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Everyman

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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He took on public unions early in his term in a way his predecessors didn't or wouldn't. He quickly found himself on national magazine covers and morning shows, with politicos speculating that he would achieve higher office after saving his government from fiscal collapse. He looked like an Everyman and he spoke like an Everyman. Even though his mouth sometimes got him into trouble, he didn't stop using it. And in between the politicking and pontificating, he somehow found time to host sports talk shows.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The real "Joe Doakes" will be 91 in two months. He's healthy and alert - the same extra-pleasant, super-modest Good Joe older Philadelphians remember from the editorial pages of the defunct Evening Bulletin. The real Joe Doakes is cartoonist Franklin O. Alexander, and an exhibit of his political cartoons opens today at Temple University library's Paley Gallery. From 1941 until his retirement in 1967, Alexander drew the cartoon for the Bulletin's editorial page seven days a week.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Margaret McCarty had a thriving costume-design business, a Barrymore Award nomination, and an idea for a strongly visual theater. The concept of a theater created from a design point of view with middle-school children as cast members came to her during her daily fitness runs, she said. This weekend, McCarty's vision is coming to life on the Friends' Central stage in a presentation of Everyman. The play "is not two 11-year-olds standing on stage, saying, 'Romeo.' Personally, I hate to see little kids acting like old men, reading lines they are told - that's like dress-up," McCarty said.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"What do you think of Ronald Reagan for president?" asked Jack Warner's assistant of the legendary movie mogul in 1966. "No, no," Warner corrected, not missing a beat. "Jimmy Stewart for president, Ronald Reagan for best friend. " For once, Warner's casting instincts failed him. As everyone knows, Mr. Reagan went to Washington while Mr. Stewart only did so in the movies. And, as it turned out, Jimmy Stewart, who died last week at the age of 89, was America's best friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
A James Taylor shed tour seems as inevitable as summer itself. But perfect weather and a long-awaited strong new album helped to lift Friday's show at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts far above the commonplace. The balmy surroundings didn't lend themselves to great challenges, and the ever-sensitive Taylor didn't offer many. Studio arrangements of material that he recorded before 1976 made up a third of the show, including a generous offering of The Songs That Must Be Played: "Fire and Rain," "You've Got a Friend," "Carolina in My Mind" and "Sweet Baby James.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Pulp Fiction meets Run Lola Run in this time-warped, Tarantinoesque tale of tumescent ex-cons, transvestite lounge singers, high school hoodlums, and high-heeled hookers set in and around Hamburg's red-light district. St. Pauli Nacht director Sonke Wortmann shows a flair for breezy cynicism and choreographed violence in the derivative but nonetheless enjoyable affair, which tracks a night in the lives of a group of disparate (and often desperate) characters as their paths intersect, sometimes with terrible results.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Comedies about infidelity, or perceived infidelity, or thwarted infidelity, have been a staple of moviedom from the silent-screen era to the last two dozen Judd Apatow ripoffs. What distinguishes The Dilemma in this genre is its resounding unfunnyness, its emotional dishonesty, and the general unlikability of its cast of characters. Directed by Ron Howard and starring Vince Vaughn and Kevin James as best buds and business partners, The Dilemma begins over a dinner between friends: Ronny (Vaughn)
NEWS
July 25, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
They could have called it the Regular Guys tour. As his name suggests, Chicago's MC Common presents himself as a hip-hop everyman. And despite his showy handle, rising R&B star John Legend has crafted an equally modest persona, epitomized by the humility of his hit, "Ordinary People. " Both worked a winning lack of flash at Saturday's sold-out Electric Factory show. Common's description of his performance as a "basement party" seemed fitting for the cavernous, prosaic venue. He focused on cuts from his latest album, Be, which has sold well, thanks in part to production work from Chicago's higher-profile hip-hop star Kanye West - though the audience responded just as strongly to older material.
