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Evolution

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NEWS
December 29, 2006 | By Charles Bernstein
This is the fourth in our traditional year-end series of commissioned poems based on recent Inquirer headlines. The article headlined "A theory's evolution: The Franklin Institute's exhibition on Charles Darwin shows the person behind one of the most revolutionary ideas in science" appeared Oct. 16 on Page E1. The exhibit "Darwin" at the Franklin Institute closes Dec. 31. The Theory of Flawed Design is not a scientifically proven ...
NEWS
December 29, 2005
IN RESPONSE to federal Judge John Jones' recent decision against teaching "intelligent design" in schools: Evolution is a myth. There are two creation stories in Genesis and they're different. In Genesis 1:27, God creates mankind on the sixth day. In Genesis 2:5-7, God creates the man Adam on the third day. The link that makes sense of these two different accounts is the discovery of the Neanderthal people. It makes sense that on the sixth day, when God created Eve, God would also create a separate race called "mankind" (the Neanderthal people)
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | By Virginia Ellis, Los Angeles Times Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Setting new guidelines expected to have a strong impact on the way the origin of life is taught in the United States, the state Board of Education approved a textbook guideline yesterday requiring that evolution be taught as the only theory of life's origin. A board committee Wednesday adopted a statement saying that evolution should be taught as fact, but the final wording of the 190-page curriculum outline adopted by the full board said that evolution would be taught as theory.
NEWS
May 30, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can God and evolution coexist? For many evangelical Christians, the debate over teaching evolution in public schools touches a vital spiritual nerve. Some see evolution as a path to perdition, while others see it as a crowning example of God's handiwork. A legal battle in Dover, Pa., over the teaching of evolution and "intelligent design" has focused new attention on the issue, as have recent proposals in Kansas to change how evolution is taught there. For David Wilcox, a biology professor at Eastern University, an evangelical college in St. Davids, the challenge is to teach students that it's possible to embrace evolution "without intellectual schizophrenia.
NEWS
May 12, 2007
'I'm curious: Is there anybody on the stage that does not . . . believe in evolution?" That was the question put to the 10 GOP presidential hopefuls during a May 3 Republican presidential debate on MSNBC. Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) already had said he did. But when the rest were asked the same question, three hands went up: those of Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas, Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. Ah, the flood of facile jokes!: Those Luddite Republicans!
NEWS
December 9, 2004 | By Mark Hartwig
It's hard to imagine a more innocuous statement than the one the Cobb County, Ga., school board recently ordered pasted into their biology textbooks: "Evolution is a theory, not a fact, regarding the origin of living things. This material should be approached with an open mind, studied carefully, and critically considered. " Yet this disclaimer is the subject of a nationally publicized lawsuit, in which the plaintiff alleges that the wording violates the separation of church and state.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Famed Harvard biologist and evolutionary theorist Stephen Jay Gould came to Bryn Mawr College this week and discussed one of his favorite evolutionary analogues - the evolution of Mickey Mouse. When Mickey appeared in his first cartoon feature, "Steamboat Willie" in 1928, Gould explained, he had a long snout, spindly limbs, a small cranium and looked more like an adult rat than America's favorite mouse. Over the years, however, Disney artists shortened his snout, thickened his limbs and increased his head size to give him a more appealing, childlike appearance.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Jane Eisner
The public statement on the Dover Area School District Web site is both ambiguous and defensive. The district "is in the process of forming a fair and balanced science curriculum. We are not teaching religion," it says. More information will be issued shortly. This is what happens when a small south-central Pennsylvania community defies scientific tradition to become what appears to be the only district in the nation to mandate the teaching of "intelligent design" alongside evolution in high school biology.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | BY JOHN JONIK
Humans evolved, as did all living things, into their present forms through the process of mutations of mutations of mutations . . . all the way back to the dawn of earth life. Everything biologically-connected is a descendant of a rebel, a spinoff from and an improvement on the biological and social establishment. No mutations were created based on mere whim or transient predictions or ignorant, limited wishes until, of course, the age of humans, especially in modern times. Now rebellious mutations are not allowed to flower or even be tested because of self-serving establishment business.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
A recent cartoon in the New Yorker shows a fish in the sea and, on the beach, a parade: first, an amphibian, then a dinosaur, then an ape, followed by a Neanderthal and finally a man holding a book. He looks over his shoulder at them and says, "Scram!" Dipping by coincidence into the current controversy over "intelligent design" versus evolution, the Broadway revival of Edward Albee's Seascape, his 1975 Pulitzer Prize-winning play about evolution, necessarily makes a few waves.
