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Evolution

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NEWS
December 29, 2006 | By Charles Bernstein
This is the fourth in our traditional year-end series of commissioned poems based on recent Inquirer headlines. The article headlined "A theory's evolution: The Franklin Institute's exhibition on Charles Darwin shows the person behind one of the most revolutionary ideas in science" appeared Oct. 16 on Page E1. The exhibit "Darwin" at the Franklin Institute closes Dec. 31. The Theory of Flawed Design is not a scientifically proven ...
NEWS
December 29, 2005
IN RESPONSE to federal Judge John Jones' recent decision against teaching "intelligent design" in schools: Evolution is a myth. There are two creation stories in Genesis and they're different. In Genesis 1:27, God creates mankind on the sixth day. In Genesis 2:5-7, God creates the man Adam on the third day. The link that makes sense of these two different accounts is the discovery of the Neanderthal people. It makes sense that on the sixth day, when God created Eve, God would also create a separate race called "mankind" (the Neanderthal people)
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | By Virginia Ellis, Los Angeles Times Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Setting new guidelines expected to have a strong impact on the way the origin of life is taught in the United States, the state Board of Education approved a textbook guideline yesterday requiring that evolution be taught as the only theory of life's origin. A board committee Wednesday adopted a statement saying that evolution should be taught as fact, but the final wording of the 190-page curriculum outline adopted by the full board said that evolution would be taught as theory.
NEWS
May 30, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can God and evolution coexist? For many evangelical Christians, the debate over teaching evolution in public schools touches a vital spiritual nerve. Some see evolution as a path to perdition, while others see it as a crowning example of God's handiwork. A legal battle in Dover, Pa., over the teaching of evolution and "intelligent design" has focused new attention on the issue, as have recent proposals in Kansas to change how evolution is taught there. For David Wilcox, a biology professor at Eastern University, an evangelical college in St. Davids, the challenge is to teach students that it's possible to embrace evolution "without intellectual schizophrenia.
NEWS
May 12, 2007
'I'm curious: Is there anybody on the stage that does not . . . believe in evolution?" That was the question put to the 10 GOP presidential hopefuls during a May 3 Republican presidential debate on MSNBC. Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) already had said he did. But when the rest were asked the same question, three hands went up: those of Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas, Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. Ah, the flood of facile jokes!: Those Luddite Republicans!
NEWS
December 9, 2004 | By Mark Hartwig
It's hard to imagine a more innocuous statement than the one the Cobb County, Ga., school board recently ordered pasted into their biology textbooks: "Evolution is a theory, not a fact, regarding the origin of living things. This material should be approached with an open mind, studied carefully, and critically considered. " Yet this disclaimer is the subject of a nationally publicized lawsuit, in which the plaintiff alleges that the wording violates the separation of church and state.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Famed Harvard biologist and evolutionary theorist Stephen Jay Gould came to Bryn Mawr College this week and discussed one of his favorite evolutionary analogues - the evolution of Mickey Mouse. When Mickey appeared in his first cartoon feature, "Steamboat Willie" in 1928, Gould explained, he had a long snout, spindly limbs, a small cranium and looked more like an adult rat than America's favorite mouse. Over the years, however, Disney artists shortened his snout, thickened his limbs and increased his head size to give him a more appealing, childlike appearance.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Jane Eisner
The public statement on the Dover Area School District Web site is both ambiguous and defensive. The district "is in the process of forming a fair and balanced science curriculum. We are not teaching religion," it says. More information will be issued shortly. This is what happens when a small south-central Pennsylvania community defies scientific tradition to become what appears to be the only district in the nation to mandate the teaching of "intelligent design" alongside evolution in high school biology.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | BY JOHN JONIK
Humans evolved, as did all living things, into their present forms through the process of mutations of mutations of mutations . . . all the way back to the dawn of earth life. Everything biologically-connected is a descendant of a rebel, a spinoff from and an improvement on the biological and social establishment. No mutations were created based on mere whim or transient predictions or ignorant, limited wishes until, of course, the age of humans, especially in modern times. Now rebellious mutations are not allowed to flower or even be tested because of self-serving establishment business.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
A recent cartoon in the New Yorker shows a fish in the sea and, on the beach, a parade: first, an amphibian, then a dinosaur, then an ape, followed by a Neanderthal and finally a man holding a book. He looks over his shoulder at them and says, "Scram!" Dipping by coincidence into the current controversy over "intelligent design" versus evolution, the Broadway revival of Edward Albee's Seascape, his 1975 Pulitzer Prize-winning play about evolution, necessarily makes a few waves.
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NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jason Weckstein looks at a bird, he doesn't just see a creature with feathers that flies. He sees the bird as a habitat of related creatures, a teeming community of wee beasties, some of which live - and feast - on its feathers, others that roam more widely and engage in more general mayhem, including gorging on the bird's blood. When he talks about these nasty things, his eyes light up and he smiles with pleasure. "When I'm in the field," he said, "when I'm out bird-watching, I think, 'Boy, I'd love to get the parasites off that host.' " Weckstein, 43, is an expert on chewing lice - about 4,000 of them are known to live on birds - and this year left the Field Museum in Chicago to become associate curator of ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.
SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
WHEN THE SEASON began, it seemed that one thing the Eagles lacked was a slam-dunk Pro Bowl performer on defense, a talent other teams would have to game plan around. There was a time when Trent Cole was that guy, and Cole is still playing well at 32, but Cole's most recent Pro Bowl appearance followed the 2009 season. Though it's early yet, if the squads were chosen today, you'd have to think Connor Barwin, the outside linebacker opposite Cole, might be that guy - maybe along with Malcolm Jenkins, the safety whose cover skills have freed Barwin to rush the passer to the tune of six sacks, tied for third in the NFL going into last night's action.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* EVOLUTION OF A CRIMINAL. 12:45 p.m. Sunday, BlackStar Film Festival, International House. Tickets: $10. Info: blackstarfest.org. * THE KILLING. Season 4 on Netflix beginning today. LANDING SPIKE LEE as executive producer of his first film is only a piece of the good fortune of Darius Clark Monroe. An honor student who became a bank robber at 16 in an attempt to help his family, Monroe was sentenced to five years in prison, emerging with a determination to go to New York University to learn how to make movies.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Cahill's debut feature, Another Earth , showed with much grace and visual splendor that the most fantastical, grand sci-fi tropes - say, the sudden appearance of a parallel universe in our own - could be metaphors for much more intimate aspects of the human condition. Cahill, who won a Sundance special jury prize for the 2011 film, this time delivers a dose of science fact with his follow-up, I Origins , opening Friday, an arresting piece that touches on religion, evolution, reincarnation, and the nature of the human soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since making her full-length album debut in 1993 with Plantation Lullabies , Meshell Ndegeocello has undergone more musical and lyrical changes than Cher has costumes. Gender- and genre-bending, she has ripped through ever-hazier shades of avant-pop and soul in her most recent albums, the salty jazz and decadent rock of 2012's Pour Une Âme Souveraine: A Dedication to Nina Simone , and the oddly layered dub/dance-hall pop of 2014's Comet, Come to Me . Does she even recognize the woman and the artist she started out as, considering all her changes?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
'We're very aware that the kind of music we play, you could just push a space bar on a laptop and karaoke about. But that's not really how we want to do things," says Lauren Mayberry of the Scottish trio Chvrches. Mayberry, Iain Cook, and Martin Doherty are very aware of how they want to do things. Chvrches' story is a mixture of natural evolution, social media buzz, and cautious control. The three were veterans of a variety of guitar-based bands before beginning to write together in 2011.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHANGHAI - After 14 hours in the tiny seats of a trans-global flight, the Philadelphia Orchestra musicians might question the reasons for performing so far from home, so regularly, in what is becoming an annual springtime visit to China. It's tough. The 6-foot-4 cellist Richard Harlow seemed to spend as much time stretching his legs in the aisle as he did sitting. Another cellist, Robert Cafaro, could only tune out the packed-to-the-gills flight by sleeping in his sunglasses as the plane traveled past Greenland, over the northern ice cap and south, high above Russian cities most people hadn't heard of. But once on the ground in Shanghai, cameras flashed, TV crews came in for close-ups, and large bouquets of roses greeted the nine musicians who were part of the original 1973 debut, when the Philadelphia Orchestra was the first American ensemble to play in the People's Republic of China since the Maoist revolution.
SPORTS
May 7, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here is a year-by-year look at some of Kyle Kendrick's statistics. Kendrick, 3-1 with a 2.43 ERA in six starts this season, is 10-5 in his last 18 starts dating back to last season. He will pitch Tuesday night against the San Francisco Giants.                         Opp.        vs. Year       Record    ERA    avg. L.H. batters   SO per 9 IP 2007       10-4       3.87    .280       .321          3.6 2008       11-9       5.49    .304       .334          3.4 2009       3-1       3.42    .273       .267          5.1 2010       11-10       4.73    .283       .312          4.2 2011       8-6       3.22    .255       .234          4.6 2012       11-12       3.90    .254       .238          6.6 2013       3-1       2.43    .235       .233          6.4 - Bob Brookover SOURCE: BaseballReference.com
SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2004, the Eagles started Brian Dawkins and Michael Lewis at safety. Both reached the Pro Bowl. Both were also second-round picks - Dawkins in 1996, Lewis in 2002. Those picks were the highest the Eagles allocated on a safety since Jesse Campbell in 1991, and the Eagles' evaluations proved to be correct. Replacing them has been an ongoing issue. Other than Quintin Mikell, who was a four-year starter and one-time Pro Bowler, the position has been a revolving door in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. chief executive Brian Roberts, speaking at the Economic Club of Washington on Thursday, said he believes that TV evolved more in the last five years than it did in the prior 50 years. He also said the number of Comcast Internet customers should exceed the number of Comcast TV customers over the next couple years. Comcast currently serves about 20 million Internet subscribers and 22 million TV customers.
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