NEWS
August 3, 1989
He was an uncommonly persistent - and in the end, almost ghostly - idealist, Michael Harrington was. The author and political theorist died Monday at 61 still trying to plant a non-totalitarian, Western European strain of socialism in America. He was a radical in a nation dancing around the center. He saw scant hope in even liberal tinkering, predicting gloomy days ahead if Washington had nothing better to offer the left-behind, the homeless, the new Okies in a polarized, post-industrial land.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Long before the Manic Pixie Dream Girl - that flighty, unstable film and television trope beloved by sensitive young men, reviled by feminists - had a name, Saturday Night Live comedy writer Alan Zweibel had Gilda Radner. After the comedian's death from ovarian cancer at age 42 in 1989, Zweibel wrote Bunny Bunny , a memoir of their almost-relationship and long friendship, and later adapted it for the stage. The show premiered at Philadelphia Theatre Company in 1997. But with this more intimate revival, 1812 Productions - a company helmed by Jennifer Childs, another very funny woman - makes a better fit. Zweibel's script has some issues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Long before the Manic Pixie Dream Girl - that flighty, unstable film and television trope beloved by sensitive young men, reviled by feminists - had a name, Saturday Night Live comedy writer Alan Zweibel had Gilda Radner. After the comedian's death from ovarian cancer at age 42 in 1989, Zweibel wrote Bunny Bunny , a memoir of their almost-relationship and long friendship, and later adapted it for the stage. The show premiered at Philadelphia Theatre Company in 1997. But with this more intimate revival, 1812 Productions - a company helmed by Jennifer Childs, another very funny woman - makes a better fit. Zweibel's script has some issues.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suitcases were piled high behind Jim Stewart's desk in the president's office at Malvern Preparatory School the other day — an apt metaphor, even if they had nothing to do with his departure from the Main Line campus later this month after a memorable 42-year career as a teacher, coach, and administrator. Instead, the luggage was for one final learning adventure with Malvern Prep students in a remote corner of the Peruvian desert 3,500 miles away — the fourth time Stewart has taken high school students there to connect with Villanova University students on a volunteer mission.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Tom Hanks looks darn good for 55. He also looks darn good for Tom Hanks. Slimmer than in recent years. Sunnier than Robert Langdon, the oddly coiffed symbologist/sleuth he played in The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons. Sharper-dressed, too, in a midnight-blue blazer, black shirt, and Levi's. And why not? In Larry Crowne, which opened Friday, Hanks plays the guy who first loses his job and then his house, enrolls in community college, gets a makeover from the second-cutest female on campus, and dates the cutest one, a speech teacher played by Julia Roberts.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
I can't prove it, but I'm almost certain there has never been a political memoir before that contains both juvenile fart jokes and enlightened admissions about mental illness ravaging a family. Then again, there has probably never been a politician like New Jersey's Richard J. "Dick" Codey, who dreamed of calling his book McGreevey's Gay and I'm the New Governor , but ultimately ceded creative ground to publishing pros who preferred Me, Governor? My Life in the Rough-and-Tumble World of New Jersey Politics . The book, written with my former colleague Stephen Seplow, features a cover photo of a shrugging Codey wearing tan chinos, a snug-around-the-belly button-down, and a navy blazer.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He took on public unions early in his term in a way his predecessors didn't or wouldn't. He quickly found himself on national magazine covers and morning shows, with politicos speculating that he would achieve higher office after saving his government from fiscal collapse. He looked like an Everyman and he spoke like an Everyman. Even though his mouth sometimes got him into trouble, he didn't stop using it. And in between the politicking and pontificating, he somehow found time to host sports talk shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Comedies about infidelity, or perceived infidelity, or thwarted infidelity, have been a staple of moviedom from the silent-screen era to the last two dozen Judd Apatow ripoffs. What distinguishes The Dilemma in this genre is its resounding unfunnyness, its emotional dishonesty, and the general unlikability of its cast of characters. Directed by Ron Howard and starring Vince Vaughn and Kevin James as best buds and business partners, The Dilemma begins over a dinner between friends: Ronny (Vaughn)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The iconic image of Gulliver's Travels - Jonathan Swift's book, the myriad illustrated versions, and all the subsequent movies and cartoons - is the one with the giant man splayed on the beach, strapped down by hundreds of tiny ropes, and tiny soldiers clambering furiously over his body. That scene is restaged early in the latest Gulliver's Travels , with Jack Black, fresh from 21st-century Manhattan but tossed ashore on Lilliput, flat on his back, his Converse All-Stars aiming skyward.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
In ancient Athens 2,409 years ago, Socrates stood trial for, essentially, being a philospher, and for teaching the youth under his wing to ask questions. I doubt that he had a bunch of jurors as annoyingly responsive as the ones on the soundtrack that plays throughout Plato's Apology: The Trial of Socrates , a Quintessence Theatre production at Mount Airy's Sedgwick Theater. But he would have been lucky to have the stage persona of the production's Socrates, Sam Tsoutsouvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
Most people, if they were set to turn 88 next month, would be content to have good physical health and their mental faculties intact. However, Stan Lee has proven yet again that he is not most people. He remarkably, continues to produce exceptional work in the comic field. He also continues to break industry records. It was recently announced by BOOM! Studios that the latest creation with his fingerprints, "Stan Lee's Soldier Zero ," has sold over 24,000 copies so far, BOOM!
SPORTS
October 16, 2010 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Over the last two springs, Aaron Walker was the talk of Public League track. Not so much for what he did while sprinting, though he was certainly respectable. The buzz mostly focused on the position he played in football. Sprinter equals halfback, right? Or wideout. Or kick returner. Would you believe guard? "That caused a lot of confusion," Walker said. "Nobody could believe it. I remember talking [to a coach] and he was saying, 'I hear you play football.' When we got to talking about my position and I said I played guard, he was going, 'Are you serious ?
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