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NEWS
July 22, 1987 | By William F. Buckley Jr
Good evening. This is Dan Blather with the evening news. Today in Washington, John Poindexter testified that President Reagan knew nothing about the diversion of funds from the sale of arms to Iran to the contras. In testifying to this effect, he left the congressional investigating committee with a hard task in any effort to establish that President Reagan had committed an impeachable offense. But let's get the story from Bill Grant at the White House. Bill? Yes, Dan, it was a devastating development, viewed in one way. But several committee members have told us that the principal question they are investigating is the management style of President Reagan.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Marc Gunther, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The incredible shrinking sound bite is about to grow, at least at one network. Presidential candidates will be given at least 30 seconds to speak when they appear on the CBS Evening News With Dan Rather - or they won't be heard at all. The new network policy is a summertime experiment by Rather and Erik Sorenson, executive producer of the broadcast. They are responding to critics who say candidates do not get ample opportunity to be heard on the evening news. "The problem is, whether it's politics or anything else, that the average sound bite on the evening news runs from 8 to 20 seconds," Sorenson said yesterday.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Bob Dole have agreed to four consecutive nights of unfiltered taped appearances on Dan Rather's evening news to comment on issues that will be determined in a CBS nationwide poll. The agreement, a first for a major broadcast network in a presidential election, apparently kills a plan being pushed by Walter Cronkite and others for the three major networks to set aside the same few minutes a night during prime time for the candidates to state their unfiltered views.
NEWS
July 19, 1997 | By Steven N. Krentel
It's not the usual picture of famine. In fact, there are precious few pictures. Those images that do make it out of North Korea present a "stay-at-home" famine, where people survive as best they can: mixing gruel from ground bark, eating pets and wild grasses, and making do on an average of 100 grams of rice a day - one quarter of the minimum needed to sustain life. It is a place where the elderly are too weak to leave their homes because they have given up their food to keep their grandchildren alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1987 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a common reaction, one that we all can appreciate. The boss makes a decision that you just can't swallow. The decision goes against everything you believe in. You are incensed. You consider quitting, but quickly reject that option. Too drastic. Instead, you take a long lunch. Or call in sick the next day. Or look for a new job. Or, if you're Dan Rather and you've just learned the 6:30 p.m. national newscast will be delayed indefinitely because CBS is televising a U.S. Open tennis match, a sports event shoving aside news, you get up from the anchor desk and stomp away.
NEWS
November 21, 1986
While viewing the evening news a few nights ago concerning the alleged secret deals with the United States and Iran, it occurred to me, as it may have occurred to other individuals, just how much goes on within the walls of the White House. I find it very hard to believe that what we see and hear on the news and read in the newspapers is the whole truth and nothing but the truth. It kind of sets your imagination running, doesn't it? Judith A. Paterson Sicklerville, N.J.
NEWS
January 31, 1995 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
China's paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, 90, broke with tradition last night and failed to appear on television on the eve of the Lunar New Year, lending credence to reports that he is critically ill. Last year and on previous Lunar New Year's eves, Deng was featured on the evening news as he toured Shanghai and attended celebrations there. During his appearance last year, he looked frail, but was able to walk and communicate. His daughter, Deng Rong, was always at his side, communicating his words to officials and officials' words to him. This year, however, the national evening news broadcast offered no pictures of Deng.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a common reaction, one that we all can appreciate. The boss makes a decision that you just can't swallow. The decision goes against everything you believe in. You are incensed. You consider quitting, but quickly reject that option. Too drastic. Instead, you take a long lunch. Or call in sick the next day. Or look for a new job. Or, if you're Dan Rather and you've just learned the 6:30 p.m. national newscast will be delayed indefinitely because CBS is televising a U.S. Open tennis match, a sports event shoving aside news, you get up from the anchor desk and stomp away.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | New York Daily News
Although the Pope will say only one Sunday mass during his 10-day U.S. visit, don't look for it on television. NFL football will block live network coverage of the mass this Sunday from San Antonio on both CBS and NBC. "We had made it clear to the Pope's people that we'd be interested in covering the mass if it could be held earlier in the day," said Lane Venardos, executive producer for CBS coverage. "But that was not possible, so we opt not to carry the mass. Football is football.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2015
ON JAN. 16, as I was riding down Market Street, I witnessed a boy lying in the street with a bike close to his body. I thought he was maybe riding the bike and had just been hit by a car. I was just speculating about what happened because I didn't see a car anywhere in sight. SEPTA and Philadelphia police were just then arriving at the scene. He appeared to not be breathing. I could see them performing CPR on him. The incident started to draw a crowd, and I said a prayer and continued on my journey.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Jonathan Tamari, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
NEW YORK - In a year of unusual political volatility, the chatter in the halls of the Waldorf-Astoria was all about who might run in what big races - for Philadelphia mayor and state Supreme Court justice next year and for U.S. Senate in 2016. And when attendees were not trading names of potential candidates, they were speculating about controversies surrounding U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah and Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane and debating how Gov.-elect Tom Wolf will respond to a budget crisis and a solidly GOP legislature when he takes office Jan. 20. This year's event featured some real news, with Supreme Court Justice Ronald D. Castille's comments on Kane, and the incoming Senate majority leader saying he was ready to talk budget deal with Wolf.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
Václav Havel was past president of the Czech Republic, and the author of 21 plays and the essays "The Power of the Powerless," "Living in Truth," and "The Art of the Impossible. " He wrote this essay in 1998. He died Monday/ Does an intellectual - by virtue of his efforts to get beneath the surface of things, to grasp relations, causes, and effects, to recognize individual items as part of larger entities, and thus to derive a deeper awareness of and responsibility for the world - belong in politics?
