center reported in its 5 p.m. Wednesday Hurricane Joaquin update, "and this shows an increased threat to the mid-Atlantic states and the Carolinas. " Then came the caveat: "However, confidence in the details of the forecast . . . remains low, since we have one normally excellent model that keeps Joaquin far away from the U.S. East Coast.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
FIRST it was Caldwell Jones, back in September of 2014 at the age of 64. Less than 3 weeks ago, it was Darryl Dawkins at the age of 58. Then, yesterday, it was Moses Malone at the age of 60. It is a horrible coincidence, the deaths of three former Sixers big men in such a short period of time, but it serves to highlight a link that scientists have identified and studied for decades, the link between height and longevity. A study of baseball players published in 2002 said that a typical major leaguer who stood 5-5 lived to around the age of 80 while a typical player who was 6-6 didn't make it to age 70. An inverse relationship between height and longevity also was found in a study of French men and women.
SPORTS
June 14, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS – So who is Kristaps Porzingis? Last summer, the 7-foot-1 power forward, with guard-like skills, received a lottery-pick guarantee from the Orlando Magic if he opted to remain in the 2014 draft. Porzingis instead withdrew his name and played another season for Baloncesto Sevilla of the Asociacion de Clubs de Baloncesto in Spain and was named Eurocup rising star for this past season. With that extra season of development, the 19-year-old believes the time is right to start his NBA career.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson, which has operations in the Philadelphia region, said it has formed a consortium to boost the drugmaker's efforts to quickly develop an Ebola vaccine, and the European-based Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) plans to award $115.8 million (100 million Euros) to help the project. IMI is a public-private initiative whose goal is to speed up the development of better and safer medicines. Besides J&J's Janssen Pharmaceutical division, the consortium includes the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM)
BUSINESS
November 16, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As European and North American diplomats are inching toward new global free-trade deals, trade representatives from countries including Italy, Germany, Britain, Poland, the Netherlands, and Sweden visited Philadelphia on Nov. 6 for a tour of business sites. They were eager to learn more about importing cheap gas and other fuels and raw materials from Pennsylvania and other states. "How many of your countries import gas from the Soviet Union?" asked Michael Krancer , a former Pennsylvania environmental secretary.
SPORTS
October 16, 2014 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
GAMES HAVE been called off for lots of strange reasons. A fire at Comiskey Park caused by the demolition of disco records led to the White Sox forfeiting a game in 1979. Bad turf at Veterans Stadium caused a preseason game against the Ravens to be canceled in 2001. Part of the roof flying off the Spectrum forced the Flyers to flee to Quebec in March 1968. Fans stampeded old RFK Stadium, forcing a premature end to the Washington Senators' very last game in D.C. in 1971 And there was even a Honeymooners episode called "Game called on account of marriage.
SPORTS
October 11, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The overwhelming belief is the 76ers are going to be the NBA's worst team. But based on two preseason games in Europe, it still might be fun to keep tabs on their maturation process. The Sixers push the ball, attack the rim, and keep defensive heat on opponents. "I'm very proud of my teammates for playing hard and playing tough," veteran guard Evan Turner said Tuesday after a 103-99 loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder at Phones 4U Arena in Manchester, England. "Any time you do that, you give yourself a chance to win night in and night out. " But the Sixers roster wasn't built to win night in and night out. The team has only six players with more than two years of NBA experience.
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