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NEWS
August 29, 2016
In-house researchers at the global real estate giant Hines were crunching data on U.S. cities three years ago - incomes, ages, education levels - to decide which markets to invest in. Their top two picks, Manhattan and Chicago's West Loop, were expected. The third, not so much: Philadelphia's Center City. "Were we surprised? Yes, a little bit," said Chuck Watters, Hines' senior managing director for Mid-Atlantic operations. "But when you kind of walk around the streets a little bit and see what's going on, it's less surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2016 | By Tre'vell Anderson, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
The formula for so-called black films is both specific and ill-defined: Jenifer Lewis, Lynn Whitfield, or Loretta Devine lead a mostly black cast, with Taye Diggs or Morris Chestnut in there somewhere. Spike Lee or Tyler Perry is writer, director, and star. Every character hides her purse around cousin Pookie, and prayer is the only substitute for a doctor's visit. There's often also a Soul Train line to Maze featuring Frankie Beverly's "Before I Let Go" and plenty of sassy neck rolling to go around.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
At the F.A.N. Gallery over more than a decade, I've watched the evolution of the work of Philadelphia realist painter Carlo Russo, particularly the stunning still lifes he's known for. He's showing those, along with some figurative and landscape works, at F.A.N. through March 26. Over the years, one could see Russo - who studied fashion design at the Art Institute and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, from which he graduated in 2004 – aggressively attack complex subject matter across several paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
Wonderful, wonderful - and yet again - wonderful. Wednesday's world premiere of Beasts , an evening-length work made for BalletX by Nicolo Fonte, was so good, I wanted to see it again while it was still happening. So what if the theme of the piece (that old chestnut about nature vs. nurture) was overly ambitious? And so what if a few extraneous elements (the stage smoke, for instance) quickly became annoying? Beasts gives BalletX the choreography that is worthy of its 10 superlative dancers, allowing them to show off both their astonishing technique and their impressive stylistic and dramatic range.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The campaign stop was routine - hands to shake, photos to be taken. Yet on a Sunday afternoon in Northeast Philadelphia, Jim Kenney started to tear up. The son of a firefighter, Kenney was at a school to help paint a mural honoring Michael Goodwin, a firefighter killed in the line of duty. After taking a turn with a paintbrush, he bent to talk to Goodwin's young grandson, telling him his grandfather was a hero who watches over him still. "I'm a little leaky today," said Kenney, long known for the kind of emotional outbursts that get a politician in trouble - or show that he is human.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 13 years since he released his breakout horror picture, Cabin Fever , director Eli Roth's name has become synonymous with torture, bloodletting, and mass murder. He gained international notoriety with 2005's Hostel . That movie captured with clinical precision the most horrific ways the human body can be beaten, torn, cut, stabbed, pulped, and sliced. It made the term torture porn a byphrase. Yet nothing in Roth's oeuvre is more disturbing than his latest picture, Knock Knock , a home-invasion thriller that scrupulously avoids even a single act of physical violence.
SPORTS
September 12, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chip Kelly walked into Disneyland, down Main Street, U.S.A., past Sleeping Beauty Castle, through Tomorrowland, and smack dab in front of Space Mountain. He did all this while playing imaginary games of football, as if he were on a field instead of in one of America's most popular amusement parks. Kelly didn't get on any rides. The roller coaster was in his mind and his companion was another coach. Kelly and Dana Bible liked to talk football. Their conversations always drifted toward X's and O's, and the animated, Northeastern-bred coaches would often act out the plays they crafted in their heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vegetarians need not apply for this one. French director Franck Ribière, along with his favorite butcher, Yves-Marie Le Bourdonnec, goes on a quest to find the perfect steak in Steak (R)evolution . They travel the world, to Brooklyn's Peter Luger, to Montreal's Joe Beef, to Le Bourdonnec's Parisian butcher shop, to farms in Argentina and beyond. Through their mouthwatering journey, they consider trends in the beef industry and the ways globalization has affected how we eat. The breeding of cows in France, for instance, was affected by the rise of grilling in the United States in the 1950s.
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jason Weckstein looks at a bird, he doesn't just see a creature with feathers that flies. He sees the bird as a habitat of related creatures, a teeming community of wee beasties, some of which live - and feast - on its feathers, others that roam more widely and engage in more general mayhem, including gorging on the bird's blood. When he talks about these nasty things, his eyes light up and he smiles with pleasure. "When I'm in the field," he said, "when I'm out bird-watching, I think, 'Boy, I'd love to get the parasites off that host.' " Weckstein, 43, is an expert on chewing lice - about 4,000 of them are known to live on birds - and this year left the Field Museum in Chicago to become associate curator of ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.
SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
WHEN THE SEASON began, it seemed that one thing the Eagles lacked was a slam-dunk Pro Bowl performer on defense, a talent other teams would have to game plan around. There was a time when Trent Cole was that guy, and Cole is still playing well at 32, but Cole's most recent Pro Bowl appearance followed the 2009 season. Though it's early yet, if the squads were chosen today, you'd have to think Connor Barwin, the outside linebacker opposite Cole, might be that guy - maybe along with Malcolm Jenkins, the safety whose cover skills have freed Barwin to rush the passer to the tune of six sacks, tied for third in the NFL going into last night's action.
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