NEWS
July 29, 2011
WHO'S the aesthetically-challenged, supermarket-tabloid-loving, community-weekly-giveaway fan who engineered the redesign of the Daily News ? The new typefaces are boring, and there's so much empty white space at the top of each page I think I'm looking at an X-ray of Sarah Palin's head. Don't further penalize the loyal readers and subscribers who've kept the Daily News' paper edition afloat with their hard-earned cash for the failure of prior and current ownership to monetize the digital content of Philly.com by persisting with these cheap cosmetic changes to the print edition or, for that matter, continuing to cut the quantity and quality of your journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
A version of this column appeared on Jonathan Storm's blog "Eye of the Storm" at http://www.philly.com/eyeofthestorm . It was so low-key, even a whale couldn't hear it. The inaugural episode Monday of The CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley registered lower on the Richter scale than the little earthquake that hit Philadelphia recently. At least the 1.7 temblor excited a few close neighbors. In the first episode, there was nary a whisper that this was a new man in the driver's seat.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
THERE are four vacancies on Council. Why can't we lose these jobs? I can't believe we need 17 members. We really only need three: one Democrat, one Republican and a trained monkey that could actually do something! Michael Finn, Philadelphia Mayor Nutter created a tax credit for ex-cons. Councilwoman Miller wants job applications to eliminate the question on a criminal past. Now Milton Street allegedly has thousands of ex-con supporters for his mayoral candidacy. I didn't realize this was such an up-and-coming voting bloc.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
This mine rescue was a different kind of story, visceral, primal, a joyous achievement. "What a great thing for humanity," said CNN's Wolf Reynolds, a weatherman, no less. It was a universal human story. Trapped underground. There's no nuance. It's open-and-shut peril that has been understood since before there was language, and family or tribe mates poked one another and grunted, to rally to rescue somebody caught up a tree or stuck in a crevice. Television, at its best with that kind of emotional, unintellectual story, brings the whole wide world into the family these days, live via satellite.
SPORTS
October 28, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Go back and explore baseball in that first week of October 1950, the last time the Phillies and Yankees met in a World Series, and if you confine yourself to what's taking place on the field and not what the players are wearing, earning or saying, you'll find a game that has changed very little. The distances between bases and from the mound to home plate are the same. Infielders still turn double plays, pitchers still outfox hitters with curves and sliders, and managers still like the sacrifice bunt.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
ON JUNE 13, I had the honor of attending the graduation ceremony for Imhotep Charter School's class of 2008 or (6248). For those who aren't aware, Imhotep is predominantly African-American. I was a bit miffed by the lack of media attention given to this affair because every common stereotypical statistic that normally pertains to students of African- American descent was obliterated on that glorious evening. Imhotep's senior class consisted of 103 students who not only graduated, but all 103 have been accepted to institutions of higher learning.
NEWS
May 23, 2008
FIRST, I'd like to offer condolences to the families of every city police officer. It seems your commissioner has made it open season on every one of you. He expects you to be tough on crime, but if you're a little too tough, you're fired. Maybe if we allowed our officers a little flexibility to do their job, this city wouldn't be referred to as Killadelphia. It makes me sick that you can walk down the street with a gun, and if I looked at you wrong, I'm dead. What happened to the rights of every hard-working (note "working")
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